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  1. Scientific Modeling Versus Engineering Modeling: Similarities and Dissimilarities.Aboutorab Yaghmaie - 2021 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 52 (3):455-474.
    This article aims to answer what I call the “constitution question of engineering modeling”: in virtue of what does an engineering model model its target system? To do so, I will offer a category-theoretic, structuralist account of design, using the olog framework. Drawing on this account, I will conclude that engineering and scientific models are not only cognitively but also representationally indistinguishable. I will finally propose an axiological criterion for distinguishing scientific from engineering modeling.
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  • A New Framework for Teaching Scientific Reasoning to Students From Application-Oriented Sciences.Wybo Houkes & Krist Vaesen - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 11 (2):1-16.
    About three decades ago, the late Ronald Giere introduced a new framework for teaching scientific reasoning to science students. Giere’s framework presents a model-based alternative to the traditional statement approach—in which scientific inferences are reconstructed as explicit arguments, composed of premises and a conclusion. Subsequent research in science education has shown that model-based approaches are particularly effective in teaching science students how to understand and evaluate scientific reasoning. One limitation of Giere’s framework, however, is that it covers only one type (...)
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  • Practical Epistemic Cognition in a Design Project - Engineering Students Developing Epistemic Fluency.Jonte Bernhard, Anna-Karin Carstensen, Jacob Davidsen & Thomas Ryberg - 2019 - IEEE Transactions on Education 62 (3):216-225.
    Contribution: This paper reports engineering students' practical epistemic cognition by studying their interactional work in situ. Studying "epistemologies in action'' the study breaks away from mainstream approaches that describe this in terms of beliefs or of stage theories. Background: In epistemology, knowledge is traditionally seen as "justified true belief'', neglecting knowledge related to action. Interest has increased in studying the epistemologies people use in situated action, and their development of epistemic fluency. How appropriate such approaches are in engineering and design (...)
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