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Language and Other Abstract Objects

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers (1980)

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  1. Impossible Worlds and Partial Belief.Edward Elliott - 2019 - Synthese 196 (8):3433-3458.
    One response to the problem of logical omniscience in standard possible worlds models of belief is to extend the space of worlds so as to include impossible worlds. It is natural to think that essentially the same strategy can be applied to probabilistic models of partial belief, for which parallel problems also arise. In this paper, I note a difficulty with the inclusion of impossible worlds into probabilistic models. Under weak assumptions about the space of worlds, most of the propositions (...)
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  • Linguistic Intuitions.Jeffrey Maynes & Steven Gross - 2013 - Philosophy Compass 8 (8):714-730.
    Linguists often advert to what are sometimes called linguistic intuitions. These intuitions and the uses to which they are put give rise to a variety of philosophically interesting questions: What are linguistic intuitions – for example, what kind of attitude or mental state is involved? Why do they have evidential force and how might this force be underwritten by their causal etiology? What light might their causal etiology shed on questions of cognitive architecture – for example, as a case study (...)
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  • Logical Form and the Vernacular.Reinaldo Elugardo & Robert J. Stainton - 2001 - Mind and Language 16 (4):393–424.
    Vernacularism is the view that logical forms are fundamentally assigned to natural language expressions, and are only derivatively assigned to anything else, e.g., propositions, mental representations, expressions of symbolic logic, etc. In this paper, we argue that Vernacularism is not as plausible as it first appears because of non-sentential speech. More specifically, there are argument-premises, meant by speakers of non-sentences, for which no natural language paraphrase is readily available in the language used by the speaker and the hearer. The speaker (...)
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  • Advertisement for a Semantics for Psychology.Ned Block - 1986 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 10 (1):615-678.
  • Transcending Inductive Category Formation in Learning.Roger C. Schank, Gregg C. Collins & Lawrence E. Hunter - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):639-651.
  • Saving the Doxastic Account of Intuitions.Christian Nimtz - 2010 - Philosophical Psychology 23 (3):357-375.
    Many philosophers and psychologists hold that intuitions are, or reduce to, beliefs. The argument from intuition without beliefs threatens to undercut any such doxastic account: since there are clear cases of intuition without belief, intuitions cannot be beliefs. Advocates of the intellectual seeming account conclude that intuitions belong to the basic mental kind of intellectual seeming. I argue that rightly understood, apparent cases of intuition without belief are cases of someone having the inclination to believe that p whilst believing that (...)
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  • Relevant Features and Statistical Models of Generalization.James E. Corter - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):653-654.
  • Induction: Weak but Essential.Thomas G. Dietterich - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):654-655.
  • Toward a Cognitive Science of Category Learning.Robert L. Campbell & Wendy A. Kellogg - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):652-653.
  • Are There Static Category Representations in Long-Term Memory?Lawrence W. Barsalou - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):651-652.
  • Category Learning: Things Aren't so Black and White.John R. Anderson - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):651-651.
  • The Learning of Function and the Function of Learning.Roger C. Schank, Gregg C. Collins & Lawrence E. Hunter - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):672-686.
  • Are There Really Two Types of Learning?Yorick Wilks - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):671-671.
  • The Hard Questions About Noninductive Learning Remain Unanswered.Eric Wanner - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):670-670.
  • Rejecting Induction: Using Occam's Razor Too Soon.J. T. Tolliver - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):669-670.
  • The Pragmatics of Induction.Paul Thagard - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):668-669.
  • Category Differences/Automaticity.Edward E. Smith - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):667-667.
  • Salvaging Parts of the “Classical Theory” of Categorization.Dan Sperber - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):668-668.
  • Theory-Laden Concepts: Great, but What is the Next Step?Charles P. Shimp - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):666-667.
  • Approaches, Assumptions, and Goals in Modeling Cognitive Behavior.Richard E. Pastore & David G. Payne - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):665-666.
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  • The Psychology of Category Learning: Current Status and Future Prospect.Gregory L. Murphy - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):664-665.
  • Of What Use Categories?Ruth Garrett Millikan - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):663-664.
  • Induction and Explanation: Complementary Models of Learning.Pat Langley - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):661-662.
  • When Explanation is Too Hard.Michael Lebowitz - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):662-663.
  • New Failures to Learn.Barbara Landau - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):660-661.
  • Induction and Probability.Henry E. Kyburg - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):660-660.
  • Second-Generation AI Theories of Learning.David Kirsh - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):658-659.
  • Clarity, Generality, and Efficiency in Models of Learning: Wringing the MOP.Kevin T. Kelly - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):657-658.
  • Transcending “Transcending…”.Stephen Jośe Hanson - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):656-657.
  • Complementing Explanation with Induction.Clark Glymour - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):655-656.
  • Absolute Spirit and Universal Self-Consciousness: Bruno Bauer's Revolutionary Subjectivism.Douglas Moggach - 1989 - Dialogue 28 (2):235-.
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  • Le rationalisme et l'analyse linguistique.Sylvain Auroux - 1989 - Dialogue 28 (2):203-.
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  • Language is an Instrument for Thought. Really?Jan Nuyts - 2012 - Pragmatics and Cognition 20 (2):317-333.
    This discussion article addresses the assumption formulated in Dan Everett's new book Language: The Cultural Tool that language is not only an instrument for communication, but also an instrument for thought. It argues that the latter assumption is far from obvious, and that, in any case, one cannot put communication and thought on a par in discussing the functionality of language.
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  • Realism Vs. Conceptualism in Linguistics.Jerrold J. Katz & Paul M. Postal - 1991 - Linguistics and Philosophy 14 (5):515 - 554.
  • Arguments Over Intuitions?Tomasz Wysocki - 2016 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-23.
    Deutsch 2010 claims that hypothetical scenarios are evaluated using arguments, not intuitions, and therefore experiments on intuitions are philosophically inconsequential. Using the Gettier case as an example, he identifies three arguments that are supposed to point to the right response to the case. In the paper, I present the results of studies ran on Polish, Indian, Spanish, and American participants that suggest that there’s no deep difference between evaluating the Gettier case with intuitions and evaluating it with Deutsch’s arguments. Specifically, (...)
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  • A Scientific Psychologistic Foundation for Theories of Meaning.Lawrence J. Kaye - 1995 - Minds and Machines 5 (2):187-206.
    I propose, develop and defend the view that theories of meaning — for instance, a theory specifying the logical form or truth conditions of natural language sentences — should be naturalized to scientific psychological inquiry. This involves both psychologism — the claim that semantics characterizes psychological states — and scientific naturalism — the claim that semantics will depend on the data and theories of scientific psychology. I argue that scientific psychologism is more plausible than the traditional alternative, the view that (...)
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  • Remarks on the Metaphysics of Linguistics.James Higginbotham - 1991 - Linguistics and Philosophy 14 (5):555 - 566.
  • Abstracting Propositions.Anthony Wrigley - 2006 - Synthese 151 (2):157-176.
    This paper examines the potential for abstracting propositions – an as yet untested way of defending the realist thesis that propositions as abstract entities exist. I motivate why we should want to abstract propositions and make clear, by basing an account on the neo-Fregean programme in arithmetic, what ontological and epistemological advantages a realist can gain from this. I then raise a series of problems for the abstraction that ultimately have serious repercussions for realism about propositions in general. I first (...)
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  • Creating Legal Terms: A Linguistic Perspective. [REVIEW]Pius ten Hacken - 2010 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 23 (4):407-425.
    Legal terms have a special status at the interface between language and law. Adopting the general framework developed by Jackendoff and the concepts competence and performance as developed by Chomsky, it is shown that legal terms cannot be fully accounted for unless we set up a category of abstract objects. This idea corresponds largely to the classical view of terminology, which has been confronted with some challenges recently. It is shown that for legal terms, arguments against abstract objects are not (...)
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  • Katz and Postal on Realism.David J. Israel - 1991 - Linguistics and Philosophy 14 (5):567 - 574.
  • Anthropocentrism and Truth.Timothy Williamson - 1987 - Philosophia 17 (1):33-53.
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  • A Platonist Epistemology.Mark Balaguer - 1995 - Synthese 103 (3):303 - 325.
    A response is given here to Benacerraf's 1973 argument that mathematical platonism is incompatible with a naturalistic epistemology. Unlike almost all previous platonist responses to Benacerraf, the response given here is positive rather than negative; that is, rather than trying to find a problem with Benacerraf's argument, I accept his challenge and meet it head on by constructing an epistemology of abstract (i.e., aspatial and atemporal) mathematical objects. Thus, I show that spatio-temporal creatures like ourselves can attain knowledge about mathematical (...)
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  • The Not so Happy Story of the Marriage of Linguistics and Psychology or Why Linguistics has Discouraged Psychology's Recent Advances.Robert N. McCauley - 1987 - Synthese 72 (3):341 - 353.
  • Bridging Boundaries Versus Breaking Boundaries: Psycholinguistics in Perspective.Adele A. Abrahamsen - 1987 - Synthese 72 (3):355 - 388.
  • Literal Meaning and Psychological Theory.Raymond W. Gibbs - 1984 - Cognitive Science 8 (3):275-304.
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  • Assessing Direct and Indirect Evidence in Linguistic Research.Christina Behme - 2014 - Topoi 33 (2):373-383.
    This paper focuses on the linguistic evidence base provided by proponents of conceptualism (e.g., Chomsky) and rational realism (e.g., Katz) and challenges some of the arguments alleging that the evidence allowed by conceptualists is superior to that of rational realists. Three points support this challenge. First, neither conceptualists nor realists are in a position to offer direct evidence. This challenges the conceptualists’ claim that their evidence is inherently superior. Differences between the kinds of available indirect evidence will be discussed. Second, (...)
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  • Linguistics and Psychology.Scott Soames - 1984 - Linguistics and Philosophy 7 (2):155 - 179.
  • Deranging the Mental Lexicon.Endre Begby - 2016 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 59 (1):33-55.
    This paper offers a defense of Davidson’s conclusion in ‘A Nice Derangement of Epitaphs’, focusing on the psychology and epistemology of language. Drawing on empirical studies in language acquisition and sociolinguistics, I problematize the traditional idealizing assumption that a person’s mental lexicon consists of two distinct parts—a dictionary, comprising her knowledge of word meanings proper, and an encyclopedia, comprising her wider knowledge of worldly affairs. I argue that the breakdown of the dictionary–encyclopedia distinction can be given a cognitive and functional (...)
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  • In Defense of Definitions.David Pitt - 1999 - Philosophical Psychology 12 (2):139-156.
    The arguments of Fodor, Garret, Walker and Parkes [(1980) Against definitions, Cognition, 8, 263-367] are the source of widespread skepticism in cognitive science about lexical semantic structure. Whereas the thesis that lexical items, and the concepts they express, have decompositional structure (i.e. have significant constituents) was at one time "one of those ideas that hardly anybody [in the cognitive sciences] ever considers giving up" (p. 264), most researchers now believe that "[a]ll the evidence suggests that the classical [(decompositional)] view is (...)
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  • The Unfinished Chomskyan Revolution.Jerrold J. Katz - 1996 - Mind and Language 11 (3):270-294.
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