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  1. Sport as a Hobby: In Defense of ‘the Gentle Pursuit of a Modest Competence’.R. Scott Kretchmar - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 46 (3):367-382.
    ABSTRACTIn this essay, I defend sport as a hobby in contrast to sport as a ‘mutual quest for excellence through challenge’. With the assistance of ideas found in the novel Don Quixote, I rai...
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  • Epistemology and Social Work: Integrating Theory, Research and Practice Through Philosophical Pragmatism.Steve J. Hothersall - unknown
    Debates regarding theory and practice in social work have often avoided detailed discussion regarding the nature of knowledge itself and the various ways this can be created. As a result, positivistic conceptions of knowledge are still assumed by many to be axiomatic, such that context-dependent and practitioner-oriented approaches to knowledge creation and use are assumed to lack epistemological rigor and credibility. By drawing on epistemology, this theoretical paper outlines the case for a renewed approach to knowledge definition, creation and use (...)
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  • Where Exactly is the ‘Real’ in Critical Realism? Plus, a Dewey-James Alternative.Zachary Wehrwein - 2019 - Journal of Critical Realism 18 (3):337-346.
    Volume 18, Issue 3, June 2019, Page 337-346.
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  • Review of C. Koopman, Pragmatism as Transition. Historicity and Hope in James, Dewey, and Rorty. [REVIEW]Roberto Frega - 2009 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 1 (1).
  • A Peircean Epistemic Argument for a Modest Multiculturalism.J. Caleb Clanton & Andrew T. Forcehimes - 2011 - Contemporary Pragmatism 8 (2):163-185.
    Extending recent appropriations of Charles S. Peirce's work in political theory, we argue that the same epistemic norms that justify democracy offer a plausible basis for justifying multiculturalist policies aimed at protecting at-risk cultural groups. Because this epistemic argument is compatible with a full range of reasonable comprehensive doctrines, it fully accommodates the fact of reasonable pluralism, thereby skirting the Rawlsian objection to which the multiculturalisms of Charles Taylor and Will Kymlicka fall prey.
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  • Putting Together Connectionism – Again.Paul Smolensky - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):59-74.
  • The Reality of the Symbolic and Subsymbolic Systems.Andrew Woodfield & Adam Morton - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):58-58.
  • Has the Case Been Made Against the Ecumenical View of Connectionism?Robert Van Gulick - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):57-58.
  • The Essential Opacity of Modular Systems: Why Even Connectionism Cannot Give Complete Formal Accounts of Cognition.Marten J. den Uyl - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):56-57.
  • On the Proper Treatment of Thermostats.David S. Touretzky - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):55-56.
    A set of hypotheses is formulated for a connectionist approach to cognitive modeling. These hypotheses are shown to be incompatible with the hypotheses underlying traditional cognitive models. The connectionist models considered are massively parallel numerical computational systems that are a kind of continuous dynamical system. The numerical variables in the system correspond semantically to fine-grained features below the level of the concepts consciously used to describe the task domain. The level of analysis is intermediate between those of symbolic cognitive models (...)
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  • From Data to Dynamics: The Use of Multiple Levels of Analysis.Gregory O. Stone - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):54-55.
  • From Connectionism to Eliminativism.Stephen P. Stich - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):53-54.
  • How Fully Should Connectionism Be Activated? Two Sources of Excitation and One of Inhibition.Roger N. Shepard - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):52-52.
  • Structure and Controlling Subsymbolic Processing.Walter Schneider - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):51-52.
  • Making the Connections.Jay G. Rueckl - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):50-51.
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  • Sanity Surrounded by Madness.Georges Rey - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):48-50.
  • A Two-Dimensional Array of Models of Cognitive Function.Gardner C. Quarton - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):48-48.
  • Subsymbols Aren't Much Good Outside of a Symbol-Processing Architecture.Alan Prince & Steven Pinker - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):46-47.
  • Connections Among Connections.R. J. Nelson - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):45-46.
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  • In Defence of Neurons.Chris Mortensen - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):44-45.
  • Epistemological Challenges for Connectionism.John McCarthy - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):44-44.
  • Pragmatism, Realism, and Religion.Michael R. Slater - 2008 - Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (4):653-681.
    Pragmatism is often thought to be incompatible with realism, the view that there are knowable mind-independent facts, objects, or properties. In this article, I show that there are, in fact, realist versions of pragmatism and argue that a realist pragmatism of the right sort can make important contributions to such fields as religious ethics and philosophy of religion. Using William James's pragmatism as my primary example, I show (1) that James defended realist and pluralist views in metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and (...)
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  • What's in a Name? Twentieth-Century Realism in Kenneth Burke's Aesthetics.Evelyn Burg - 2016 - Modern Intellectual History 13 (3):713-745.
    This article discusses the philosopher-literary critic Kenneth Burke's philosophic realism. It traces central ideas in his own thought back to the new realists of the early twentieth century via his year at Columbia university and his close connection with Richard McKeon. It also describes and explains Burke's interactions with New Critic John Crowe Ransom as well as the period's logical positivists and his universalist counters to linguistic nominalism in favor of realism.
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  • The Language of Stones.Megan Craig - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Phenomenology 5 (2):119-137.
    ABSTRACTThis article examines works by the American-born, Paris-based artist Sheila Hicks and her sense of the universal communicability of thread. Hicks bridges cultures and resists simple identification with any single nationality, media, or art historical paradigm. For these reasons and others, it is timely to examine her work and its relevance for pluralistic, feminist thought. The article situates Hicks in relation to Sarah Ruhl’s 2008 play Eurydice, to Heidegger’s essay “The Origin of the Work of Art,” and to ideas about (...)
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