Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Limitations of Hoerl and McCormack's Dual Systems Model of Temporal Consciousness.Eve A. Isham, Elijah M. Ziskin & Mary A. Peterson - 2019 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 42.
    Hoerl & McCormack's dual systems framework provides a new avenue toward the scientific investigation of temporal cognition. However, some shortcomings of the model should be considered. These issues include their reliance on a somewhat vague consideration of “systems” rather than specific computational processes. Moreover, the model does not consider the subjective nature of temporal experience or the role of consciousness in temporal cognition.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Rewarding Performance Feedback Alters Reported Time of Action.Eve A. Isham & Joy J. Geng - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1577-1585.
    Past studies have shown that the perceived time of actions is retrospectively influenced by post-action events. The current study examined whether rewarding performance feedback altered the reported time of action. In Experiment 1, participants performed a speeded button press task and received monetary reward for a presumed “fast,” or a monetary punishment for a presumed “slow” response. Rewarded trials resulted in the false perception that the response action occurred earlier than punished trials. In Experiments 2 and 3, the need for (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Is That What I Wanted to Do? Cued Vocalizations Influence the Phenomenology of Controlling a Moving Object.John A. Dewey & Thomas H. Carr - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):507-525.
    The phenomenology of controlled action depends on comparisons between predicted and actually perceived sensory feedback called action-effects. We investigated if intervening task-irrelevant but semantically related information influences monitoring processes that give rise to a sense of control. Participants judged whether a moving box “obeyed” or “disobeyed” their own arrow keystrokes or visual cues representing the computer’s choices . During 1 s delays between keystrokes/cues and box movements, participants vocalized directions cued by letters inside the box. Congruency of cued vocalizations was (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation