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Opus Postumum

Cambridge University Press (1993)

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  1. Editorial Introduction.Damian Veal - 2005 - Angelaki 10 (1):1 – 31.
  • Gottlob Frege, One More Time.Claude Imbert - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (4):156-173.
    Frege's philosophical writings, including the "logistic project," acquire a new insight by being confronted with Kant's criticism and Wittgenstein's logical and grammatical investigations. Between these two points a non-formalist history of logic is just taking shape, a history emphasizing the Greek and Kantian inheritance and its aftermath. It allows us to understand the radical change in rationality introduced by Gottlob Frege's syntax. This syntax put an end to Greek categorization and opened the way to the multiplicity of expressions producing their (...)
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  • Kant’s Emergence and Sellarsian Cognitive Science.Richard McDonough - 2014 - Open Journal of Philosophy 4 (1):44-53.
  • Solipsism and Subjectivity.David Bell - 1996 - European Journal of Philosophy 4 (2):155-174.
  • Philosophy and the Sciences After Kant.Michela Massimi - 2009 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 65:275-311.
    On 11 th October 2007, at the first international conference on Integrated History and Philosophy of Science hosted by the Center for Philosophy of Science in Pittsburgh, Ernan McMullin portrayed a rather gloomy scenario concerning the current relationship between history and philosophy of science, on the one hand, and mainstream philosophy, on the other hand, as testified by a significant drop in the presence of HPS papers at various meetings of the American Philosophical Association.
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  • Kant-Bibliographie 2000.Margit Ruffing - 2002 - Kant-Studien 93 (4):491-536.
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  • Does Kant's Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science Fill a Gap in the Critique of Pure Reason?Kenneth R. Westphal - 1995 - Synthese 103 (1):43 - 86.
    In 1792 and 1798 Kant noticed two basic problems with hisMetaphysical Foundations of Natural Science (MAdN) which opened a crucial gap in the Critical system as a whole. Why is theMAdN so important? I show that the Analogies of Experience form an integrated proof of transeunt causality. This is central to Kant's answer to Hume. This proof requires explicating the empirical concept of matter as the moveable in space, it requires the specifically metaphysical principle that every physical event has an (...)
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  • Moral Obligation After the Death of God: Critical Reflections on Concerns From Immanuel Kant, G.W.F. Hegel, and Elizabeth Anscombe. [REVIEW]H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr - 2010 - In Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred Dycus Miller & Jeffrey Paul (eds.), Social Philosophy and Policy. Cambridge University Press. pp. 317-340.
    Once God is no longer recognized as the ground and the enforcer of morality, the character and force of morality undergoes a significant change, a point made by G.E.M. Anscombe in her observation that without God the significance of morality is changed, as the word criminal would be changed if there were no criminal law and criminal courts. There is no longer in principle a God's-eye perspective from which one can envisage setting moral pluralism aside. In addition, it becomes impossible (...)
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  • The Impossibility of Moral Responsibility.Galen J. Strawson - 1994 - Philosophical Studies 75 (1-2):5-24.
  • Medicine, Morality, and Mortality: The Challenges of Moral Diversity.Mark J. Cherry - 2015 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (5):473-483.
    This issue of The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy assesses the deep and abiding tensions that exist among the competing epistemic perspectives that bear on medicine and morality. Concepts of health and disease, as well as the theoretical framing of medical ethics and health care policy, intersect with an overlapping set of culturally situated communities, striving to understand and manipulate the world in ways that each finds explanatory, appropriate, or otherwise befitting. The articles explore the complexities of framing public health (...)
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  • Inner Sense, Body Sense, and Kant's "Refutation of Idealism".Quassim Cassam - 1993 - European Journal of Philosophy 1 (2):111-127.
  • Mises, the A Priori, and the Foundations of Economics: A Qualified Defence.Stephen D. Parsons - 1997 - Economics and Philosophy 13 (2):175-196.
    In a recent paper, Pierluigi Barrotta argues that Mises ‘ended up by defending an epistemological tenet very far from Kant's’ , concluding that ‘Mises's apriorism cannot be vindicated through Kant's epistemology’ . In contrast, I shall argue that certain of Mises's arguments can be reconstructed in Kantian terms, and thus the distance between Mises and Kant is not as extreme as Barrotta's argument may appear to suggest. Specifically, I shall argue that Mises, like Kant, seeks to establish the a priori (...)
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  • Why Reflective Equilibrium? II: Following Up on Rawls's Comparison of His Own Approach with a Kantian Approach.Svein Eng - 2014 - Ratio Juris 27 (2):288-310.
    In A Theory of Justice (1971), John Rawls introduces the concept of “reflective equilibrium.” Although there are innumerable references to and discussions of this concept in the literature, there is, to the present author's knowledge, no discussion of the most important question: Why reflective equilibrium? In particular, the question arises: Is the method of reflective equilibrium applicable to the choice of this method itself? Rawls's drawing of parallels between Kant's moral theory and his own suggests that his concept of “reflective (...)
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  • Gottlob Frege, One More Time.Claude Imbert & tr Bontea, Adriana - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (4):156-173.
    : Frege's philosophical writings, including the "logistic project," acquire a new insight by being confronted with Kant's criticism and Wittgenstein's logical and grammatical investigations. Between these two points a non-formalist history of logic is just taking shape, a history emphasizing the Greek and Kantian inheritance and its aftermath. It allows us to understand the radical change in rationality introduced by Gottlob Frege's syntax. This syntax put an end to Greek categorization and opened the way to the multiplicity of expressions producing (...)
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