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  1. Matter and Spirit as Natural Symbols in Eighteenth-Century British Natural Philosophy.C. B. Wilde - 1982 - British Journal for the History of Science 15 (2):99-131.
    During the course of the eighteenth century important changes occurred in the conception of matter held by British natural philosophers. Historians of science have described these changes in different ways, but certain common features can be abstracted from the more recent accounts. First, there was a movement away from Newtonian matter theory, which saw all matter as the various organizations of homogeneous particles and the forces of attraction and repulsion acting between them. In place of this theory increasing favour was (...)
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  • Cicero the Pantheist: A Radical Reading of Ciceronian Scepticism in John Toland'sPantheisticon.Katherine A. East - 2016 - Intellectual History Review 26 (2):245-261.
  • Unholy Force: Toland's Leibnizian 'Consummation' of Spinozism.Ian Leask - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (3):499-537.
    This article argues that the Fourth and Fifth of John Toland's Letters to Serena are best understood as a creative confrontation of Spinoza and Leibniz ? one in which crucial aspects of Leibniz's thought are extracted from their original context and made to serve a purpose that is ultimately Spinozistic. Accordingly, it suggests that the critique of Spinoza that takes up so much of the fourth Letter, in particular, should be read as a means of `perfecting' Spinoza (via Leibniz), rather (...)
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  • An Unpublished Record of a Masonic Lodge in England : 1710.M. C. Jacob - 1970 - Zeitschrift für Religions- Und Geistesgeschichte 22 (2):168-171.
  • Science, Reason, and Religion in the Age of Newton.Geoffrey Holmes - 1978 - British Journal for the History of Science 11 (2):164-171.
  • Toland and Locke in the Leibniz-Burnett Correspondence.Stewart Duncan - 2017 - Locke Studies 17:117-141.
    Leibniz's correspondence with Thomas Burnett of Kemnay is probably best known for Leibniz's attempts to communicate with Locke via Burnett. But Burnett was also, more generally a source of English intellectual news for Leibniz. As such, Burnett provided an important part of the context in which Locke was presented to and understood by Leibniz. -/- This paper examines the Leibniz-Burnett correspondence, and argues against Jolley's suggestion that "the context in which Leibniz learned about Locke was primarily a theological one". That (...)
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  • L’Art de Lire Toland.Laurent Jaffro - 1995 - Revue de Synthèse 116 (2-3):399-419.
  • Anthony Collins on the Emergence of Consciousness and Personal Identity.William Uzgalis - 2009 - Philosophy Compass 4 (2):363-379.
    The correspondence between Samuel Clarke and Anthony Collins of 1706–8, while not well known, is a spectacularly good debate between a dualist and a materialist over the possibility of giving a materialist account of consciousness and personal identity. This article puts the Clarke Collins Correspondence in a broader context in which it can be better appreciated, noting that it is really a debate between John Locke and Anthony Collins on one hand, and Samuel Clarke and Joseph Butler on the other. (...)
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  • Coleridge and Natural Philosophy: A Review of Recent Literary and Historical Research. [REVIEW]Elinor S. Shaffer - 1974 - History of Science 12 (4):284-298.
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  • Newtonian Natural Philosophy and the Scientific Revolution.P. M. Heimann - 1973 - History of Science 11 (1):1-7.