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  1. Dionysius and Longinus on the Sublime: Rhetoric and Religious Language.Casper C. de Jonge - 2012 - American Journal of Philology 133 (2):271-300.
    Longinus' On the Sublime presents itself as a response to the work of the Augustan critic Caecilius of Caleacte. Recent attempts to reconstruct Longinus' intellectual context have largely ignored the works of Dionysius of Halicarnassus, Caecilius' contemporary colleague . This article investigates the concept of hupsos and its religious aspects in Longinus and Dionysius, and reveals a remarkable continuity between the discourse of both authors. Dionysius' works inform us about an Augustan debate on Plato and the sublime, and thereby provide (...)
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  • Horace, Epistles 2. 2: Introspection and Retrospective.R. B. Rutherford - 1981 - Classical Quarterly 31 (2):375-380.
    The epistle to Florus has usually been grouped with the epistle to Augustus and the Ars Poetica, partly because of its length, which sets it, like the other two, apart from the letters of the first book, and partly because of the common interest in literary theory which is manifested in all three. These poems have always been the subject of controversy; but 2. 2 has received less attention than the others, perhaps because the elegance and humour of the poem, (...)
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  • Literary Criticism in the Exegetical Scholia to the Iliad: A Sketch.N. J. Richardson - 1980 - Classical Quarterly 30 (2):265-287.
    The Homeric Scholia are not the most obvious source for literary criticism in the modern sense. And yet if one takes the trouble to read through them one will find many valuable observations about poetic technique and poetic qualities. Nowadays we tend to emphasize different aspects from those which preoccupied ancient critics, but that may be a good reason for looking again at what they have to say.
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  • Ovid's Use of Lucretius in Metamorphoses 1.67–8.Stephen M. Wheeler - 1995 - Classical Quarterly 45 (1):200-203.
    Here Ovid treats the demiurge's disposition of weightless aether over the other elements. This section of the cosmogony follows one that is devoted to the sphere of aer where the creator settles the turbulent winds and other threatening meteorological phenomena. Recently Denis Feeney has suggested that Ovid's demiurge ‘does not act in a very epic manner’ by placing weightless aether on top of the winds. He argues: ‘The oddness of the control is caught in a moment of comparison with Vergil's (...)
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