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Don Ihde (2004). Has the Philosophy of Technology Arrived? A State‐of‐the‐Art Review.

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  1. Ways of Knowing on the Internet: A Qualitative Review of Cancer Websites From a Critical Nursing Perspective.Kristen R. Haase, Roanne T. Thomas, Wendy Gifford & Lorraine F. Holtslander - forthcoming - Nursing Inquiry:e12230.
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    The Roles of Integration in Molecular Systems Biology.Maureen A. O'Malley & Orkun S. Soyer - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 43 (1):58-68.
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    The Roles of Integration in Molecular Systems Biology.Maureen A. O’Malley & Orkun S. Soyer - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 43 (1):58-68.
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    Sustainability Transitions and the Nature of Technology.Erik Paredis - 2011 - Foundations of Science 16 (2-3):195-225.
    For more than 20 years, sustainable development has been advocated as a way of tackling growing global environmental and social problems. The sustainable development discourse has always had a strong technological component and the literature boasts an enormous amount of debate on which technologies should be developed and employed and how this can most efficiently be done. The mainstream discourse in sustainable development argues for an eco-efficiency approach in which a technology push strategy boosts efficiency levels by a factor 10 (...)
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    Findings Follow Framings: Navigating the Empirical Turn.Thomas J. Misa - 2009 - Synthese 168 (3):357-375.
    In this paper, I outline several methodological questions that we need to confront. The chief question is how can we identify the nature of technological change and its varied cultural consequences—including social, political, institutional, and economic dimensions—when our different research methods, using distinct ‘levels’ or ‘scales’ of analysis, yield contradictory results. What can we say, in other words, when our findings about technology follow from the framings of our inquiries? In slightly different terms, can we combine insights from the fine-grained (...)
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