Citations of work:

L. Syd M. Johnson (2011). The Right to Die in the Minimally Conscious State.

6 found
Order:
Are we missing citations?

PhilPapers citations & references are currently in beta testing. We expect to add many more in the future.

Meanwhile, you can use our bibliography tool to import references for this or another work.

Or you can directly add citations for the above work:

Search for work by author name and title
Add directly by record ID

  1.  4
    Pure Experience and Disorders of Consciousness.Laura Specker Sullivan - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 9 (2):107-114.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  1
    Inference and Inductive Risk in Disorders of Consciousness.L. Syd M. Johnson - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 7 (1):35-43.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  3.  56
    Relative Values: Perspectives on a Neuroimaging Technology From Above and Within the Ethical Landscape.Gabrielle Samuel, Alan Cribb, John Owens & Clare Williams - 2016 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (3):407-418.
    In this paper we contribute to “sociology in bioethics” and help clarify the range of ways sociological work can contribute to ethics scholarship. We do this using a case study of an innovative neurotechnology, functional magnetic resonance imaging, and its use to attempt to diagnose and communicate with severely brain-injured patients. We compare empirical data from interviews with relatives of patients who have a severe brain injury with perspectives from mainstream bioethics scholars. We use the notion of an “ethical landscape” (...)
    Direct download (15 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  19
    Should We Continue Treatment for M? The Benefits of Living.T. K. Chan & G. L. Tipoe - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (2):131-133.
    Wilkinson and Savulescu did not agree with the court's decision to continue M's treatment and suggested in their recent commentary that the magnitude of benefits of being alive for M is small compared with the potential use of health resources for other patients. We argue that the benefits of being sensate to the surroundings for an otherwise unconscious person are not necessarily small. One cannot assess on behalf of another person the magnitude of benefits of being alive according to the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  16
    'In a Twilight World'? Judging the Value of Life for the Minimally Conscious Patient.R. Huxtable - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (9):565-569.
    The recent ruling from England on the case of M is one of very few worldwide to consider whether life-sustaining treatment, in the form of clinically assisted nutrition and hydration, should continue to be provided to a patient in a minimally conscious state. Formally concerned with the English law pertaining to precedent autonomy (specifically advance decision-making) and the best interests of the incapacitated patient, the judgment issued in M's case implicitly engages with three different accounts of the value of human (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6.  42
    Withdrawal of Treatment From Minimally Conscious Patients.R. Heywood - 2012 - Clinical Ethics 7 (1):10-16.
    This article explores the taxing legal questions that are raised in the context of withdrawing life sustaining treatment from patients who are in a minimally conscious state. The Court of Protection, for the first time in England, was recently asked to rule on this issue. This paper analyses the legal and ethical implications of this decision moving forward.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations