Citations of work:

Immanuel Kant (2007). Anthropology From a Pragmatic Point of View (1798).

14 found
Order:
Are we missing citations?

PhilPapers citations & references are currently in beta testing. We expect to add many more in the future.

Meanwhile, you can use our bibliography tool to import references for this or another work.

Or you can directly add citations for the above work:

Search for work by author name and title
Add directly by record ID

  1. Kant and Women.Helga Varden - 2017 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 98 (4):653-694.
    Kant's conception of women is complex. Although he struggles to bring his considered view of women into focus, a sympathetic reading shows it not to be anti-feminist and to contain important arguments regarding human nature. Kant believes the traditional male-female distinction is unlikely to disappear, but he never proposes the traditional gender ideal as the moral ideal; he rejects the idea that such considerations of philosophical anthropology can set the framework for morality. This is also why his moral works clarifies (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2. Does Bodily Awareness Interfere with Highly Skilled Movement?Barbara Montero - 2010 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 53 (2):105 – 122.
    It is widely thought that focusing on highly skilled movements while performing them hinders their execution. Once you have developed the ability to tee off in golf, play an arpeggio on the piano, or perform a pirouette in ballet, attention to what your body is doing is thought to lead to inaccuracies, blunders, and sometimes even utter paralysis. Here I re-examine this view and argue that it lacks support when taken as a general thesis. Although bodily awareness may often interfere (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   32 citations  
  3.  48
    On the Division Between Reason and Unreason in Kant.Motohide Saji - 2009 - Human Studies 32 (2):201-223.
    This article examines Kant’s discussion of the division between reason and unreason in his Anthropology from a Pragmatic Point of View . On the one hand, Kant says that there is a normative, clear, and definite division between reason and unreason. On the other hand, Kant offers three arguments showing that we cannot draw such a division. First, we cannot explain the normative grounds for the division. Second, both reason and unreason are present in everyone to varying degrees in different (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Kant’s Answer to the Question ‘What is Man?’ and its Implications for Anthropology.Alix A. Cohen - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (4):506-514.
    This paper examines Kant’s anthropological project and its relationship to his conception of ‘man’ in order to show that Kant’s answer to the question ‘what is man?’ entails a decisive re-evaluation of traditional conceptions of human nature. I argue that Kant redirects the question ‘what is man?’ away from defining man in terms of what he is, and towards defining him in terms of what he does, in particular through the distinction between three levels of what I will call ‘man’s (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  54
    Kant’s Transcendental and Empirical Psychology of Cognition.Claudia M. Schmidt - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (4):462-472.
    One of the perennially intriguing questions regarding Kant’s approach to the human sciences is the relation between his ‘transcendental psychology’ and empirical cognitive psychology. In this paper I compare his analysis of the a priori conditions of human cognition in the Critique of pure reason with his empirical account of the human cognitive faculties in his Anthropology from a pragmatic point of view. In comparing his approach to self-consciousness, sensibility, imagination, and understanding in these two works, I argue that Kant (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6.  58
    Marriage, Morality, and Institutional Value.Elizabeth Brake - 2007 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (3):243-254.
    This paper develops a Kantian account of the moral assessment of institutions. The problem I address is this: while a deontological theory may find that some legal institutions are required by justice, it is not obvious how such a theory can assess institutions not strictly required (or prohibited) by justice. As a starting-point, I consider intuitions that in some cases it is desirable to attribute non-consequentialist moral value to institutions not required by justice. I will argue that neither consequentialist nor (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7.  34
    Kant on Epigenesis, Monogenesis and Human Nature: The Biological Premises of Anthropology.Alix A. Cohen - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 37 (4):675-693.
    The aim of this paper is to show that for Kant, a combination of epigenesis and monogenesis is the condition of possibility of anthropology as he conceives of it and that moreover, this has crucial implications for the biological dimension of his account of human nature. More precisely, I begin by arguing that Kant’s conception of mankind as a natural species is based on two premises: firstly the biological unity of the human species (monogenesis of the human races); and secondly (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8.  34
    Love, That Indispensable Supplement: Irigaray and Kant on Love and Respect.Marguerite la Caze - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (3):92-114.
    Is love essential to ethical life, or merely a supplement? In Kant's view, respect and love, as duties, are in tension with each other because love involves drawing closer and respect involves drawing away. By contrast, Irigaray says that love and respect do not conflict because love as passion must also involve distancing and we have a responsibility to love. I argue that love, understood as passion and based on respect, is essential to ethics.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  75
    From Nature to Culture? Diogenes and Philosophical Anthropology.Christian Lotz - 2005 - Human Studies 28 (1):41-56.
    This essay is concerned with the central issue of philosophical anthropology: the relation between nature and culture. Although Rousseau was the first thinker to introduce this topic within the modern discourse of philosophy and the cultural sciences, it has its origin in Diogenes the Cynic, who was a disciple of Socrates. In my essay I (1) historically introduce a few aspects of philosophical anthropology, (2) deal with the nature–culture exchange, as introduced in Kant, then I (3) relate this topic to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10.  2
    Why Kant and Ecofeminism Don't Mix.Jeanna Moyer - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (3):79-97.
    This paper consists of two sections. In section one, I explore Val Plumwood's description of the features of normative dualism, and briefly discuss how these features are manifest in Immanuel Kant's view of nature. In section two, I evaluate the claims of Holly L. Wilson, who argues that Kant is not a normative dualist. Against Wilson, I will argue that Kant maintains normative dualisms between humans/nature, humans/animals, humans/culture, and men/women. As such, Kant's philosophy is antithetical to the aims of ecofeminism, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11.  1
    The Smell of Nature: Olfaction, Knowledge and the Environment.Daniel Press & Steven C. Minta - 2000 - Philosophy and Geography 3 (2):173-186.
    Olfaction offers unique entry into the non-human world, but Western culture constrains such opportunities because of the dominance of the visual mode of perception. We begin by briefly reviewing philosophical arguments against olfaction as a reliable cognitive input. We then build a biological case for the similarity of non-human and human olfaction. Subsequently, we argue that some contemporary societies still make use of olfaction for organizing themselves in space and time. We end by suggesting that olfaction offers promise for advancing (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  5
    Taking Her Hand: Becoming, Time and the Cultural Politics of the White Wedding.Vikki Bell - 1998 - Cultural Values 2 (4):463-484.
  13.  11
    Kant's Theory of Musical Sound: An Early Exercise in Cognitive Science.Robert E. Butts - 1993 - Dialogue 32 (1):3-.
  14.  6
    The Meaning of “Inhibition” and the Discourse of Order.Roger Smith - 1992 - Science in Context 5 (2).