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  1. Envy: An Adversarial Review and Comparison of Two Competing Views.Jan Crusius, Manuel F. Gonzalez, Jens Lange & Yochi Cohen-Charash - forthcoming - Emotion Review.
    The nature of envy has recently been the subject of a heated debate. Some researchers see envy as a complex, yet unitary construct that despite being hostile in nature can lead to both hostile and...
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  • Emotions at the Service of Cultural Construction.Bernard Rimé - forthcoming - Emotion Review.
    Emotions signal flaws in the person’s anticipation systems, or in other words, in aspects of models of how the world works. As these models are essentially shared in society, emotional challenges e...
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  • Qualitative Analysis of Emotions: Fear and Thrill.Ralf C. Buckley - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • More Than Words : Evidence for a Stroop Effect of Prosody in Emotion Word Processing.Piera Filippi, Sebastian Ocklenburg, Daniel L. Bowling, Larissa Heege, Onur Güntürkün, Albert Newen & Bart de Boer - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (5):879-891.
  • More on James and the Physical Basis of Emotion.Rainer Reisenzein & Achim Stephan - 2014 - Emotion Review 6 (1):35-46.
  • Beyond Smiles: The Impact of Culture and Race in Embodying and Decoding Facial Expressions.Roberto Caldara - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (6):438-439.
    Understanding the very nature of the smile with an integrative approach and a novel model is a fertile ground for a new theoretical vision and insights. However, from this perspective, I challenge the authors to integrate culture and race in their model, because both factors would impact upon the embodying and decoding of facial expressions.
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  • The Proximate Mechanisms and Ultimate Functions of Smiles.Marc Mehu & Karim N'Diaye - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (6):454-455.
    Niedenthal et al's classification of smiles erroneously conflates psychological mechanisms and adaptive functions. This confusion weakens the rationale behind the types of smiles they chose to individuate, and it obfuscates the distinction between the communicative versus denotative nature of smiles and the role of perceived-gaze direction in emotion recognition.
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  • Cognitive Systems for Revenge and Forgiveness.Michael E. McCullough, Robert Kurzban & Benjamin A. Tabak - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (1):1-15.
    Minimizing the costs that others impose upon oneself and upon those in whom one has a fitness stake, such as kin and allies, is a key adaptive problem for many organisms. Our ancestors regularly faced such adaptive problems. One solution to this problem is to impose retaliatory costs on an aggressor so that the aggressor and other observers will lower their estimates of the net benefits to be gained from exploiting the retaliator in the future. We posit that humans have (...)
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  • Common Denominators in Research on Emotion Language: A Postscript.Anna Ogarkova & Philippe Borgeaud - 2009 - Social Science Information 48 (3):523-543.
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  • Respect as a Moral Response to Workplace Incivility.Leslie Sekerka & Marianne Marar Yacobian - forthcoming - Philosophy of Management.
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  • The Simulation of Smiles (SIMS) Model: Embodied Simulation and the Meaning of Facial Expression.Paula M. Niedenthal, Martial Mermillod, Marcus Maringer & Ursula Hess - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (6):417.
    Recent application of theories of embodied or grounded cognition to the recognition and interpretation of facial expression of emotion has led to an explosion of research in psychology and the neurosciences. However, despite the accelerating number of reported findings, it remains unclear how the many component processes of emotion and their neural mechanisms actually support embodied simulation. Equally unclear is what triggers the use of embodied simulation versus perceptual or conceptual strategies in determining meaning. The present article integrates behavioral research (...)
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  • Why so Complex? Emotional Mediation of Revenge, Forgiveness, and Reconciliation.Filippo Aureli & Colleen M. Schaffner - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (1):15-16.
  • Cross-Cultural Similarities and Differences.William Forde Thompson & Balkwill & Laura-Lee - 2010 - In Patrik N. Juslin & John Sloboda (eds.), Handbook of Music and Emotion: Theory, Research, Applications. Oxford University Press.
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  • Skiing and Thinking About It: Moment-to-Moment and Retrospective Analysis of Emotions in an Extreme Sport.Audun Hetland, Joar Vittersø, Simen Oscar Bø Wie, Eirik Kjelstrup, Matthias Mittner & Tove Irene Dahl - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • Is Affectivity Passive or Active?Robert Zaborowski - 2018 - Philosophia 46 (3):541-554.
    In this paper I adopt Aquinas’ explanation of passivity and activity by means of acts remaining in the agent and acts passing over into external matter. I use it to propose a divide between immanent-type and transcendent-type acts. I then touch upon a grammatical distinction between three kinds of verbs. To argue for the activity and passivity of affectivity I refer to the group that includes acts of transcendent-type and whose verbs in both voices possess affective meaning. In the end (...)
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  • Musical Friends and Foes: The Social Cognition of Affiliation and Control in Improvised Interactions.Jean-Julien Aucouturier & Clément Canonne - 2017 - Cognition 161:94-108.
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  • Trails of Social Science: The Visibility of Scientific Change in Criminological Journals.Robert Hogenraad, Dan Kaminski & Dean McKenzie - 1995 - Social Science Information 34 (4):663-685.
  • Autoethnography Helps Analyse Emotions.Ralf Buckley - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • Basic Emotions in Social Relationships, Reasoning, and Psychological Illnesses.Keith Oatley & Philip N. Johnson-Laird - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (4):424-433.
    The communicative theory of emotions postulates that emotions are communications both within the brain and between individuals. Basic emotions owe their evolutionary origins to social mammals, and they enable human beings to use repertoires of mental resources appropriate to recurring and distinctive kinds of events. These emotions also enable them to cooperate with other individuals, to compete with them, and to disengage from them. The human system of emotions has also grafted onto basic emotions propositional contents about the cause of (...)
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  • An Emotion's Emergence, Unfolding, and Potential for Empathy: A Study of Resentment by the “Psychologist of Avon”.Keith Oatley - 2009 - Emotion Review 1 (1):24-30.
    To understand human emotions we need, alongside appraisal, the concept of emergence (derivation from the expectations of relationships) and the concept of unfolding (of sequences that can be expressed as narratives). These processes can be seen in resentment, which has not been studied extensively in psychology. It is associated with envy, and it can be thought of as a kind of destructive anger. Such issues can be studied in works of literature: simulations of the social world in which emotions can (...)
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  • To Analyze Thrill, Define Extreme Sports.Ralf C. Buckley - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • Defining Emotion Concepts.Anna Wierzbicka - 1992 - Cognitive Science 16 (4):539-581.
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  • Meaning, Prototypes and the Future of Cognitive Science.Jaap van Brakel - 1991 - Minds and Machines 1 (3):233-57.
    In this paper I evaluate the soundness of the prototype paradigm, in particular its basic assumption that there are pan-human psychological essences or core meanings that refer to basic-level natural kinds, explaining why, on the whole, human communication and learning are successful. Instead I argue that there are no particular pan-human basic elements for thought, meaning and cognition, neither prototypes, nor otherwise. To illuminate my view I draw on examples from anthropology. More generally I argue that the prototype paradigm exemplifies (...)
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  • Communications to Self and Others: Emotional Experience and its Skills.Keith Oatley - 2009 - Emotion Review 1 (3):206-213.
    According to the Communicative Theory of Emotions, we experience emotions when events occur that are important for our goals and plans. A method of choice for studying these matters is the emotion diary. Emotions configure our cognitive systems and our relationships. Many of our emotions concern our relationships, and empathy is central to our experience of them. We do not always recognize our emotions or the emotions of others, but literary fiction can help improve our skills of recognition and understanding.
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  • Contempt: Derogating Others While Keeping Calm.Agneta Fischer & Roger Giner-Sorolla - 2016 - Emotion Review 8 (4):346-357.
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  • Anxiety and Depression: Toward Overlapping and Distinctive Features.Michael W. Eysenck & Małgorzata Fajkowska - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (7):1391-1400.
    ABSTRACTThis Special Issue of Cognition and Emotion addresses one of the cardinal concerns of affective science, which is overlapping and distinctive features of anxiety and depression. A central finding in the study of anxiety and depression is that they are moderately highly correlated with each other. This leads us to the question: What is behind this co-occurrence? Possible explanations relate to poor discriminant validity of measures; both emotional states are associated with negative affect; stressful life events; impaired cognitive processes; they (...)
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  • Toward an Ontological Interpretation of Dennett's Theory of Consciousness.Michael V. Antony - 2002 - Philosophia 29 (1-4):343-369.
    While "Consciousness Explained" has received an enormous amount of attention since its publication, there is still little agreement on what Dennett’s account of consciousness is. Most interpreters treat his view as an instance of one or another of the standard ontological positions (functionalism, behaviorism, eliminativism, instrumentalism). I believe a different metaphysical account underlies Dennett’s view, one that is important though ill-understood. In the paper I attempt to point in the direction of a proper characterization of that account through the use (...)
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  • Moral Courage in the Workplace: Moving to and From the Desire and Decision to Act.Leslie E. Sekerka & Richard P. Bagozzi - 2007 - Business Ethics 16 (2):132–149.
  • Language and Organisation of Filipino Emotion Concepts: Comparing Emotion Concepts and Dimensions Across Cultures.Timothy Church, Marcia S. Katigbak, Jose Alberto S. Reyes & Stacia M. Jensen - 1998 - Cognition and Emotion 12 (1):63-92.
  • Conjunction in the Language of Emotions.Gregory V. Jones & Maryanne Martin - 1992 - Cognition and Emotion 6 (5):369-386.
  • An Argument for Basic Emotions.Paul Ekman - 1992 - Cognition and Emotion 6 (3-4):169-200.
  • Basic Emotions, Rationality, and Folk Theory.P. N. Johnson-Laird & Keith Oatley - 1992 - Cognition and Emotion 6 (3-4):201-223.
  • Talking About Emotions: Semantics, Culture, and Cognition.Anna Wierzbicka - 1992 - Cognition and Emotion 6 (3-4):285-319.
  • Meaning, Prototypes and the Future of Cognitive Science.J. Brakel - 1991 - Minds and Machines 1 (3):233-257.
    In this paper I evaluate the soundness of the prototype paradigm, in particular its basic assumption that there are pan-human psychological essences or core meanings that refer to basic-level natural kinds, explaining why, on the whole, human communication and learning are successful. Instead I argue that there are no particular pan-human basic elements for thought, meaning and cognition, neither prototypes, nor otherwise. To illuminate my view I draw on examples from anthropology. More generally I argue that the prototype paradigm exemplifies (...)
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  • Moral Courage in the Workplace: Moving to and From the Desire and Decision to Act.Leslie E. Sekerka & Richard P. Bagozzi - 2007 - Business Ethics: A European Review 16 (2):132-149.
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  • Admiration and Adoration: Their Different Ways of Showing and Shaping Who We Are.Ines Schindler, Veronika Zink, Johannes Windrich & Winfried Menninghaus - 2013 - Cognition and Emotion 27 (1):85-118.
  • Studying the Emotion-Antecedent Appraisal Process: An Expert System Approach.Klaus R. Scherer - 1993 - Cognition and Emotion 7 (3-4):325-355.
  • Neuroscience Projections to Current Debates in Emotion Psychology.Klaus R. Scherer - 1993 - Cognition and Emotion 7 (1):1-41.
  • Semantic Primitives for Emotions: A Reply to Ortony and Clore.Keith Oatley & P. N. Johnson-Laird - 1990 - Cognition and Emotion 4 (2):129-143.
  • The Place of Appraisal in Emotion.Nico H. Frijda - 1993 - Cognition and Emotion 7 (3-4):357-387.
  • The Experience of Emotions in Everyday Life.Keith Oatley & Elaine Duncan - 1994 - Cognition and Emotion 8 (4):369-381.
  • On Oatley and Johnson-Laird's Theory of Emotion and Hierarchical Structures in the Affective Lexicon.Rainer Reisenzein - 1995 - Cognition and Emotion 9 (4):383-416.
  • Performance on the Emotional Stroop Task in Groups of Anxious, Expert, and Control Subjects: A Comparison of Computer and Card Presentation Formats.Tim Dalgleish - 1995 - Cognition and Emotion 9 (4):341-362.
  • Dimensions of Speech Perception: Semantic Associations in the Affective Lexicon.Lee H. Wurm - 1996 - Cognition and Emotion 10 (4):409-424.
  • The Experience of Emotions of Interdependence and Independence Following Interpersonal Errors in Italy and Anglophone Canada.Ilaria Grazzani-Gavazzi - 1999 - Cognition and Emotion 13 (1):49-63.
  • Relations and Dissociations Between Appraisal and Emotion Ratings of Reasonable and Unreasonable Anger and Guilt.Brian Parkinson - 1999 - Cognition and Emotion 13 (4):347-385.
  • The English Lexicon of Interpersonal Affect: Love, Etc.Christine Storm & Tom Storm - 2005 - Cognition and Emotion 19 (3):333-356.
  • Emotion Experience.Nico Frijda - 2005 - Cognition and Emotion 19 (4):473-497.
  • Beyond Prototypes and Classical Definitions: Evidence for a Theory-Based Representation of Emotion Concepts.Matthias Siemer - 2008 - Cognition and Emotion 22 (4):620-632.
  • The Structure of Emotion: An Empirical Comparison of Six Models.M. J. Power - 2006 - Cognition and Emotion 20 (5):694-713.