Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Bariatric Surgery for Obese Children and Adolescents: A Review of the Moral Challenges. [REVIEW]Bjørn Hofmann - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):18.
    BackgroundBariatric surgery for children and adolescents is becoming widespread. However, the evidence is still scarce and of poor quality, and many of the patients are too young to consent. This poses a series of moral challenges, which have to be addressed both when considering bariatric surgery introduced as a health care service and when deciding for treatment for young individuals. A question based (Socratic) approach is applied to reveal underlying moral issues that can be relevant to an open and transparent (...)
    Direct download (17 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Intervention, Integration and Translation in Obesity Research: Genetic, Developmental and Metaorganismal Approaches.Maureen O'Malley & Karola Stotz - 2011 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 6:2.
    Obesity is the focus of multiple lines of inquiry that have -- together and separately -- produced many deep insights into the physiology of weight gain and maintenance. We examine three such streams of research and show how they are oriented to obesity intervention through multilevel integrated approaches. The first research programme is concerned with the genetics and biochemistry of fat production, and it links metabolism, physiology, endocrinology and neurochemistry. The second account of obesity is developmental and draws together epigenetic (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Stuck in the Middle: The Many Moral Challenges With Bariatric Surgery.Bjørn Hofmann - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (12):3-11.
    Bariatric surgery is effective on short- and medium-term weight loss, reduction of comorbidities, and overall mortality. A large and increasing portion of the population is eligible for bariatric surgery, which increases instant health care costs. A review of the literature identifies a series of ethical challenges: unjust distribution of bariatric surgery, autonomy and informed consent, classification of obesity and selecting assessment endpoints, prejudice among health professionals, intervention in people's life-world, and medicalization of appearance. Bariatric surgery is particularly interesting because it (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  • Confessions of the Flesh and Biopedagogies: Discursive Constructions of Obesity on Nip/Tuck.G. Rail & M. Lafrance - 2009 - Medical Humanities 35 (2):76-79.
    Informed by the work of Michel Foucault, the authors discuss the Nip/Tuck episode entitled “Momma Boone” and how it discursively constructs “obesity”. They show how this popular media text can be understood as a crystallisation of the dominant discourse surrounding fat bodies. In the process, how the episode can be seen as a “biopedagogy” that instructs its viewers in how to think and feel about the fat body is examined. Foucault’s formulation of the confessional is seen to be useful to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Intervention, Integration and Translation in Obesity Research: Genetic, Developmental and Metaorganismal Approaches.Stotz Karola & A. O'Malley Maureen - 2011 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 6 (1):2.
    Obesity is the focus of multiple lines of inquiry that have -- together and separately -- produced many deep insights into the physiology of weight gain and maintenance. We examine three such streams of research and show how they are oriented to obesity intervention through multilevel integrated approaches. The first research programme is concerned with the genetics and biochemistry of fat production, and it links metabolism, physiology, endocrinology and neurochemistry. The second account of obesity is developmental and draws together epigenetic (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Obesity as a Socially Defined Disease: Philosophical Considerations and Implications for Policy and Care.Bjørn Hofmann - 2016 - Health Care Analysis 24 (1):86-100.
    Obesity has generated significant worries amongst health policy makers and has obtained increased attention in health care. Obesity is unanimously defined as a disease in the health care and health policy literature. However, there are pragmatic and not principled reasons for this. This warrants an analysis of obesity according to standard conceptions of disease in the literature of philosophy of medicine. According to theories and definitions of disease referring to internal processes, obesity is not a disease. Obesity undoubtedly can result (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations