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  1. Online Privacy as a Corporate Social Responsibility: An Empirical Study.Irene Pollach - 2011 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 20 (1):88-102.
    Information technology and the Internet have added a new stakeholder concern to the corporate social responsibility (CSR) agenda: online privacy. While theory suggests that online privacy is a CSR, only very few studies in the business ethics literature have connected these two. Based on a study of CSR disclosures, this article contributes to the existing literature by exploring whether and how the largest IT companies embrace online privacy as a CSR. The findings indicate that only a small proportion of the (...)
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  • Linking Platforms, Practices, and Developer Ethics: Levers for Privacy Discourse in Mobile Application Development.Katie Shilton & Daniel Greene - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 155 (1):131-146.
    Privacy is a critical challenge for corporate social responsibility in the mobile device ecosystem. Mobile application firms can collect granular and largely unregulated data about their consumers, and must make ethical decisions about how and whether to collect, store, and share these data. This paper conducts a discourse analysis of mobile application developer forums to discover when and how privacy conversations, as a representative of larger ethical debates, arise during development. It finds that online forums can be useful spaces for (...)
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  • Understanding Privacy Online: Development of a Social Contract Approach to Privacy.Kirsten Martin - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 137 (3):551-569.
    Recent scholarship in philosophy, law, and information systems suggests that respecting privacy entails understanding the implicit privacy norms about what, why, and to whom information is shared within specific relationships. These social contracts are important to understand if firms are to adequately manage the privacy expectations of stakeholders. This paper explores a social contract approach to developing, acknowledging, and protecting privacy norms within specific contexts. While privacy as a social contract—a mutually beneficial agreement within a community about sharing and using (...)
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  • Information Relevance Model of Customized Privacy for IoT.Wei Zhou & Selwyn Piramuthu - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 131 (1):19-30.
    Motivated by advances in mass customization in business practice, explosion in the number of internet of things devices, and the lack of published research on privacy differentiation and customization, we propose a contextual information relevance model of privacy. We acknowledge the existence of individual differences with respect to unique security and privacy protection needs. We observe and argue that it is unfair and socially inefficient to treat privacy in a uniform manner whereby a large proportion of the population remain unsatisfied (...)
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  • Employer’s Use of Social Networking Sites: A Socially Irresponsible Practice.Leigh A. Clark & Sherry J. Roberts - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (4):507-525.
    The Internet has drastically changed how people interact, communicate, conduct business, seek jobs, find partners, and shop. Millions of people are using social networking sites to connect with others, and employers are using these sites as a source of background information on job applicants. Employers report making decisions not to hire people based on the information posted on social networking sites. Few employers have policies in place to govern when and how these online character checks should be used and how (...)
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  • An Ethical Exploration of Privacy and Radio Frequency Identification.Alan R. Peslak - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 59 (4):327-345.
    This manuscript reviews the background of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) as well as the ethical foundations of individual privacy. This includes a historical perspective on personal privacy, a review of the United States Constitutional privacy interpretations, the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights, European Union Regulations, as well as the positions of industry and advocacy groups. A brief review of the information technology ethics literature is also included. The RFID privacy concerns are three-fold: pre-sales activities, sales transaction activities, and post-sales (...)
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  • Employer’s Use of Social Networking Sites: A Socially Irresponsible Practice. [REVIEW]Leigh A. Clark & Sherry J. Roberts - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (4):507 - 525.
    The Internet has drastically changed how people interact, communicate, conduct business, seek jobs, find partners, and shop. Millions of people are using social networking sites to connect with others, and employers are using these sites as a source of background information on jobapplicants.Employers report making decisions not to hire people based on the information posted on social networking sites. Few employers have policies in place to govern when and how these online character checks should be used and how to ensure (...)
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  • A Typology of Communicative Strategies in Online Privacy Policies: Ethics, Power and Informed Consent.Irene Pollach - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 62 (3):221-235.
    The opaque use of data collection methods on the WWW has given rise to privacy concerns among Internet users. Privacy policies on websites may ease these concerns, if they communicate clearly and unequivocally when, how and for what purpose data are collected, used or shared. This paper examines privacy policies from a linguistic angle to determine whether the language of these documents is adequate for communicating data-handling practices in a manner that enables informed consent on the part of the user. (...)
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  • Online Privacy as a Corporate Social Responsibility: An Empirical Study.Irene Pollach - 2011 - Business Ethics: A European Review 20 (1):88-102.
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  • The Primary School’s Invasion of the Privacy of the Child: Unmasking the Potential of Some Current Practices.Joan Hanafin, Tom O’Donoghue, Marie Flynn & Michael Shevlin - 2010 - Educational Studies 36 (2):143-152.
    Privacy has been defined as “the protective buffer within which people can avoid another party’s taking something from them, keeping watch over them, or entering into their lives in a way that is both unwelcome and undesirable”. It is a premise of this paper that such a position needs to be taken very seriously in contemporary society, and particularly in the case of schools, as school personnel have the capacity to engage in practices which show great disregard for individual and (...)
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