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  1. Aristotelian Practical Wisdom in Business Ethics: Two Neglected Components.Steven Steyl - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (3):417-428.
    The revival of virtue ethics in contemporary moral philosophy had a major impact on business ethicists, among whom the virtues have become a staple subject of inquiry. Aristotle’s phronēsis is one of those virtues, and a number of texts have examined it in some detail. But analyses of phronēsis in business ethics have neglected some of its most significant and interesting elements. In this paper, I dissect two neglected components of practical wisdom as outlined in Book VI of the Nicomachean (...)
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  • Human Habitat, Space and Place.Miquel Bastons & Jaume Armengou - 2016 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 29 (4):559-570.
    This article is a conceptual contribution on how to make human habitat more sustainable. Taking Heidegger’s conception of “dwelling” as a starting point, a new form of understanding the organization of the city as a human habitat is proposed. It is argued that human habitat is today in crisis and that such crisis has its roots in a spatial understanding of human dwelling, disregarding its temporal-historical dimension. For long time, the city has been considered as a physical “place” and its (...)
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  • Re-Creating the Engagement in Managerial Learning.Eva Gatarik & Rainer Born - 2018 - Human Affairs 28 (1):3-16.
    When defending his doctoral dissertation, Umberto Eco was accused of narrative fallacy because he presented his research as if it were a detective novel. He should have presented only his conclusions. However, this criticism inspired Eco to claim that “[e]very scientific book should be... the report of a quest for some Holy Grail”. A quest presupposes engagement on both sides of the knowledge exchange. Building upon our own research, we have produced a model-theoretic scheme for management studies in support of (...)
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  • The Practical Wisdom Behind the GRI.Laura Sasse-Werhahn - 2019 - Humanistic Management Journal 4 (1):71-84.
    In an effort to meet growing stakeholder demands for transparency, accountability, and responsibility, many large organizations globally have voluntarily adopted the Global Reporting Initiative guidelines. Moreover, triggered by recent management transgressions, the ancient virtue of practical wisdom has gained increased attention from management scholars, who argue that the Aristotelian concept, with its interdisciplinary nature, has the capacity of turning management back into a holistic, contextual, and virtue-orientated practice. Especially the fact that practical wisdom is firmly based on normative values, coupled (...)
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  • Managing Tensions in Corporate Sustainability Through a Practical Wisdom Lens.Laura F. Sasse-Werhahn, Claudius Bachmann & André Habisch - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (1):53-66.
    Previous research has underlined the significance of practical wisdom pertaining to corporate sustainability. Recent studies, however, have identified managing opposing but interlocked tensions related to environmental, social, and economic aspects as one of the most crucial future challenges in CS. Therefore, we apply the established link between wisdom and sustainability to the pressing topic of managing tensions in CS. We commence with a literature overview of tensions in sustainability management, which manifests our basic work assumption concerning the need for practical (...)
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  • Realism and Impartiality: Making Sustainability Effective in Decision-Making.Miquel Bastons & Jaume Armengou - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (4):969-987.
    There is both individual and collective widespread concern in society about the impact of human activity and the effects of our decisions on the physical and social environment. This concern is included within the idea of sustainability. The meaning of the concept is still ambiguous and its practical effectiveness disputed. Like many other authors, this article uses as a starting point the definition proposed by the World Commission on Environment and Development, considering it to be a proposal for changing the (...)
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  • A Developmental Model for Educating Wise Leaders: The Role of Mindfulness and Habitus in Creating Time for Embodying Wisdom.David Rooney, Wendelin Küpers, David Pauleen & Ekatarina Zhuravleva - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (1):181-194.
    This article brings together mindfulness and habitus theory in relation to developing wise leaders. In particular, we present new insights about the intersection of time, subjective and intersubjective experience, and mindfulness that are relevant to developing embodied wisdom in leaders. We show that temporal competence is essential for shaping habitus and developing embodied wisdom. Further, and to extend theoretical understandings of mindfulness in leadership, we argue that temporal capabilities developed through mindfulness can foster embodied wisdom by creating a specific ‘wisdom (...)
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  • When Not Knowing is a Virtue: A Business Ethics Perspective.Joanna Crossman & Vijayta Doshi - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 131 (1):1-8.
    How leaders and managers respond to not knowing is highly relevant given the complex, ambiguous, and chaotic business environment of the twenty-first century. Drawing on the literature from a variety of disciplines, the paper explores the dominant, unfavorable conceptualization of not knowing. The authors present some potential ethical implications of a negative view of not knowing and suggest how organizations would benefit from identifying any unhelpful aspects of the culture that may encourage unethical, undesirable, and/or hasty actions in situations of (...)
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