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  1. Clown’s View as Respiciō: Looking Respectfully to and After People with Dementia.Ruud Hendriks - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (2):207-217.
    Clowns seem suspect when it comes to respect. The combination of clowning and people with dementia may seem especially suspicious. In this argument, I take potential concerns about clowning in dementia care as an opportunity to explore the meaning of a respectful approach of people with dementia. Our word ‘respect’ is derived from the Latin respiciō, meaning ‘looking back’ or ‘seeing again’, as well as ‘looking after’ or ‘having regard’ for someone or something. I build upon this double meaning of (...)
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  • Want of Care: An Essay on Wayward Action.Gabriel S. Mendlow - 2014 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (2):299-310.
    Philosophers have taken little heed of the fact that people often act contrary to their better judgment not because they suffer a volitional infirmity like weakness of will or compulsion but instead because they care too little about what they judge best (they are unconcerned) or they care too much about something else (they are compromised). Unconcerned and compromised action, being varieties of akratic action that do not involve volitional infirmity, are phenomena worth examining not only in their own right (...)
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  • Demented patients and the quandaries of identity: setting the problem, advancing a proposal.Giovanni Boniolo - 2021 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 43 (1):1-16.
    In the paper, after clarifying terms such as ‘identity’, ‘self’ and ‘personhood’, I propose an empirical account of identity based on the notion of “whole phenotype”. This move allows one to claim the persistence of the individuals before and after their being affected by dementia. Furthermore, I show how this account permits us to address significant questions related to demented individuals’ loss of the capacity of moral decisions.
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  • Demenz, Personalität und Praktische Selbstverhältnisse. Eine Auseinandersetzung mit den Möglichkeiten und Grenzen der Patientenautonomie Demenzbetroffener.Daniela Ringkamp - 2017 - Ethik in der Medizin 29 (2):119-132.
    ZusammenfassungAusgehend von den Positionen Ronald Dworkins, Rebecca Dressers und Agnieszka Jaworskas untersucht der Beitrag das Spannungsverhältnis zwischen vorgängigem und aktualem Selbstbestimmungsrecht demenzkranker Patienten und verbindet die Diskussion über das Autonomiepotential der Betroffenen mit einer Theorie praktischer Selbstverhältnisse, die die Patienten zumindest in den Anfangs- und den mittleren Stadien der Krankheit aufrechterhalten können. Theoretisches Grundgerüst für die Auseinandersetzung mit den Möglichkeiten und Grenzen der Patientenautonomie Demenzkranker ist dabei zunächst die Opposition zwischen Äquivalenz- und Nichtäquivalenztheorien der Personalität, in die sich auch die (...)
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  • A Pluralist Account of the Basis of Moral Status.Giacomo Floris - 2021 - Philosophical Studies 178 (6):1859-1877.
    Standard liberal theories of justice rest on the assumption that only those beings that hold the capacity for moral personality have moral status and therefore are right-holders. As many pointed out, this has the disturbing implication of excluding a wide range of entities from the scope of justice. Call this the under-inclusiveness objection. This paper provides a response to the under-inclusiveness objection and illustrates its implications for liberal theories of justice. In particular, the paper defends two claims: first, it argues (...)
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  • The Importance of What They Care About.Matthew Noah Smith - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 165 (2):297-314.
    Many forms of contemporary morality treat the individual as the fundamental unit of moral importance. Perhaps the most striking example of this moral vision of the individual is the contemporary global human rights regime, which treats the individual as, for all intents and purposes, sacrosanct. This essay attempts to explore one feature of this contemporary understanding of the moral status of the individual, namely the moral significance of a subject’s actual affective states, and in particular her cares and commitments. I (...)
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  • If You Can't Change What You Believe, You Don't Believe It.Grace Helton - 2020 - Noûs 54 (3):501-526.
    I develop and defend the view that subjects are necessarily psychologically able to revise their beliefs in response to relevant counter-evidence. Specifically, subjects can revise their beliefs in response to relevant counter-evidence, given their current psychological mechanisms and skills. If a subject lacks this ability, then the mental state in question is not a belief, though it may be some other kind of cognitive attitude, such as a supposi-tion, an entertained thought, or a pretense. The result is a moderately revisionary (...)
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  • Alzheimer's Disease and Socially Extended Mentation.James Lindemann Nelson - 2009 - Metaphilosophy 40 (3-4):462-474.
  • Agency and Moral Relationship in Dementia.Bruce Jennings - 2009 - Metaphilosophy 40 (3-4):425-437.
    This essay examines the goals of care and the exercise of guardianship authority in the long-term care of persons with Alzheimer's disease and other forms of chronic, progressive dementia. It counters philosophical views that deny both agency and personhood to individuals with Alzheimer's on definitional or analytic conceptual grounds. It develops a specific conception of the quality of life and offers a critique of hedonic conceptions of quality of life and models of guardianship that are based on a hedonic legal (...)
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  • Self-Control and Overcontrol: Conceptual, Ethical, and Ideological Issues in Positive Psychology.Michael Brownstein - 2018 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 9 (3):585-606.
    In what they call their “manual of the sanities”—a positive psychology handbook describing contemporary research on strengths of character—Christopher Peterson and Martin Seligman argue that “there is no true disadvantage of having too much self-control.” This claim is widely endorsed in the research literature. I argue that it is false. My argument proceeds in three parts. First, I identify conceptual confusion in the definition of self-control, specifically as it pertains to the claim that you cannot be too self-controlled. Second, I (...)
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  • Responsibility for Forgetting.Samuel Murray, Elise D. Murray, Gregory Stewart, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Felipe De Brigard - 2019 - Philosophical Studies 176 (5):1177-1201.
    In this paper, we focus on whether and to what extent we judge that people are responsible for the consequences of their forgetfulness. We ran a series of behavioral studies to measure judgments of responsibility for the consequences of forgetfulness. Our results show that we are disposed to hold others responsible for some of their forgetfulness. The level of stress that the forgetful agent is under modulates judgments of responsibility, though the level of care that the agent exhibits toward performing (...)
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  • Psychopathy: Morally Incapacitated Persons.Heidi Maibom - 2017 - In Thomas Schramme & Steven Edwards (eds.), Handbook of the Philosophy of Medicine. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 1109-1129.
    After describing the disorder of psychopathy, I examine the theories and the evidence concerning the psychopaths’ deficient moral capacities. I first examine whether or not psychopaths can pass tests of moral knowledge. Most of the evidence suggests that they can. If there is a lack of moral understanding, then it has to be due to an incapacity that affects not their declarative knowledge of moral norms, but their deeper understanding of them. I then examine two suggestions: it is their deficient (...)
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  • Primum Non Nocere Mortuis: Bioethics and the Lives of the Dead.Richard H. Dees - 2019 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 44 (6):732-755.
    advanced directivesend-of-life decisionsharming the deadposthumous reproductiontransplant ethics.
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  • What’s Good for Them? Best Interests and Severe Disorders of Consciousness.Jennifer Hawkins - 2016 - In Walter Sinnott Armstrong (ed.), Finding Consciousness. Oxford, UK: pp. 180-206.
    I consider the current best interests of patients who were once thought to be either completely unaware (to be in PVS) or only minimally aware (MCS), but who, because of advanced fMRI studies, we now suspect have much more “going on” inside their minds, despite no ability to communicate with the world. My goal in this chapter is twofold: (1) to set out and defend a framework that I think should always guide thinking about the best interests of highly cognitively (...)
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  • Covert Administration of Medication in Food: A Worthwhile Moral Gamble?Laura Guidry-Grimes, Megan Dean & Elizabeth Kaye Victor - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (6):389-393.
    The covert administration of medication occurs with incapacitated patients without their knowledge, involving some form of deliberate deception in disguising or hiding the medication. Covert medication in food is a relatively common practice globally, including in institutional and homecare contexts. Until recently, it has received little attention in the bioethics literature, and there are few laws or rules governing the practice. In this paper, we discuss significant, but often overlooked, ethical issues related to covert medication in food. We emphasise the (...)
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  • Eudaimonia and well-being: questioning the moral authority of advance directives in dementia.Philippa Byers - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (1):23-37.
    This paper revisits Ronald Dworkin’s influential position that a person’s advance directive for future health care and medical treatment retains its moral authority beyond the onset of dementia, even when respecting this authority involves foreshortening the life of someone who is happy and content and who no longer remembers or identifies with instructions included within the advance directive. The analysis distils a eudaimonist perspective from Dworkin’s argument and traces variations of this perspective in further arguments for the moral authority of (...)
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  • Cognitive Transformation, Dementia, and the Moral Weight of Advance Directives.Emily Walsh - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (8):54-64.
    Dementia patients in the moderate-late stage of the disease can, and often do, express different preferences than they did at the onset of their condition. The received view in the philosophical literature argues that advance directives which prioritize the patient’s preferences at onset ought to be given decisive moral weight in medical decision-making. Clinical practice, on the other hand, favors giving moral weight to the preferences expressed by dementia patients after onset. The purpose of this article is to show that (...)
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  • The Principle of Autonomy and Behavioural Variant Frontotemporal Dementia.Veljko Dubljević - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (2):271-282.
    Behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia is characterized by an absence of obvious cognitive impairment and presence of symptoms such as disinhibition, social inappropriateness, personality changes, hyper-sexuality, and hyper-orality. Affected individuals do not feel concerned enough about their actions to be deterred from violating social norms, and their antisocial behaviours are most likely caused by the neurodegenerative processes in the frontal and anterior temporal lobes. BvFTD patients present a challenge for the traditional notion of autonomy and the medical and criminal justice systems. (...)
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  • Autism, Neurodiversity, and Equality Beyond the "Normal".Andrew Fenton & Tim Krahn - 2007 - Journal of Ethics in Mental Health 2 (2):2.
    “Neurodiversity” is associated with the struggle for the civil rights of all those diagnosed with neurological or neurodevelopmental disorders. Two basic approaches in the struggle for what might be described as “neuro-equality” are taken up in the literature: There is a challenge to current nosology that pathologizes all of the phenotypes associated with neurological or neurodevelopmental disorders ); there is a challenge to those extant social institutions that either expressly or inadvertently model a social hierarchy where the interests or needs (...)
     
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  • The Implausibility of Response Shifts in Dementia Patients.Karin Rolanda Jongsma, Mirjam A. G. Sprangers & Suzanne van de Vathorst - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (9):597-600.
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  • Medical Paternalism - Part 1.Daniel Groll - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (3):194-203.
    Medical clinicians – doctors, nurses, nurse practitioners etc. – are charged to act for the good of their patients. But not all ways of acting for a patient's good are on par: some are paternalistic; others are not. What does it mean to act paternalistically, both in general and specifically in a medical context? And when, if ever, is it permissible for a clinician to act paternalistically? -/- This paper deals with the first question, with a special focus on paternalism (...)
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  • Further Reflections: Surrogate Decisionmaking When Significant Mental Capacities Are Retained.Jennifer Hawkins - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (1):192-198.
    Mackenzie Graham has made an important contribution to the literature on decisionmaking for patients with disorders of consciousness. He argues, and I agree, that decisions for unresponsive patients who are known to retain some degree of covert awareness ought to focus on current interests, since such patients likely retain the kinds of mental capacities that in ordinary life command our current respect and attention. If he is right, then it is not appropriate to make decisions for such patients by appealing (...)
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  • Advance Directives, Dementia, and Physician‐Assisted Death.Paul T. Menzel & Bonnie Steinbock - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (2):484-500.
    Physician-assisted suicide laws in Oregon and Washington require the person's current competency and a prognosis of terminal illness. In The Netherlands voluntariness and unbearable suffering are required for euthanasia. Many people are more concerned about the loss of autonomy and independence in years of severe dementia than about pain and suffering in their last months. To address this concern, people could write advance directives for physician-assisted death in dementia. Should such directives be implemented even though, at the time, the person (...)
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  • Advance Directives, Dementia, and Physician-Assisted Death.Paul T. Menzel & Bonnie Steinbock - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (2):484-500.
    Almost all jurisdictions where physician-assisted death is legal require that the requesting individual be competent to make medical decisions at time of assistance. The requirement of contemporary competence is intended to ensure that PAD is limited to people who really want to die and have the cognitive ability to make a final choice of such enormous import. Along with terminal illness, defined as prognosis of death within six months, contemporary competence is regarded as an important safeguard against mistake and abuse, (...)
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  • Artificial Intelligence in Service of Human Needs: Pragmatic First Steps Toward an Ethics for Semi-Autonomous Agents.Travis N. Rieder, Brian Hutler & Debra J. H. Mathews - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 11 (2):120-127.
  • Memory-Modulation: Self-Improvement or Self-Depletion?Andrea Lavazza - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
  • Advance Decisions in Dementia: When the Past Conflicts with the Present.George Gillett - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (3):204-208.
    As the prevalence of dementia increases across the Western world, there is a growing interest in advance care planning, by which patients may make decisions on behalf of their future selves. Under which ethical principles is this practice justified? I assess the justification for advance care planning put forward by the philosopher Ronald Dworkin, which he rationalises through an integrity-based conception of autonomy. I suggest his judgement is misguided by arguing in favour of two claims. First, that patients with dementia (...)
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  • The Unfeasibility of Requests for Euthanasia in Advance Directives.J. J. M. van Delden - 2004 - Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (5):447-451.
    In April 2002 a new law regarding euthanasia came into effect in the Netherlands. This law holds that euthanasia remains a criminal offence unless it is performed by a physician who acts according to six specified rules of due care and reports the case to a review committee. The six rules of due care are similar to those of the previous regulation and are largely based on jurisprudence. Completely new, however, is the article concerning a competent patient who has written (...)
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  • Carers’ Responses to Shifting Identity in Dementia inIrisandAway From Her: Cultivating Stability or Embracing Change?David M. R. Orr & Yugin Teo - 2015 - Medical Humanities 41 (2):81-85.
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  • Overlap of Premature Birth and Permissible Abortion.O. Collyns, G. Gillett & B. Darlow - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (6):343-347.
    Abortion is permitted in many jurisdictions after the age at which an infant is viable on the basis of intensive neonatal care techniques. Does this cause special concerns for those involved in perinatal care and termination of pregnancy services or is the overlap mainly an abstract issue fretted over by ethicists and academics? In order to explore this question, a group of clinicians involved in this area of care were interviewed and their interviews analysed using qualitative measures. The clinicians concerned (...)
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  • Patientenverfügungen Und Advance Care Planning Bei Demenz Und Anderen Kognitiven BeeinträchtigungenAdvance Directives and Advance Care Planning in Patients with Dementia and Other Cognitive Impairments.Dieter Birnbacher - 2016 - Ethik in der Medizin 28 (4):283-294.
    ZusammenfassungPatientenverfügungen für spätere Zustände schwerer kognitiver Beeinträchtigungen, wie sie für Spätphasen der Demenz typisch sind, stoßen auf weitergehende Vorbehalte als Patientenverfügungen für anderweitige Zustände eingeschränkter Einwilligungsfähigkeit. Einer der Gründe dafür scheinen die ethischen und psychologischen Konflikte im Gefolge von Patientenverfügungen zu sein, mit denen Patienten in gesunden Tagen für bestimmte Phasen der Erkrankung die Nichtbehandlung interkurrenter Erkrankungen oder die Unterlassung künstlicher Ernährung verfügt haben, während sich unter den in der Patientenverfügung gemeinten Bedingungen keine Anzeichen finden, dass sie unter ihrer Situation (...)
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  • Advanced Care Planning: Promoting Autonomy in Caring for People with Dementia.Francesca Bosisio & Gaia Barazzetti - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (8):93-95.
    Volume 20, Issue 8, August 2020, Page 93-95.
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  • Why Should Adamancy of an Uninformed View Give Moral Weight?Sara Goering - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (8):78-79.
    Volume 20, Issue 8, August 2020, Page 78-79.
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  • Autonomy and Ulysses Arrangements.Lubomira V. Radoilska - 2012 - In Lubomira Radoilska (ed.), Autonomy and Mental Disorder. Oxford University Press. pp. 252-280.
    In this chapter, I articulate the structure of a general concept of autonomy and then reply to possible objections with reference to Ulysses arrangements in psychiatry. The line of argument is as follows. Firstly, I examine three alternative conceptions of autonomy: value-neutral, value-laden, and relational. Secondly, I identify two paradigm cases of autonomy and offer a sketch of its concept as opposed to the closely related freedom of action and intentional agency. Finally, I explain away the autonomy paradox, to which (...)
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  • Autonomy and the Moral Authority of Advance Directives.Eric Vogelstein - 2016 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 41 (5):500-520.
    Although advance directives are widely believed to be a key way to safeguard the autonomy of incompetent medical patients, significant questions exist about their moral authority. The main philosophical concern involves cases in which an incompetent patient no longer possesses the desires on which her advance directive was based. The question is, does that entail that prior expressions of medical choices are no longer morally binding? I believe that the answer is “yes.” I argue that a patient’s autonomy is not (...)
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  • Caregiving and Moral Distress for Family Caregivers During Early-Stage Alzheimer’s Disease.Chris Weigel - 2019 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 12 (2):74-91.
    That diseases such as Alzheimer’s present many kinds of vulnerabilities for the afflicted is perhaps too obvious to mention given that a person with Alzheimer’s disease eventually becomes dependent on others for most basic, everyday needs. The ensuing vulnerabilities have physical, cognitive, emotional, social, and legal aspects, as well as aspects concerning autonomy. Such diseases also present a wide range of vulnerabilities for caregivers across multiple domains. Caregivers are vulnerable, for example, to social isolation, physical exhaustion, stress, and loss of (...)
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  • Free Will, Death, and Immortality: The Role of Narrative.John Martin Fischer - 2005 - Philosophical Papers 34 (3):379-403.
    In this paper I explore in a preliminary way the interconnections among narrative explanation, narrative value, free will, an immortality. I build on the fascinating an suggestive work of David Velleman. I offer the hypothesis that our acting freely is what gives our lives a distinctive kind of value - narrative value. Free Will, then, is connected to the capacity to lead a meaningful life in a quite specific way: it is the ingredient which, when aded to others, enows us (...)
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  • Self and Embodiment: A Bio-Phenomenological Approach to Dementia.Stephan Millett - 2011 - Dementia 10 (4):509-522.
    Loss of self is widely regarded to be a consequence of dementia, and this perceived loss presents a variety of problems - not least because a clear understanding of the concept of self is elusive. This paper suggests a way to cut through problems that arise because we rely on conceptions of self in our understanding of the effects of dementia. It is proposed that we can avoid reliance on the concept of self through an approach based in in bio-phenomenology. (...)
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  • Would We Rather Lose Our Life Than Lose Our Self? Lessons From the Dutch Debate on Euthanasia for Patients with Dementia.Cees M. P. M. Hertogh, Marike E. de Boer, Rose-Marie Dröes & Jan A. Eefsting - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (4):48 – 56.
    This article reviews the Dutch societal debate on euthanasia/assisted suicide in dementia cases, specifically Alzheimer's disease. It discusses the ethical and practical dilemmas created by euthanasia requests in advance directives and the related inconsistencies in the Dutch legal regulations regarding euthanasia/assisted suicide. After an initial focus on euthanasia in advanced dementia, the actual debate concentrates on making euthanasia/assisted suicide possible in the very early stages of dementia. A review of the few known cases of assisted suicide of people with so-called (...)
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  • Personal Identity and Ethics.David Shoemaker - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    What justifies our holding a person morally responsible for some past action? Why am I justified in having a special prudential concern for some future persons and not others? Why do many of us think that maximizing the good within a single life is perfectly acceptable, but maximizing the good across lives is wrong? In these and other normative questions, it looks like any answer we come up with will have to make an essential reference to personal identity. So, for (...)
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  • Should the Late Stage Demented Be Punished for Past Crimes?Annette Dufner - 2013 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (1):137-150.
    The paper investigates whether it is plausible to hold the late stage demented criminally responsible for past actions. The concern is based on the fact that policy makers in the United States and in Britain are starting to wonder what to do with prison inmates in the later stages of dementia who do not remember their crimes anymore. The problem has to be expected to become more urgent as the population ages and the number of dementia patients increases. This paper (...)
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  • Rationality, Diagnosis and Patient Autonomy.Jillian Craigie & Lisa Bortolotti - 2014 - Oxford Handbook Psychiatric Ethics.
    In this chapter, our focus is the role played by notions of rationality in the diagnosis of mental disorders, and in the practice of overriding patient autonomy in psychiatry. We describe and evaluate different hypotheses concerning the relationship between rationality and diagnosis, raising questions about what features underpin psychiatric categories. These questions reinforce widely held concerns about the use of diagnosis as a justification for overriding autonomy, which have motivated a shift to mental incapacity as an alternative justification. However, this (...)
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  • Living Well with Dementia Together: Affiliation as a Fertile Functioning.Annie Austin - 2018 - Public Health Ethics 11 (2):139-150.
    Justice requires that public policy improve the lives of disadvantaged members of society. Dementia is a source of disadvantage, and a growing global public health challenge. This article examines the theoretical and ethical connections between theories of justice and public dementia policy. Disability in general, and dementia in particular, poses important challenges for theories of justice, especially social contract theories. First, the article argues that non-contractarian accounts of justice such as the Capabilities and Disadvantage approaches are better equipped than their (...)
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  • Demenz und personale Identität.Karsten Witt - 2018 - Zeitschrift Für Praktische Philosophie 5 (1):153-180.
    Viele Menschen halten Patientenverfügungen für ein geeignetes Mittel, um selbstbestimmt zu entscheiden, wie mit ihnen im Fall schwerer Demenz umgegangen werden soll. Die meisten Bioethiker stimmen ihnen zu: Demenzverfügungen seien Ausdruck der „verlängerten Autonomie“ der Patientin. Doch ob sie recht haben, ist unklar. Dem viel beachteten Identitätseinwand zufolge sind die Ausstellerin der Verfügung und ihre schwer demente Nachfolgerin numerisch verschieden: Sie sind zwei und nicht eins. Wenn das stimmt, kann die Ausstellerin nicht verfügen, wie mit ihr im Falle schwerer Demenz (...)
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  • Authenticating an Online Identity.Steve Matthews - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (10):39-41.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 10, Page 39-41, October 2012.
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  • Promising Ourselves, Promising Others.Jorah Dannenberg - 2015 - The Journal of Ethics 19 (2):159-183.
    Promising ourselves is familiar, yet some find it philosophically troubling. Though most of us take the promises we make ourselves seriously, it can seem mysterious how a promise made only to oneself could genuinely bind. Moreover, the desire to be bound by a promise to oneself may seem to expose an unflattering lack of trust in oneself. In this paper I aim to vindicate self-promising from these broadly skeptical concerns. Borrowing Nietzsche’s idea of a memory of the will, I suggest (...)
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  • Value Judgements and Conceptual Tensions: Decision-Making in Relation to Hospital Discharge for People with Dementia.Helen Greener, Marie Poole, Charlotte Emmett, John Bond, Stephen J. Louw & Julian C. Hughes - 2012 - Clinical Ethics 7 (4):166-174.
    We reflect, using a vignette, on conceptual tensions and the value judgements that lie behind difficult decisions about whether or not the older person with dementia should return home or move into long-term care following hospital admission. The paper seeks, first, to expose some of the difficulties arising from the assessment of residence capacity, particularly around the nature of evaluative judgements and conceptual tensions inherent in the legal approach to capacity. Secondly, we consider the assessment of best interests around place (...)
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  • Is an Account of Identity Necessary for Bioethics? What Post-Genomic Biomedicine Can Teach Us.Giovanni Boniolo - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (3):401-411.
    Is a theory of identity necessary for bioethics? In this paper I investigate that question starting from an empirical explication of identity based on post-genomics, in particular on epigenetics. After analysing whether the classic problems a theory of identity has to cope with also affect the proposed epigenetic account of identity, I deal with three topics to offer an insight on the relationship between that account and bioethics.
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  • Claims About Surrogate Decision-Making Accuracy Require Empirical Evidence.Adam Feltz & Taylor Abt - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (10):41-43.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 10, Page 41-43, October 2012.
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  • In the Balance: Weighing Preferences of Decisionally Incapacitated Patients.Laura Guidry‐Grimes - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (3):41-42.
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