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  1. From “Safe by Design” to Scientific Changes: Unforeseen Effects of Controversy Surrounding Nanotechnology in France.Marie-Gabrielle Suraud - 2019 - NanoEthics 13 (2):103-112.
    Based on fieldwork, this article highlights the unexpected effects of controversies about nanotechnology in France. These controversies stem in particular from a strong challenge to the field by civil society protests and criticism concerning environmental and health risks. One reason for this challenge is the specific difficulties in assessing the toxicity and ecotoxicity of nanomaterials. Civil society organizations have pushed for strictly controlling or stopping academic, industrial, or even basic research. They were not successful in this regard but their activities (...)
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  • Models of Public Engagement: Nanoscientists’ Understandings of Science–Society Interactions.Regula Burri - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (2):81-98.
    This paper explores how scientists perceive public engagement initiatives. By drawing on interviews with nanoscientists, it analyzes how researchers imagine science–society interactions in an early phase of technological development. More specifically, the paper inquires into the implicit framings of citizens, of scientists, and of the public in scientists’ discourses. It identifies four different models of how nanoscientists understand public engagement which are described as educational, paternalistic, elitist, and economistic. These models are contrasted with the dialog model of public engagement promoted (...)
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  • “Just Carbon”: Ideas About Graphene Risks by Graphene Researchers and Innovation Advisors.Rickard Arvidsson, Max Boholm, Mikael Johansson & Monica Lindh de Montoya - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (3):199-210.
    Graphene is a nanomaterial with many promising and innovative applications, yet early studies indicate that graphene may pose risks to humans and the environment. According to ideas of responsible research and innovation, all relevant actors should strive to reduce risks related to technological innovations. Through semi-structured interviews, we investigated the idea of graphene as a risk held by two types of key actors: graphene researchers and innovation advisors at universities, where the latter are facilitating the movement of graphene from the (...)
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