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Andrew Kania (2005). Against the Ubiquity of Fictional Narrators.

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  1.  16
    Le Grand Imagier of George Wilson Seeing Fictions in Film: The Epistemology of Movies, by George M. Wilson. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011, 240 Pp. ISBN 978‐0‐19‐959489‐4 Hb £30.00. [REVIEW]Robert Pippin - 2013 - European Journal of Philosophy 21 (2):334-341.
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  2.  76
    Imagining and Fiction: Some Issues.Kathleen Stock - 2013 - Philosophy Compass 8 (10):887-896.
    In this paper, I survey in some depth three issues arising from the connection between imagination and fiction: (i) whether fiction can be defined as such in terms of its prescribing imagining; (ii) whether imagining in response to fiction is de se, or de re, or both; (iii) the phenomenon of ‘imaginative resistance’ and various explanations for it. Along the way I survey, more briefly, several other prominent issues in this area too.
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  3. That’s the Fictional Truth, Ruth.Peter Alward - 2010 - Acta Analytica 25 (3):347-363.
    Fictional truth is commonly analyzed in terms of the speech acts or propositional attitudes of a teller. In this paper, I investigate Lewis’s counterfactual analysis in terms of felicitous narrator assertion, Currie’s analysis in terms of fictional author belief, and Byrne’s analysis in terms of ideal author invitations to make-believe—and find them all lacking. I propose instead an analysis in terms of the revelations of an infelicitous narrator.
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  4.  52
    Eluding Wilson's “Elusive Narrators”.David Davies - 2010 - Philosophical Studies 147 (3):387 - 394.
    George Wilson has defended the thesis that even impersonal third-person fictional narratives should be taken to contain fictional narrations and have fictional narrators. This, he argues, is necessary if we are to explain how readers can take themselves, in their imaginative engagement with fictions, to have knowledge of the things they are imagining. I argue that there is at least one class of impersonal third-person fictional narratives—thought experiments—to which Wilson’s model fails to apply, and that this reveals more general problems (...)
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    Eluding Wilson’s “Elusive Narrators”.David Davies - 2010 - Philosophical Studies 147 (3):387-394.
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    Cinematic Narrators.Katherine Thomson-Jones - 2009 - Philosophy Compass 4 (2):296-311.
    This article surveys the current debate among analytic philosophers and film narratologists about the logic and phenomenology of cinematic narration. Particular attention is given to the question of whether every film that represents a fictional narrative also represents a narrator's fictional narration.
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  7.  44
    Need There Be Implicit Narrators of Literary Fictions?Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 135 (1):89 - 94.
  8.  62
    Elusive Narrators in Literature and Film.George M. Wilson - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 135 (1):73 - 88.
    It is widely held in theories of narrative that all works of literary narrative fiction include a narrator who fictionally tells the story. However, it is also granted that the personal qualities of a narrator may be more or less radically effaced. Recently, philosophers and film theorists have debated whether movies similarly involve implicit audio-visual narrators. Those who answer affirmatively allow that these cinematic narrators will be radically effaced. Their opponents deny that audio-visual narrators figure in the ontology of movies (...)
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