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  1. Contextual and Individual Dimensions of Taxpayer Decision Making.Jeffrey Cohen, Gil B. Manzon & Valentina L. Zamora - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (4):1-17.
    We examine whether a taxpayer’s decision to choose a taxpayer-favorable (vs. a taxpayer-unfavorable) characterization of income is associated with contextual and individual dimensions of that decision. Using a 2 × 2 factorial experimental design, we manipulate the prevailing social norm on whether there is a general belief that a specific form of income should be characterized as a capital gain (taxed at a lower tax rate and hence taxpayer favorable) or as ordinary income (taxed at a higher tax rate and (...)
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  • Discussant Comment on An Examination of the Effect of CEO Social Ties and CEO Reputation on Nonprofessional Investors’ Say-on-Pay Judgments, by Steve Kaplan, Janet Samuels, Jeffrey Cohen.Regan N. Schmidt - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (1):119-123.
  • Do Compensation Committee Members Perceive Changing CEO Incentive Performance Targets Mid-Cycle to Be Fair?Anne M. Wilkins, Dana R. Hermanson & Jeffrey R. Cohen - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 137 (3):623-638.
    We examine the influences of social capital, source credibility, and fairness perceptions on the judgments of experienced compensation committee members who are considering a proposal to reduce management’s performance targets in the middle of a compensation cycle due to difficult circumstances. Eighty-nine U.S. public company CC members participated in a 2 × 2 experiment with social capital and source credibility each manipulated as low or high, and outcome fairness to management, process fairness to shareholders, and outcome fairness to shareholders included (...)
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  • The Effects of Current Income Attributes on Nonprofessional Investors’ Say-on-Pay Judgments: Does Fairness Still Matter?Steven E. Kaplan & Valentina L. Zamora - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 153 (2):407-425.
    The say-on-pay regulation in the Dodd-Frank Act requires publicly-traded U.S. firms to hold a nonbinding, advisory shareholder vote on executive compensation. Advocates claim that SOP voting gives shareholders a mechanism to hold managers and boards more accountable. Critics contend that SOP votes may simplistically reflect shareholders’ reactions to the overall value of CEO compensation or the firm’s net income. However, based on prior research, we contend that market participants’ SOP votes are likely to consider current income attributes. For example, the (...)
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