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Patterns in the Mind: Language and Human Nature

New York: Basic Books (1994)

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  1. Wired for Society: Cognizing Pathways to Society and Culture.Laurence Kaufmann & Fabrice Clément - 2014 - Topoi 33 (2):459-475.
    While cognitive scientists increase their tentative incursions in the social domains traditionally reserved for social scientists, most sociologists and anthropologists keep decrying those attempts as reductionist or, at least, irrelevant. In this paper, we argue that collaboration between social and cognitive sciences is necessary to understand the impact of the social environment on the shaping of our mind. More specifically, we dwell on the cognitive strategies and early-developing deontic expectations, termed naïve sociology, which enable well-adapted individuals to constitute, maintain and (...)
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  • La Typification des Atteintes aux Bonnes Moeurs: Approache Praxéologique d'une affaire égyptienne.Baudouin Dupret - 1998 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 11 (3):303-322.
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  • Liability for Animals: An Historico-Structural Comparison. [REVIEW]Bernard S. Jackson - 2011 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 24 (3):259-289.
    This account of civil liability for animals in a range of ancient, mediaeval and modern legal systems (based on a series of studies conducted early in my career: (s.1)) uses semiotic analysis to supplement the insights of conventional legal history, thus balancing diachronic and synchronic approaches. It reinforces the conventional historical sensitivity to anachronism in two respects: (1) (logical) inference of underlying values from concrete rules (rather than attending to literary features of the text) manifests cognitive anachronism, an issue manifest (...)
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  • Towards a New Analytical Framework for Legal Communication.Hanneke van Schooten - 2014 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 27 (3):425-461.
    This article develops a model first proposed in my book Jurisprudence and communication [67]. It takes as its starting point the generally conception that legal rules are valid norms, involving a normative content and expressing themselves in reality through observable conduct. This dualistic character of law is central. Law is both fiction and factual, ideal and real. But the viewpoint that a legal rule is a manifestation of validity in reality, through empirical acts, raises the question how rules as (valid) (...)
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  • On Categorial Membership.Michael Freund - 2014 - Erkenntnis 79 (5):1045-1068.
    We investigate the family of concepts that an agent comes to know through a set of defining features, and examine the role played by these features in the process of categorization. In a qualitative framework, categorial membership is evaluated through an order relation among the objects at hand, which translates the fact that an object may fall more than another under a given concept. For concepts defined by their features, this global membership order depends on the degree with which each (...)
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  • Overlooked skyhooks.Robert L. Campbell - 1998 - Metascience 7 (3):489-499.
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  • Universales Morales: La Ciencia de la Naturaleza Humana y El Enfoque de la Ética Cognitiva.Enrique Fernando Bocardo Crespo - 2017 - Daimon: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 70:147-164.
    Recent trends in Cognitive Ethics have emphasized the conceptual debts with the development of the Science of Human Nature in the late 1600s and early 1700s. The paper deals mainly with two major theoretical approaches in the cognitive revolution, that is possible to offer an explanation of the cognitive mechanisms involved in moral decision processes in terms of abstract principles allegedly embedded in human nature; and that there might be substantive reasons to assume a moral faculty to account for the (...)
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  • The Dependence of Language on Consciousness.Jordan Zlatev - 2008 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (6):34-62.
    The first hurdle to overcome in approaching the complex topic of the relation between language and consciousness is terminology. So let me begin, in good philosophical style, by explaining the senses in which I use the three lexical terms in the title. Luckily I need not explain those of the three grammatical words the, of, and on: there is probably a minor library of semantic literature devoted to that. I need not, since I both know their meanings pre-theoretically, and know (...)
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  • The Faculty of Language: What's Special About It?Ray Jackendoff & Steven Pinker - 2005 - Cognition 95 (2):201-236.
    We examine the question of which aspects of language are uniquely human and uniquely linguistic in light of recent suggestions by Hauser, Chomsky, and Fitch that the only such aspect is syntactic recursion, the rest of language being either specific to humans but not to language (e.g. words and concepts) or not specific to humans (e.g. speech perception). We find the hypothesis problematic. It ignores the many aspects of grammar that are not recursive, such as phonology, morphology, case, agreement, and (...)
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  • Beyond Speech Balloons and Thought Bubbles: The Integration of Text and Image.Neil Cohn - 2013 - Semiotica 2013 (197):35-63.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Semiotica - Journal of the International Association for Semiotic Studies / Revue de l'Association Internationale de Sémiotique Jahrgang: 2013 Heft: 197 Seiten: 35-63.
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  • Universal Grammar and Second Language Acquisition: The Null Hypothesis.Samuel David Epstein, Suzanne Flynn & Gita Martohardjono - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):746-758.
  • UG, the L1, and Questions of Evidence.Lydia White - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):745-746.
    Epstein, Flynn, and Martohardjono's presentation of the principal approaches to UG access in L2 acquisition is misleading; they have neglected the possibility that the L1 grammar forms the learner's initial representation of the L2, with subsequent modifications constrained by UG. Furthermore, their experimental data are open to several interpretations and are consistent with a number of different positions in the field.
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  • Partial Transfer, Not Partial Access.Anne Vainikka & Martha Young-Scholten - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):744-745.
  • Towards Characterizing What the L2 Learner Knows.Esther Torrego - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):744-744.
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  • “Full Access” and the History of Linguistics.Margaret Thomas - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):743-744.
  • Appreciating the Poverty of the Stimulus in Second Language Acquisition.Rex A. Sprouse - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):742-743.
  • On Gradience and Optionality in Non-Native Grammars.Antonella Sorace - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):741-742.
  • Metalinguistic Ability and Primary Linguistic Data.M. A. Sharwood Smith - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):740-741.
  • Now for Some Facts, with a Focus on Development and an Explicit Role for the L1.Bonnie D. Schwartz - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):739-740.
  • Language Growth After Puberty?Carlos P. Otero - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):738-739.
  • Syntactic Representations and the L2 Acquisition Device.William O'Grady - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):737-738.
  • Some Incorrect Implications of the Fullaccess Hypothesis.Frederick J. Newmeyer - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):736-737.
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  • Language is Learned.Brian MacWhinney - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):735-736.
  • Universal Grammar and Critical Periods: A Most Amusing Paradox.Philip Lieberman - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):735-735.
  • To “Grow” and What “to Grow,” That is One Question.Juana M. Liceras - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):734-734.
  • Why Don't L2 Learners End Up with Uniform and Perfect Linguistic Competence?Ping Li - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):733-734.
  • In Support of the Early Presence of Functional Categories in Second Language Acquisition.Kazue Kanno - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):732-733.
  • L2 Access to UG: Now You See It, Now You Don't.Michael Harrington - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):731-732.
  • Competence and Performance in Language Acquisition.Mark Hale - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):730-731.
  • Can UG and L1 Be Distinguished in L2 Acquisition?Ken Hale - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):728-730.
  • Does Second Language Grow?Günther Grewendorf - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):727-728.
  • UG and SLA: The Access Question, and How to Beg It.Kevin R. Gregg - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):726-727.
  • Adult Language Acquisition and Universal Grammar.Robert Freidin - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):725-726.
  • Methodological Problems with Epstein, Flynn, and Martohardjono's Research.Lynn Eubank - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):724-725.
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  • UG and Acquisition in Pidginization and Creolization.Michel DeGraff - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):723-724.
  • How Adult Second Language Learning Differs From Child First Language Development.Harald Clahsen & Pieter Muysken - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):721-723.
  • Parameter-Setting in Second Language Acquisition – Explanans and Explanandum.Susanne E. Carroll - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):720-721.
  • Access to Universal Grammar: The Real Issues.Hagit Borer - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):718-720.
    Issues concerning UG access for L2 acquisition as formulated by Epstein et al. are misleading as well as poorly discussed. UG accessibility can only be fully evaluated with respect to the steady state gram mar reached by the learner. The steady state for LI learners is self evidently the adult grammar in the speech community. For L2 learners, however, the steady state is not obvious. Yet, without its clear characterization, debates concerning stages of L2 acquisition and direct and indirect UG (...)
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  • What We Have to Explain in Foreign Language Learning.Robert Bley-Vroman - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):718-718.
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  • Full Access to the Evidence for Falsification.David Birdsong - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):717-717.
  • A Dim Monocular View of Universal-Grammar Access.Derek Bickerton - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):716-717.
    This target article's handling of theory and data and the range of evidence surveyed for its main contention fall short of normal BBS standards. However, the contention itself is reasonable and can be supported if one rejects the metaphor for linguistic competence and accepts that are no more than the way the brain does language.
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  • Transfer in L2 Grammars.Rakesh M. Bhatt & Barbara Hancin-Bhatt - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):715-716.
  • Functional Categories in L2 Acquisition: Evidence of Presence is Not Necessarily Presence of Evidence.John Archibald, Eithne Guilfoyle & Elizabeth Ritter - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):714-715.
  • Second Language Acquisition: Theoretical and Experimental Issues in Contemporary Research.Samuel David Epstein, Suzanne Flynn & Gita Martohardjono - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):677-714.
    To what extent, if any, does Universal Grammar (UG) constrain second language (L2) acquisition? This is not only an empirical question, but one which is currently investigable. In this context, L2 acquisition is emerging as an important new domain of psycholinguistic research. Three logical possibilities have been articulated regarding the role of UG in L2 acquisition: The first is the hypothesis that claims that no aspect of UG is available to the L2 learner. The second is the hypothesis that claims (...)
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  • Proper Nouns.Samuel Cumming - unknown
    This dissertation is an experiment: what happens if we treat proper names as anaphoric expressions on a par with pronouns? The first thing to notice is that a name's `antecedent' can occur in a discourse prior to the one containing the name. An individual may be introduced and tagged with a name in one context, and then retrieved using the name in a later context. To allow for discourse-crossing anaphora, in addition to the usual cross-sentential anaphora, a revision of discourse (...)
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  • Poverty of the Stimulus Revisited.Robert C. Berwick, Paul Pietroski, Beracah Yankama & Noam Chomsky - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (7):1207-1242.
    A central goal of modern generative grammar has been to discover invariant properties of human languages that reflect “the innate schematism of mind that is applied to the data of experience” and that “might reasonably be attributed to the organism itself as its contribution to the task of the acquisition of knowledge” (Chomsky, 1971). Candidates for such invariances include the structure dependence of grammatical rules, and in particular, certain constraints on question formation. Various “poverty of stimulus” (POS) arguments suggest that (...)
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