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Agnieszka Jaworska (1999). Respecting the Margins of Agency: Alzheimer's Patients and the Capacity to Value.

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  1. If You Can't Change What You Believe, You Don't Believe It.Grace Helton - forthcoming - Noûs.
    I develop and defend the view that subjects are necessarily psychologically able to revise their beliefs in response to relevant counter-evidence. Specifically, subjects can revise their beliefs in response to relevant counter-evidence, given their current psychological mechanisms and skills. If a subject lacks this ability, then the mental state in question is not a belief, though it may be some other kind of cognitive attitude, such as a supposi-tion, an entertained thought, or a pretense. The result is a moderately revisionary (...)
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  2.  91
    Responsibility for Forgetting.Samuel Murray, Elise D. Murray, Gregory Stewart, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Felipe De Brigard - forthcoming - Philosophical Studies:1-25.
    In this paper, we focus on whether and to what extent we judge that people are responsible for the consequences of their forgetfulness. We ran a series of behavioral studies to measure judgments of responsibility for the consequences of forgetfulness. Our results show that we are disposed to hold others responsible for some of their forgetfulness. The level of stress that the forgetful agent is under modulates judgments of responsibility, though the level of care that the agent exhibits toward performing (...)
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  3.  6
    Living Well with Dementia Together: Affiliation as a Fertile Functioning.Annie Austin - 2018 - Public Health Ethics 11 (2):139-150.
    Justice requires that public policy improve the lives of disadvantaged members of society. Dementia is a source of disadvantage, and a growing global public health challenge. This article examines the theoretical and ethical connections between theories of justice and public dementia policy. Disability in general, and dementia in particular, poses important challenges for theories of justice, especially social contract theories. First, the article argues that non-contractarian accounts of justice such as the Capabilities and Disadvantage approaches are better equipped than their (...)
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  4.  20
    Self-Control and Overcontrol: Conceptual, Ethical, and Ideological Issues in Positive Psychology.Michael Brownstein - 2018 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 9 (3):585-606.
    In what they call their “manual of the sanities”—a positive psychology handbook describing contemporary research on strengths of character—Christopher Peterson and Martin Seligman argue that “there is no true disadvantage of having too much self-control.” This claim is widely endorsed in the research literature. I argue that it is false. My argument proceeds in three parts. First, I identify conceptual confusion in the definition of self-control, specifically as it pertains to the claim that you cannot be too self-controlled. Second, I (...)
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  5.  6
    Advance Directives and Discrimination Against People with Dementia.Rebecca Dresser - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (4):26-27.
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  6.  7
    In the Balance: Weighing Preferences of Decisionally Incapacitated Patients.Laura Guidry‐Grimes - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (3):41-42.
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  7.  6
    Memory-Modulation: Self-Improvement or Self-Depletion?Andrea Lavazza - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  8.  5
    Of Meatballs, Autonomy, and Human Dignity: Neuroethics and the Boundaries of Decision Making Among Persons with Dementia.Andrea Lavazza & Massimo Reichlin - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 9 (2):88-95.
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  9.  2
    Of Meatballs And Invasive Neurotechnological Trials: Additional Considerations for Complex Clinical Decisions.John Noel M. Viaña, Adrian Carter & Frederic Gilbert - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 9 (2):100-104.
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  10.  3
    Clown’s View as Respiciō: Looking Respectfully to and After People with Dementia.Ruud Hendriks - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (2):207-217.
  11.  17
    Reframing Consent for Clinical Research: A Function-Based Approach.Scott Y. H. Kim, David Wendler, Kevin P. Weinfurt, Robert Silbergleit, Rebecca D. Pentz, Franklin G. Miller, Bernard Lo, Steven Joffe, Christine Grady, Sara F. Goldkind, Nir Eyal & Neal W. Dickert - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (12):3-11.
    Although informed consent is important in clinical research, questions persist regarding when it is necessary, what it requires, and how it should be obtained. The standard view in research ethics is that the function of informed consent is to respect individual autonomy. However, consent processes are multidimensional and serve other ethical functions as well. These functions deserve particular attention when barriers to consent exist. We argue that consent serves seven ethically important and conceptually distinct functions. The first four functions pertain (...)
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  12. Attributionism and Moral Responsibility for Implicit Bias.Michael Brownstein - 2016 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 7 (4):765-786.
    Implicit intergroup biases have been shown to impact social behavior in many unsettling ways, from disparities in decisions to “shoot” black and white men in a computer simulation to unequal gender-based evaluations of résumés and CVs. It is a difficult question whether, and in what way, agents are responsible for behaviors affected by implicit biases. I argue that in paradigmatic cases agents are responsible for these behaviors in the sense that the behavior is “attributable” to them. That is, behaviors affected (...)
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  13. Self-Expression: A Deep Self Theory of Moral Responsibility.Chandra Sripada - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (5):1203-1232.
    According to Dewey, we are responsible for our conduct because it is “ourselves objectified in action”. This idea lies at the heart of an increasingly influential deep self approach to moral responsibility. Existing formulations of deep self views have two major problems: They are often underspecified, and they tend to understand the nature of the deep self in excessively rationalistic terms. Here I propose a new deep self theory of moral responsibility called the Self-Expression account that addresses these issues. The (...)
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  14.  82
    Promising Ourselves, Promising Others.Jorah Dannenberg - 2015 - The Journal of Ethics 19 (2):159-183.
    Promising ourselves is familiar, yet some find it philosophically troubling. Though most of us take the promises we make ourselves seriously, it can seem mysterious how a promise made only to oneself could genuinely bind. Moreover, the desire to be bound by a promise to oneself may seem to expose an unflattering lack of trust in oneself. In this paper I aim to vindicate self-promising from these broadly skeptical concerns. Borrowing Nietzsche’s idea of a memory of the will, I suggest (...)
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  15.  78
    Medical Paternalism - Part 1.Daniel Groll - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (3):194-203.
    Medical clinicians – doctors, nurses, nurse practitioners etc. – are charged to act for the good of their patients. But not all ways of acting for a patient's good are on par: some are paternalistic; others are not. What does it mean to act paternalistically, both in general and specifically in a medical context? And when, if ever, is it permissible for a clinician to act paternalistically? -/- This paper deals with the first question, with a special focus on paternalism (...)
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  16.  35
    Want of Care: An Essay on Wayward Action. [REVIEW]Gabriel S. Mendlow - 2014 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (2):299-310.
    Philosophers have taken little heed of the fact that people often act contrary to their better judgment not because they suffer a volitional infirmity like weakness of will or compulsion but instead because they care too little about what they judge best (they are unconcerned) or they care too much about something else (they are compromised). Unconcerned and compromised action, being varieties of akratic action that do not involve volitional infirmity, are phenomena worth examining not only in their own right (...)
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  17.  5
    Advance Directives, Dementia, and Withholding Food and Water by Mouth.Paul T. Menzel & M. Colette Chandler-Cramer - 2014 - Hastings Center Report 44 (3):23-37.
  18.  32
    Is an Account of Identity Necessary for Bioethics? What Post-Genomic Biomedicine Can Teach Us.Giovanni Boniolo - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (3):401-411.
    Is a theory of identity necessary for bioethics? In this paper I investigate that question starting from an empirical explication of identity based on post-genomics, in particular on epigenetics. After analysing whether the classic problems a theory of identity has to cope with also affect the proposed epigenetic account of identity, I deal with three topics to offer an insight on the relationship between that account and bioethics.
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  19. Ethical Issues in the Introduction of Case Management for Elderly People.A. Corvol, G. Moutel, D. Gagnon, M. Nugue, O. Saint-Jean & D. Somme - 2013 - Nursing Ethics 20 (1):0969733012452685.
    As case management is under development in France for elderly people, this study sets out to identify and analyse key situations responsible for ethical dilemmas for French case managers. We based our study on the analyses of individual interviews made with case managers and focus-group discussions, bringing together all case managers working in local organisations running for at least a year. We identified three situations giving rise to ethical dilemmas: in the order of importance, the refusals of care, the practicalities (...)
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  20. Should the Late Stage Demented Be Punished for Past Crimes?Annette Dufner - 2013 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (1):137-150.
    The paper investigates whether it is plausible to hold the late stage demented criminally responsible for past actions. The concern is based on the fact that policy makers in the United States and in Britain are starting to wonder what to do with prison inmates in the later stages of dementia who do not remember their crimes anymore. The problem has to be expected to become more urgent as the population ages and the number of dementia patients increases. This paper (...)
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  21.  6
    'Like a Prison Without Bars': Dementia and Experiences of Dignity.Anne Kari T. Heggestad, Per Nortvedt & Åshild Slettebø - 2013 - Nursing Ethics 20 (8):881-892.
    The aim of this article is to investigate how life in Norwegian nursing homes may affect experiences of dignity among persons with dementia. The study had a qualitative design and used a phenomenological and hermeneutic approach. Participant observation in two nursing home units was combined with qualitative interviews with five residents living in these units. The study took place between March and December 2010. The residents feel that their freedom is restricted, and they describe feelings of homesickness. They also experience (...)
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  22.  59
    Advance Directives, Dementia, and Physician‐Assisted Death.Paul T. Menzel & Bonnie Steinbock - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (2):484-500.
    Physician-assisted suicide laws in Oregon and Washington require the person's current competency and a prognosis of terminal illness. In The Netherlands voluntariness and unbearable suffering are required for euthanasia. Many people are more concerned about the loss of autonomy and independence in years of severe dementia than about pain and suffering in their last months. To address this concern, people could write advance directives for physician-assisted death in dementia. Should such directives be implemented even though, at the time, the person (...)
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  23.  24
    Advance Directives, Dementia, and Physician-Assisted Death.Paul T. Menzel & Bonnie Steinbock - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (2):484-500.
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  24.  75
    The Importance of What They Care About.Matthew Noah Smith - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 165 (2):297-314.
    Many forms of contemporary morality treat the individual as the fundamental unit of moral importance. Perhaps the most striking example of this moral vision of the individual is the contemporary global human rights regime, which treats the individual as, for all intents and purposes, sacrosanct. This essay attempts to explore one feature of this contemporary understanding of the moral status of the individual, namely the moral significance of a subject’s actual affective states, and in particular her cares and commitments. I (...)
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  25.  23
    Respecting One's Elders: In Search of an Ontological Explanation for the Asymmetry Between the Proper Treatment of Dependent Adults and Children.Audrey L. Anton - 2012 - Philosophical Papers 41 (3):397-419.
    Abstract The infantilization of older adults seems morally deplorable whereas very young children are appropriate recipients of such treatment. Children, we argue, are not mentally capable of acting autonomously and reasoning clearly. However, we have difficulty reconciling this justification with the fact that many of the elders whom we respect are mentally deficient in those very same ways. In this paper, I try to make sense of this asymmetry between our justifications for infantilizing the young and our conviction that our (...)
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  26.  71
    Value Judgements and Conceptual Tensions: Decision-Making in Relation to Hospital Discharge for People with Dementia.H. Greener, M. Poole, C. Emmett, J. Bond, S. J. Louw & J. C. Hughes - 2012 - Clinical Ethics 7 (4):166-174.
    We reflect, using a vignette, on conceptual tensions and the value judgements that lie behind difficult decisions about whether or not the older person with dementia should return home or move into long-term care following hospital admission. The paper seeks, first, to expose some of the difficulties arising from the assessment of residence capacity, particularly around the nature of evaluative judgements and conceptual tensions inherent in the legal approach to capacity. Secondly, we consider the assessment of best interests around place (...)
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  27.  13
    Authenticating an Online Identity.Steve Matthews - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (10):39-41.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 10, Page 39-41, October 2012.
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  28.  12
    Agency and Moral Relationship in Dementia.Bruce Jennings - 2009 - Metaphilosophy 40 (3-4):425-437.
    This essay examines the goals of care and the exercise of guardianship authority in the long-term care of persons with Alzheimer's disease and other forms of chronic, progressive dementia. It counters philosophical views that deny both agency and personhood to individuals with Alzheimer's on definitional or analytic conceptual grounds. It develops a specific conception of the quality of life and offers a critique of hedonic conceptions of quality of life and models of guardianship that are based on a hedonic legal (...)
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  29.  23
    Alzheimer's Disease and Socially Extended Mentation.James Lindemann Nelson - 2009 - Metaphilosophy 40 (3-4):462-474.
  30.  20
    Immersed Subjectivity and Engaged Narratives: Clinical Epistemology and Normative Intricacy.Per Nortvedt - 2003 - Nursing Philosophy 4 (2):129-136.