Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. How Experts Adapt Their Gaze Behavior When Modeling a Task to Novices.Selina N. Emhardt, Ellen M. Kok, Halszka Jarodzka, Saskia Brand‐Gruwel, Christian Drumm & Tamara Gog - 2020 - Cognitive Science 44 (9).
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Writing, Graphic Codes, and Asynchronous Communication.Olivier Morin, Piers Kelly & James Winters - 2018 - Topics in Cognitive Science 12 (2):727-743.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Sculptors, Architects, and Painters Conceive of Depicted Spaces Differently.Claudia Cialone, Thora Tenbrink & Hugo J. Spiers - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (2):524-553.
    Sculptors, architects, and painters are three professional groups that require a comprehensive understanding of how to manipulate spatial structures. While it has been speculated that they may differ in the way they conceive of space due to the different professional demands, this has not been empirically tested. To achieve this, we asked architects, painters, sculptors, and a control group questions about spatially complex pictures. Verbalizations elicited were examined using cognitive discourse analysis. We found significant differences between each group. Only painters (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Contributing to Discourse.Herbert H. Clark & Edward F. Schaefer - 1989 - Cognitive Science 13 (2):259-294.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   53 citations  
  • Toward a Mechanistic Psychology of Dialogue.Martin J. Pickering & Simon Garrod - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (2):169-190.
    Traditional mechanistic accounts of language processing derive almost entirely from the study of monologue. Yet, the most natural and basic form of language use is dialogue. As a result, these accounts may only offer limited theories of the mechanisms that underlie language processing in general. We propose a mechanistic account of dialogue, the interactive alignment account, and use it to derive a number of predictions about basic language processes. The account assumes that, in dialogue, the linguistic representations employed by the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   198 citations  
  • Social Psychological Models of Interpersonal Communication.Robert M. Krauss & Susan R. Fussell - 1996 - In E. E. Higgins & A. Kruglanski (eds.), Social Psychology: Handbook of Basic Principles. Guilford. pp. 655--701.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • To Name or to Describe: Shared Knowledge Affects Referential Form.Daphna Heller, Kristen S. Gorman & Michael K. Tanenhaus - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (2):290-305.
    The notion of common ground is important for the production of referring expressions: In order for a referring expression to be felicitous, it has to be based on shared information. But determining what information is shared and what information is privileged may require gathering information from multiple sources, and constantly coordinating and updating them, which might be computationally too intensive to affect the earliest moments of production. Previous work has found that speakers produce overinformative referring expressions, which include privileged names, (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • The Flexibility of Conceptual Pacts: Referring Expressions Dynamically Shift to Accommodate New Conceptualizations.Alyssa Ibarra & Michael K. Tanenhaus - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Would You Follow Your Own Route Description? Cognitive Strategies in Urban Route Planning.Christoph Hölscher, Thora Tenbrink & Jan M. Wiener - 2011 - Cognition 121 (2):228-247.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Pooling the Ground: Understanding and Coordination in Collective Sense Making.Joanna Rä…Czaszek-Leonardi, Agnieszka Dä™Bska & Adam Sochanowicz - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Production of Referring Expressions for an Unknown Audience: A Computational Model of Communal Common Ground.Roman Kutlak, Kees van Deemter & Chris Mellish - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Building Common Ground in Global Teamwork Through Re-Representation.Renate Fruchter & Rodolphe Courtier - 2011 - AI and Society 26 (3):233-245.
    We explore in this paper the relation between activities, communication channels and media, and common ground building in global teams. We define re-representation as a sequence of representations of the same concept using different communication channels and media. We identified the re - representation technique to build common ground that is used by team members during multimodal and multimedia communicative events in cross-disciplinary, geographically distributed settings. Our hypotheses are as follows: (1) Significant sources of information behind decisions and request for (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Editors' Introduction: Miscommunication.Patrick G. T. Healey, Jan P. de Ruiter & Gregory J. Mills - 2018 - Topics in Cognitive Science 10 (2):264-278.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Interface of Linguistic and Visual Information During Audience Design.Kumiko Fukumura - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (6):1419-1433.
    Evidence suggests that speakers can take account of the addressee's needs when referring. However, what representations drive the speaker's audience design has been less clear. This study aims to go beyond previous studies by investigating the interplay between the visual and linguistic context during audience design. Speakers repeated subordinate descriptions given in the prior linguistic context less and used basic-level descriptions more when the addressee did not hear the linguistic context than when s/he did. But crucially, this effect happened only (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Effect of Information Overlapon Communication Effectiveness.Shali Wu & Boaz Keysar - 2007 - Cognitive Science: A Multidisciplinary Journal 30 (1):169-181.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • The Effect of Information Overlap on Communication Effectiveness.Shali Wu & Boaz Keysar - 2007 - Cognitive Science 31 (1):169-181.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • The Influence of Shared Visual Context on the Successful Emergence of Conventions in a Referential Communication Task.Thomas F. Müller, James Winters & Olivier Morin - 2019 - Cognitive Science 43 (9).
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Talker-Specific Generalization of Pragmatic Inferences Based on Under- and Over-Informative Prenominal Adjective Use.Amanda Pogue, Chigusa Kurumada & Michael K. Tanenhaus - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Audience Design in Multiparty Conversation.Si On Yoon & Sarah Brown‐Schmidt - 2019 - Cognitive Science 43 (8).
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • What's in a Name? Interlocutors Dynamically Update Expectations About Shared Names.Whitney M. Gegg-Harrison & Michael K. Tanenhaus - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Spatial Language and the Embedded Listener Model in Parents’ Input to Children.Katrina Ferrara, Malena Silva, Colin Wilson & Barbara Landau - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (8):1877-1910.
    Language is a collaborative act: To communicate successfully, speakers must generate utterances that are not only semantically valid but also sensitive to the knowledge state of the listener. Such sensitivity could reflect the use of an “embedded listener model,” where speakers choose utterances on the basis of an internal model of the listener's conceptual and linguistic knowledge. In this study, we ask whether parents’ spatial descriptions incorporate an embedded listener model that reflects their children's understanding of spatial relations and spatial (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Recipient Design in Tacit Communication.Sarah E. Newman-Norlund, Matthijs L. Noordzij, Roger D. Newman-Norlund, Inge A. C. Volman, Jan Peter de Ruiter, Peter Hagoort & Ivan Toni - 2009 - Cognition 111 (1):46-54.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Co-Ordination of Spatial Perspectives in Response to Addressee Feedback: Effects of Perceived Addressee Understanding.Kavita E. Thomas & Elena Andonova - 2012 - Pragmatics and Cognition 20 (3):505-545.
    In this paper we investigate the effect of level of understanding revealed by feedback in the form of clarification requests from a route follower on a route giver’s spatial perspective choice in their response in route instruction dialogues. In an experiment varying the level of understanding displayed by route follower clarification requests (the independent variable), route giver perspective switching in response to this feedback is investigated. Three levels of understanding displayed by feedback are investigated: (1) low-level clarification requests indicating that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • When Do Speakers Take Into Account Common Ground?William S. Horton & Boaz Keysar - 1996 - Cognition 59 (1):91-117.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   55 citations  
  • Expertise and Estimating What Other People Know: The Influence of Professional Experience and Type of Knowledge.Rainer Bromme, Riklef Rambow & Matthias Nückles - 2001 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 7 (4):317.
  • Do You Know What I Know? The Impact of Participant Role in Children's Referential Communication.Holly P. Branigan, Jenny Bell & Janet F. McLean - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Generating References in Naturalistic Face‐to‐Face and Phone‐Mediated Dialog Settings.Dominique Knutsen, Christine Ros & Ludovic Le Bigot - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (4):796-818.
    During dialog, references are presented, accepted, and potentially reused. Two experiments were conducted to examine reuse in a naturalistic setting. In Experiment 1, where the participants interacted face to face, self-presented references and references accepted through verbatim repetition were reused more. Such biases persisted after the end of the interaction. In Experiment 2, where the participants interacted over the phone, reference reuse mainly depended on whether the participant could see the landmarks being referred to, although this bias seemed to be (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Less Is More: A Minimalist Account of Joint Action in Communication.Hadas Shintel & Boaz Keysar - 2009 - Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (2):260-273.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  • Listeners Invest in an Assumed Other’s Perspective Despite Cognitive Cost.Nicholas D. Duran, Rick Dale & Roger J. Kreuz - 2011 - Cognition 121 (1):22-40.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Revisiting the Memory‐Based Processing Approach to Common Ground.William S. Horton & Richard J. Gerrig - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (4):780-795.
    Horton and Gerrig outlined a memory-based processing model of conversational common ground that provided a description of how speakers could both strategically and automatically gain access to information about others through domain-general memory processes acting over ordinary memory traces. In this article, we revisit this account, reviewing empirical findings that address aspects of this memory-based model. In doing so, we also take the opportunity to clarify what we believe this approach implies about the cognitive psychology of common ground, and just (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Producing Pronouns and Definite Noun Phrases: Do Speakers Use the Addressee's Discourse Model?Kumiko Fukumura & Roger P. G. van Gompel - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (7):1289-1311.
    We report two experiments that investigated the widely held assumption that speakers use the addressee’s discourse model when choosing referring expressions (e.g., Ariel, 1990; Chafe, 1994; Givón, 1983; Prince, 1985), by manipulating whether the addressee could hear the immediately preceding linguistic context. Experiment 1 showed that speakers increased pronoun use (and decreased noun phrase use) when the referent was mentioned in the immediately preceding sentence compared to when it was not, even though the addressee did not hear the preceding sentence, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Modeling Reference Production as the Probabilistic Combination of Multiple Perspectives.Mindaugas Mozuraitis, Suzanne Stevenson & Daphna Heller - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (S4):974-1008.
    While speakers have been shown to adapt to the knowledge state of their addressee in choosing referring expressions, they often also show some egocentric tendencies. The current paper aims to provide an explanation for this “mixed” behavior by presenting a model that derives such patterns from the probabilistic combination of both the speaker's and the addressee's perspectives. To test our model, we conducted a language production experiment, in which participants had to refer to objects in a context that also included (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Conversation, Gaze Coordination, and Beliefs About Visual Context.Daniel C. Richardson, Rick Dale & John M. Tomlinson - 2009 - Cognitive Science 33 (8):1468-1482.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • The Role of Beliefs in Lexical Alignment: Evidence From Dialogs with Humans and Computers.Holly P. Branigan, Martin J. Pickering, Jamie Pearson, Janet F. McLean & Ash Brown - 2011 - Cognition 121 (1):41-57.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Syntactic Alignment and Participant Role in Dialogue.Holly P. Branigan, Martin J. Pickering, Janet F. McLean & Alexandra A. Cleland - 2007 - Cognition 104 (2):163-197.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • The Intentionalist Controversy and Cognitive Science.Raymond W. Gibbs - 1993 - Philosophical Psychology 6 (2):181-205.
    Abstract What role do speakers'/authors? communicative intentions play in language interpretation? Cognitive scientists generally assume that listeners'/readers? recognitions of speakers'/authors? intentions is a crucial aspect of utterance interpretation. Various philosophers, literary theorists and anthropologists criticize this intentional view and assert that speakers'/authors? intentions do not provide either the starting point for linguistic interpretation or constrain how texts should be understood. Until now, cognitive scientists have not seriously responded to the current challenges regarding intentions in communication. My purpose in this article (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Compensating for an Inattentive Audience.Nicole N. Craycraft & Sarah Brown‐Schmidt - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (5):1504-1528.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Memory and Common Ground Processes in Language Use.Sarah Brown‐Schmidt & Melissa C. Duff - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (4):722-736.
    During communication, we form assumptions about what our communication partners know and believe. Information that is mutually known between the discourse partners—their common ground—serves as a backdrop for successful communication. Here we present an introduction to the focus of this topic, which is the role of memory in common ground and language use. Two types of questions emerge as central to understanding the relationship between memory and common ground, specifically questions having to do with the representation of common ground in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations