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  1. Towards responsible ejaculations: the moral imperative for male contraceptive responsibility.Arianne Shahvisi - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (5):328-336.
    In this paper, I argue that men should take primary responsibility for protecting against pregnancy. Male long-acting reversible contraceptives are currently in development, and, once approved, should be used as the standard method for avoiding pregnancy. Since women assume the risk of pregnancy when they engage in penis-in-vagina sex, men should do their utmost to ensure that their ejaculations are responsible, otherwise women shoulder a double burden of pregnancy risk plus contraceptive responsibility. Changing the expectations regarding responsibility for contraception would (...)
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  • How to hold an ethical pox party.Euzebiusz Jamrozik - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2017-104336.
    Pox parties are a controversial alternative to vaccination for diseases such as chickenpox. Such parties involve parents infecting non-immune children by exposing them to a contagious child. If successful, infection will usually lead to immunity, thus preventing infection later in life, which, for several vaccine-preventable diseases, is more severe than childhood infection. Some may consider pox parties more morally objectionable than opting out of vaccination through non-medical exemptions. In this paper, I argue that this is not the case. Pox parties (...)
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  • Raising Rates of Childhood Vaccination: The Trade-off Between Coercion and Trust.Bridget Haire, Paul Komesaroff, Rose Leontini & C. Raina MacIntyre - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (2):199-209.
    Vaccination is a highly effective public health strategy that provides protection to both individuals and communities from a range of infectious diseases. Governments monitor vaccination rates carefully, as widespread use of a vaccine within a population is required to extend protection to the general population through “herd immunity,” which is important for protecting infants who are not yet fully vaccinated and others who are unable to undergo vaccination for medical or other reasons. Australia is unique in employing financial incentives to (...)
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  • Mandatory childhood vaccination: Should Norway follow?Espen Gamlund, Karl Erik Müller, Kathrine Knarvik Paquet & Carl Tollef Solberg - 2020 - Etikk I Praksis - Nordic Journal of Applied Ethics 1:7-27.
    _Systematic public vaccination constitutes a tremendous health success, perhaps the greatest achievement of biomedicine so far. There is, however, room for improvement. Each year, 1.5 million deaths could be avoided with enhanced immunisation coverage. In recent years, many countries have introduced mandatory childhood vaccination programmes in an attempt to avoid deaths. In Norway, however, the vaccination programme has remained voluntary. Our childhood immunisation programme covers protection for twelve infectious diseases, and Norwegian children are systematically immunised from six weeks to sixteen (...)
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  • Damaging the Future: The Health Rights of Children and the Issue of Short-Termism; Issues Facing Australian Bioethicists.Sally Dalton-Brown - 2018 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 27 (3):440-446.
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