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  1. Dialogic Consensus in Medicine—A Justification Claim.Paul Walker & Terence Lovat - 2019 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 44 (1):71-84.
    The historical emphasis of medical ethics, based on substantive frameworks and principles derived from them, is no longer seen as sufficiently sensitive to the moral pluralism characteristic of our current era. We argue that moral decision-making in clinical situations is more properly derived from a process of dialogic consensus. This process entails an inclusive, noncoercive, and self-reflective dialogue within the community affected. In order to justify this approach, we make two claims—the first epistemic, and the second normative. The epistemic claim (...)
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  • Public, Experts, and Acceptance of Advanced Medical Technologies: The Case of Organ Transplant and Gene Therapy in Japan. [REVIEW]Hajime Sato, Akira Akabayashi & Ichiro Kai - 2006 - Health Care Analysis 14 (4):203-214.
    In 1997, after long social debates, the Japanese government enacted a law on organ transplantation from brain-dead bodies. Since 1993, on gene therapy, administrative agencies have issued a series of guidelines. This study seeks to elucidate when people became aware of the issues and when they formed their opinions on organ transplant and gene therapy. At the same time, it aims to examine at which point in time experts, those in university ethical committees and in academic societies, consider these technologies (...)
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  • Should We Be Talking About Ethics or About Morals?Paul Walker & Terence Lovat - 2017 - Ethics and Behavior 27 (5):436-444.
    This article seeks to revisit the distinction between the words ethics and morals. First, we understand the word ethics to be focused on the way we seek to live our own life, and hence to connote a relativistic and essentially subjective perspective, whereas we understand the word morals to be focused on the way we should live our lives together, especially through sensitivity to viewpoints other than our own. Second, we perceive a usefulness in such a differentiation when the ethical (...)
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  • Should HECs in Secular Institutions Seek Right-to-Life Advocates as Members?Kenneth De Ville - 1994 - HEC Forum 6 (5):318-320.
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  • Individualism, Subjectivism, Democracy, and "Helping" Professions.David Checkland - 1996 - Ethics and Behavior 6 (4):337 – 343.
    This article discusses the suggestion, expressed in the three preceding articles in this issue of Ethics & Behavior, that ethics as practiced in the helping professions requires greater organizational democratization. The relevance to this proposal of both a cognitive conception of democracy and an account of the nature of values that establishes their objectivity is also discussed.
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  • The Personal is the Organizational in the Ethics of Hospital Social Workers.Richard Walsh-Bowers, Amy Rossiter & Isaac Prilleltensky - 1996 - Ethics and Behavior 6 (4):321 – 335.
    Understanding the social context of clinical ethics is vital for making ethical discourse central in professional practice and for preventing harm. In this paper we present findings about clinical ethics from in depth interviews and consultation with 7 members of a hospital social work department. Workers gave different accounts of ethical dilemmas and resources for ethical decision making than did their managers, whereas workers and managers agreed on core-guiding ethical principles and on ideal situations for ethical discourse. We discuss the (...)
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  • Improving Fairness in Coverage Decisions: Performance Expectations for Quality Improvement.Matthew K. Wynia, Deborah Cummins, David Fleming, Kari Karsjens, Amber Orr, James Sabin, Inger Saphire-Bernstein & Renee Witlen - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (3):87-100.
    Patients and physicians often perceive the current health care system to be unfair, in part because of the ways in which coverage decisions appear to be made. To address this problem the Ethical Force Program, a collaborative effort to create quality improvement tools for ethics in health care, has developed five content areas specifying ethical criteria for fair health care benefits design and administration. Each content area includes concrete recommendations and measurable expectations for performance improvement, which can be used by (...)
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  • Preventing Harm and Promoting Ethical Discourse in the Helping Professions: Conceptual, Research, Analytical, and Action Frameworks.Isaac Prilleltensky, Amy Rossiter & Richard Walsh-Bowers - 1996 - Ethics and Behavior 6 (4):287-306.
  • Concepts of Personhood and Autonomy as They Apply to End-of-Life Decisions in Intensive Care.Paul Walker & Terence Lovat - 2015 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 18 (3):309-315.
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  • Deliberative Voting: Clarifying Consent in a Consensus Process.Alfred Moore & Kieran O'Doherty - 2014 - Journal of Political Philosophy 22 (3):302-319.
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