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Beyond Selflessness: Reading Nietzsche’s Genealogy

Oxford University Press (2005)

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  1. Was Schopenhauer a Kantian Ethicist?Sandra Shapshay - 2020 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 28 (2):168-187.
    ABSTRACTCommentators have generally seen the compassionate person as a second-rate character vis-à-vis the ascetic ‘saint’ who denies the will-to-life and resigns from willing altogether in Schopen...
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  • Life, the Unhistorical, the Suprahistorical: Nietzsche on History.Joseph Ward - 2013 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 21 (1):64 - 91.
    (2013). Life, the Unhistorical, the Suprahistorical: Nietzsche on History. International Journal of Philosophical Studies: Vol. 21, No. 1, pp. 64-91. doi: 10.1080/09672559.2012.744532.
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  • Force and Objectivity: On Impact, Form, and Receptivity to Nature in Science and Art.Eli I. Lichtenstein - 2019 - Dissertation, University of Michigan
    Many praise science for its systematic drive to objectivity. But scientific objectivity is in fact valuable mainly as a species of objectivity in a broader sense, which extends to aesthetic experience and artistic forms of creativity. Objectivity should be understood as outwardness, or receptivity to basic features of the world. Scientific objectivity is receptivity to basic features of the world specifically by adopting their ‘point of view’. It is not a ‘view from nowhere’, or universally-valid perspective. Nor is it a (...)
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  • The Body of Ideas: Nietzsche, Embodiment, and the Genealogical Method.Matthew Kelley - unknown
    How are we to understand Nietzsche’s ubiquitous use of physiological language and imagery in On the Genealogy of Morality? I claim that Nietzsche’s use of physiological language is a crucial element of the method of historical investigation he develops. If Nietzsche’s genealogy attends to the practices of moral concepts, then the physiological undergoing of those practices will be important data for the genealogist. In other words, in Nietzsche’s critical-historical investigation of morality, accounts of physiological experience will be crucial for having (...)
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  • Normativity for Nietzschean Free Spirits.Simon Robertson - 2011 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 54 (6):591-613.
    A significant portion of recent literature on Nietzsche is devoted to his metaethical views, both critical and positive. This article explores one aspect of his positive metaethics. The specific thesis defended is that Nietzsche is, or is plausibly cast as, a reasons internalist. This, very roughly, is the view that what an agent has normative reason to do depends on that agent's motivational repertoire. Section I sketches some of the metaethical terrain most relevant to Nietzsche's organising ethical project, his “revaluation (...)
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  • Nietzsche’s English Genealogy of Truthfulness.Matthieu Queloz - forthcoming - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie.
    This paper aims to increase our understanding of the genealogical method by taking a developmental approach to Nietzsche’s genealogical methodology and reconstructing an early instance of it: Nietzsche’s genealogy of truthfulness in On Truth and Lie. Placing this essay against complementary remarks from his notebooks, I show that Nietzsche’s early use of the genealogical method concerns imagined situations before documented history, aims to reveal practical necessity before contingency, and focuses on vindication before it turns to subversion or problematization. I argue (...)
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  • Disinterestedness and Objectivity.Daniel Came - 2009 - European Journal of Philosophy 17 (1):91-100.
  • A Genealogia Como Programa de Pesquisa Naturalista.André Luís Mota Itaparica - 2018 - Discurso 48 (2):25-41.
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  • Nietzsche's Constructive Philosophy: Self-Understanding and the Sovereign Individual.Walter Duhaime - unknown
    There is an apparent disagreement between recent commentators who find in Nietzsche both a constructive philosophy and a compatibilist account of freedom, and Brian Leiter’s reading that rejects both. The reason for this disagreement, I argue, is that Leiter’s “illiberal” view is limited in scope to Nietzsche’s critical philosophy, while Nietzsche also has a constructive philosophy aimed at select readers. I read Nietzsche’s critical philosophy as targeting the metaphysical entities that underpin asceticism and herd values, not the mental states and (...)
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  • Nietzsche’s Naturalism Reconsidered.Brian Leiter - 2013 - In Ken Gemes & John Richardson (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Nietzsche. Oxford University Press.
    This article revisits the author’s influential account of Nietzche as a philosophical naturalist. It identifies the sources of Nietzsche’s position in the German naturalism of the mid-nineteenth century, in particular the work of Friedrich Lange. His naturalism is, however, “speculative” in that he postulates causal mechanisms not confirmed by science. Nietzsche’s ambition to explain morality naturalistically coexists with a “therapeutic” ambition to induce some readers to escape from morality. The article also addresses doubts that might arise against reading Nietzsche as (...)
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  • Nietzsche on Nihilism: A Unifying Thread.Andrew Huddleston - 2019 - Philosophers' Imprint 19.
    Nihilism is one of Nietzsche’s foremost philosophical concerns. But characterizing it proves elusive. His nihilists include those in despair in the wake of the “death of God.” Yet they also include believing Christians. We have, among these nihilists, those fervently committed to frameworks of cosmic meaning. But we also have those who lack any such commitment, epitomized in the “last man.” We have those who want to escape this life. And we have those who wouldn’t dream of such a prospect. (...)
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  • Nietzsche's Philosophical Psychology.Paul Katsafanas - 2013 - In John Richardson & Ken Gemes (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Nietzsche. Oxford University Press. pp. 727-755.
    Freud claimed that the concept of drive is "at once the most important and the most obscure element of psychological research." It is hard to think of a better proof of Freud's claim than the work of Nietzsche, which provides ample support for the idea that the drive concept is both tremendously important and terribly obscure. Although Nietzsche's accounts of agency and value everywhere appeal to drives, the concept has not been adequately explicated. I remedy this situation by providing an (...)
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  • Nietzsche and Contemporary Metaethics.Alex Silk - 2018 - In Paul Katsafanas (ed.), Routledge Philosophical Minds: The Nietzschean Mind. Routledge.
    Recent decades have witnessed a flurry of interest in Nietzsche's metaethics — his views, if any, on metaphysical, epistemological, semantic, and psychological issues about normativity and normative language and judgment. Various authors have highlighted a tension between Nietzsche's metaethical views about value and his ardent endorsement of a particular evaluative perspective: Although Nietzsche makes apparently "antirealist" claims to the effect that there are no evaluative facts, he vehemently engages in evaluative discourse and enjoins the "free spirits" to create values. Nearly (...)
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  • On Nietzsche, Homer, and Dissimulation.A. Van Fossen Joel - unknown
    In this thesis, I focus on two undervalued aspects of Nietzsche’s admiration of the ancient Greeks: the healthy psychology of the Greeks, and the origins of this health in Homeric poetry. I argue that Homer was a cultural physician for the ancient Greeks and is responsible for creating a new, healthy set of values through his epic poetry. In turn, these Homeric values brought Greece into its “tragic age”—a time during which Greek culture was “the highest authority for what we (...)
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  • Nietzsche and Moral Inquiry: Posing the Question of the Value of Our Moral Values.Adam Leach - 2018 - Dissertation, University of Essex
    The continued presence and importance of Christian moral values in our daily lives, coupled with the fact that faith in Christianity is in continual decline, raises the question as to why having lost faith in Christianity, we have also not lost faith in our Christian moral values. This question is also indicative of a more pressing phenomenon: not only have we maintained our faith in Christian values, we fail to see that the widespread collapse of Christianity should affect this faith. (...)
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  • The Relevance of History for Moral Philosophy: A Study of Nietzsche's Genealogy.Paul Katsafanas - 2011 - In Simon May (ed.), Nietzsche's 'On the Genealogy of Morality': A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.
    The Genealogy takes a historical form. But does the history play an essential role in Nietzsche's critique of modern morality? In this essay, I argue that the answer is yes. The Genealogy employs history in order to show that acceptance of modern morality was causally responsible for producing a dramatic change in our affects, drives, and perceptions. This change led agents to perceive actual increases in power as reductions in power, and actual decreases in power as increases in power. Moreover, (...)
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  • How Not to Affirm One's Life: Nietzsche and the Paradoxical Task of Life Affirmation.Allison Merrick - 2016 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 33 (1):63-78.
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  • Pulling Oneself Up by the Hair: Understanding Nietzsche on Freedom.Claire Kirwin - 2018 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 61 (1):82-99.
    Reading Nietzsche’s many remarks on freedom and free will, we face a dilemma. On the one hand, Nietzsche levels vehement attacks against the idea of the freedom of the will in several places throughout his writing. On the other hand, he frequently describes the sorts of people he admires as ‘free’ in various respects, as ‘free spirits’, or as in possession of a ‘free will’. So does Nietzsche think that we are or perhaps could be free, or not? I argue (...)
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  • Attitudes to Suffering: Parfit and Nietzsche.Christopher Janaway - 2017 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 60 (1-2):66-95.
    In On What Matters, Derek Parfit argues that Nietzsche does not disagree with central normative beliefs that ‘we’ hold. Such disagreement would threaten Parfit’s claim that normative beliefs are known by intuition. However, Nietzsche defends a conception of well-being that challenges Parfit’s normative claim that suffering is bad in itself for the sufferer. Nietzsche recognizes the phenomenon of ‘growth through suffering’ as essential to well-being. Hence, removal of all suffering would lead to diminished well-being. Parfit claims that if Nietzsche understood (...)
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  • The Passions and Disinterest: From Kantian Free Play to Creative Determination by Power, Via Schiller and Nietzsche.Eli I. Lichtenstein - 2019 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 6:249-279.
    I argue that Nietzsche’s criticism of the Kantian theory of disinterested pleasure in beauty reflects his own commitment to claims that closely resemble certain Kantian aesthetic principles, specifically as reinterpreted by Schiller. I show that Schiller takes the experience of beauty to be disinterested both (1) insofar as it involves impassioned ‘play’ rather than desire-driven ‘work’, and (2) insofar as it involves rational-sensuous (‘aesthetic’) play rather than mere physical play. In figures like Nietzsche, Schiller’s generic notion of play—which is itself (...)
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  • Nihilism and the Ascetic Ideal: On the Value of Asceticism in Nietzschean Genealogy.Clademir Araldi - 2019 - Filosofia Unisinos 20 (2).
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  • The Relation Between Sovereignty and Guilt in Nietzsche's Genealogy.Gabriel Zamosc - 2012 - European Journal of Philosophy 20 (S1):E107-e142.
    This paper interprets the relation between sovereignty and guilt in Nietzsche's Genealogy. I argue that, contrary to received opinion, Nietzsche was not opposed to the moral concept of guilt. I analyse Nietzsche's account of the emergence of the guilty conscience out of a pre-moral bad conscience. Drawing attention to Nietzsche's references to many different forms of conscience and analogizing to his account of punishment, I propose that we distinguish between the enduring and the fluid elements of a ‘conscience’, defining the (...)
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  • Janaway on Perspectivism.Ken Gemes - 2009 - European Journal of Philosophy 17 (1):101-112.
  • Naturalism, Method and Genealogy in Beyond Selflessness.P. J. E. Kail - 2009 - European Journal of Philosophy 17 (1):113-120.
    The full-text of this article is not currently available in ORA, but you may be able to access the article via the publisher copy link on this record page. Citation: Kail, P. J. E. . 'Naturalism, method and genealogy in Beyond Selflessness', European Journal of Philosophy, 17, 113-120. Copyright © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
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  • Responses to Commentators.Christopher Janaway - 2009 - European Journal of Philosophy 17 (1):132-151.
    The article discusses issues raised by Daniel Came, Ken Gemes, Peter Kail, and Stephen Mulhall in commentaries on Janaway, Beyond Selflessness: Reading Nietzsche's "Genealogy" (2008). The main topics are disinterestedness, aesthetic experience, perspectivism, affects and drives, the self, genealogical method, naturalistic psychology, and Nietzsche's rhetoric. The article argues that Nietzsche's criticisms of the conception of aesthetic experience as disinterested are justified, in particular his criticisms of Schopenhauer. Nietzsche's rejection of disinterestedness is linked to his claim that there is "only a (...)
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