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  1. Does the Ethical Culture of Organisations Promote Managers' Occupational Well-Being? Investigating Indirect Links Via Ethical Strain.Mari Huhtala, Taru Feldt, Anna-Maija Lämsä, Saija Mauno & Ulla Kinnunen - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (2):231-247.
    The present study had two major aims: first, to examine the construct validity of the Finnish 58-item Corporate Ethical Virtues scale (CEV; Kaptein in J Org Behav 29:923–947, 2008) and second, to examine whether the associations between managers’ perceptions of ethical organisational culture and their occupational well-being (emotional exhaustion and work engagement) are indirectly linked by ethical strain, i.e. the tension which arises from the difference in the ethical values of the individual and the organisation he or she works for. (...)
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  • Ethics Management in Public Relations: Practitioner Conceptualizations of Ethical Leadership, Knowledge, Training and Compliance.Seow Ting Lee & I.-Huei Cheng - 2012 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 27 (2):80 - 96.
    Little is known and understood about ethics management or the development of formal, systematic, and goal-directed initiatives to improve ethics in the public relations workplace. This study found little ethics training and written guidelines in the public relations workplace. Organizational ethics initiatives are poorly communicated to practitioners and rely mostly on punitive restraints with little reward for ethical behavior. For many practitioners, ethics is not learned through workplace ethics initiatives but rather is mostly informed by external influences including personal values, (...)
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  • The Relationship Between Ethical Organisational Culture and Organisational Innovativeness: Comparison of Findings From Finland and Lithuania.Raminta Pučėtaitė, Aurelija Novelskaitė, Anna-Maija Lämsä & Elina Riivari - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 139 (4):685-700.
    The paper explores the interrelations between ethical organisational culture and organisational innovativeness in two different socio-cultural contexts, Finland and Lithuania. According to the Global Innovation Index 2013, Finland ranked 6th and Lithuania 40th in terms of the national capacity to produce innovations. Prior research by Riivari and Lämsä and Riivari et al. argues the importance of the ethical dimension of organisational culture in fostering the organisational capacity to innovate. In this paper, a different context is taken to test hypothesised differences (...)
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  • Is Formal Ethics Training Merely Cosmetic? A Study of Ethics Training and Ethical Organizational Culture.Danielle E. Warren, Joseph P. Gaspar & William S. Laufer - 2014 - Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (1):85-117.
    U.S. Organizational Sentencing Guidelines provide firms with incentives to develop formal ethics programs to promote ethical organizational cultures and thereby decrease corporate offenses. Yet critics argue such programs are cosmetic. Here we studied bank employees before and after the introduction of formal ethics training—an important component of formal ethics programs—to examine the effects of training on ethical organizational culture. Two years after a single training session, we find sustained, positive effects on indicators of an ethical organizational culture . While espoused (...)
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  • When Does a Proactive Personality Enhance an Employee’s Whistle-Blowing Intention?: A Cross-Level Investigation of the Employees in Chinese Companies.Yan Liu, Shuming Zhao, Li Jiang & Rui Li - 2016 - Ethics and Behavior 26 (8):660-677.
    To identify the boundary conditions for proactive employees making whistle-blowing decisions, we developed a cross-level model comprising employee proactive personality and two types of whistle-blowing intentions that incorporates the influences of organizational- and individual-level attributes. Analyses of data collected from 432 Chinese employees in 32 companies indicated that proactive personality was positively related to internal whistle-blowing intention and even more positively related to external whistle-blowing intention when individuals were working in organizations characterized by an instrumental ethical climate and employees with (...)
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  • Painting with the Same Brush? Surveying Unethical Behavior in the Workplace Using Self-Reports and Observer-Reports.Franziska Zuber & Muel Kaptein - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 125 (3):1-32.
    Research by academics, professional organizations, and businesses on ethics in the workplace often relies on surveys that ask employees to report how frequently they have observed others engaging in unethical behavior. But what do these frequencies in observer-reports say about the frequencies of committed unethical behavior? This paper is the first to address this question by empirically exploring the relationship between observer- and self-reports. Our survey research among the Swiss working population shows that for all 37 different forms of unethical (...)
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  • Does It Pay to Be Ethical? Examining the Relationship Between Organisations' Ethical Culture and Innovativeness.Elina Riivari & Anna-Maija Lämsä - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 124 (1):1-17.
    In this article, we examine the relationship between ethical organisational culture and organisational innovativeness. A quantitative empirical analysis is based on a survey of a total of 719 respondents from all levels of three Finnish organisations, both general staff and managers. The organisations belong to both the private and public sectors. The results of this study show that organisations’ ethical culture is associated with their organisational innovativeness, and that different dimensions of ethical culture are associated with different dimensions of organisational (...)
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  • Organizational Ethical Virtues of Innovativeness.Elina Riivari & Anna-Maija Lämsä - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 155 (1):223-240.
    This study participates in the discussion of the ethical culture of organizations by deepening the knowledge and understanding of the meaning of organizational ethical virtues in organizational innovativeness. The aim in this study was to explore how an organization’s ethical culture and, more specifically, organization’s ethical virtues support organizational innovativeness. The ethical culture of an organization is defined as the virtuousness of an organization. Organizational innovativeness is conceptualized as an organization’s behavioral propensity to produce innovative products and services. The empirical (...)
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  • Moral Agents in Organisations? The Significance of Ethical Organisation Culture for Middle Managers’ Exercise of Moral Agency in Ethical Problems.Minna-Maaria Hiekkataipale & Anna-Maija Lämsä - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 155 (1):147-161.
    This paper investigates qualitatively the significance of different dimensions of ethical organisation culture for the exercise of middle managers’ moral agency in ethical problems. The research draws on the social cognitive theory of morality and on the corporate ethical virtues model. This study broadens understanding of the factors which enable or constrain managers’ potential for moral agency in organisations, and shows that an insufficient ethical organisational culture may contribute to indifference towards ethical issues, the experiencing of moral conflicts, lack of (...)
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  • Influence of Formal Ethics Program Components on Managerial Ethical Behavior.Anna Remišová, Anna Lašáková & Zuzana Kirchmayer - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-16.
    The article deals with the influence of organizational ethics program components on managerial ethical behavior. The main aim was to establish which EP components are perceived as valuable and useful to foster the ethical behavior of managers. Moreover, we also aimed to investigate the role of ethics training in this context and to explore whether it can potentially increase managers’ trust in EP components as effective tools for the promotion of ethical behavior. The article advances the EP theory in several (...)
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  • Ethical Organisational Culture as a Context for Managers' Personal Work Goals.Mari Huhtala, Taru Feldt, Katriina Hyvönen & Saija Mauno - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 114 (2):265-282.
    The aims of this study were to investigate what kinds of personal work goals managers have and whether ethical organisational culture is related to these goals. The sample consisted of 811 Finnish managers from different organisations, in middle and upper management levels, aged 25–68 years. Eight work-related goal content categories were found based on the managers self-reported goals: (1) organisational goals (35.4 %), (2) competence goals (26.1 %), (3) well-being goals (12.1 %), (4) career-ending goals (7.3 %), (5) progression goals (...)
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  • The Corporate Ethical Virtues Scale: Factorial Invariance Across Organizational Samples.Maiju Kangas, Taru Feldt, Mari Huhtala & Johanna Rantanen - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 124 (1):161-171.
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  • The Relationship Between Informal Controls, Ethical Work Climates, and Organizational Performance.Sebastian Goebel & Barbara E. Weißenberger - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 141 (3):505-528.
    Due to the frequent occurrence of ethical transgressions and unethical employee behaviors, there has lately been an increasing interest in the ethical foundations of contemporary organizations. However, large-scale comprehensive analyses of organizational ethics are still comparatively limited. Our study contributes to both management control and business ethics literature by empirically examining potential antecedents as well as resulting effects of ethical work climates on organizational-level outcomes. Based on a cross-sectional survey among 295 large- and medium-sized companies, we find that more informal (...)
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  • Organizational Ethics Research: A Systematic Review of Methods and Analytical Techniques.Michael S. McLeod, G. Tyge Payne & Robert E. Evert - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 134 (3):429-443.
    Ethics are of interest to business scholars because they influence decisions, behaviors, and outcomes. While scholars have increasingly shown interest in business ethics as a research topic, there are a mounting number of studies that examine ethical issues at the organizational level of analysis. This manuscript reports the results of a systematic review of empirical research on organizational ethics published in a broad sample of business journals over a 33-year period. A total of 184 articles are analyzed to reveal gaps (...)
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  • Taking Credit.William J. Graham & William H. Cooper - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 115 (2):403-425.
    Taking credit is the process through which organizational members claim responsibility for work activities. We begin by describing a publically disputed case of credit taking and then draw on psychological, situational, and personality constructs to provide a model that may explain when and why organizational members are likely to take credit. We identify testable propositions about the credit-taking process, discuss ethical aspects of credit taking and suggest areas for research on credit taking in organizations.
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  • Ethical Climate and Purchasing Social Responsibility: A Benevolence Focus. [REVIEW]Constantin Blome & Antony Paulraj - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 116 (3):567-585.
    Using a sample of multinational firms in Germany, we develop and empirically examine a model to test the effects of ethical climate and its antecedents on purchasing social responsibility (PSR). Our results show different effects of benevolence dimensions of ethical climate on PSR: employee-focused climate has no effect, but community-focused climate is a significant driver of PSR. The results also show that top management ethical norms and code of conduct implementation impact PSR directly as well as indirectly through ethical climate.
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  • The Anatomy of Corporate Fraud: A Comparative Analysis of High Profile American and European Corporate Scandals.Bahram Soltani - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 120 (2):251-274.
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  • When Organizations Are Too Good: Applying Aristotle's Doctrine of the Mean to the Corporate Ethical Virtues Model.Muel Kaptein - 2017 - Business Ethics: A European Review 26 (3):300-311.
    Aristotle's doctrine of the mean states that a virtue is the mean state between two vices: a deficient and an excessive one. The Corporate Ethical Virtues Model defines the mean and the corresponding deficient vice for each of its seven virtues. This paper defines for each of these virtues the corresponding excessive vice and explores why organizations characterized by these excessive vices increase the likelihood that their employees will behave unethically. The excessive vices are patronization, pompousness, lavishness, zealotry, overexposure, talkativeness, (...)
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