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  1. Ground Zero for a Post-Moral Ethics in J. M. Coetzee’s Disgrace and Julia Kristeva’s Melancholic.Cynthia Willett - 2012 - Continental Philosophy Review 45 (1):1-22.
    Perhaps no other novel has received as much attention from moral philosophers as South African writer J. M. Coetzee’s Disgrace . The novel is ethically compelling and yet no moral theory explains its force. Despite clear Kantian moments, neither rationalism nor self-respect can account for the strange ethical task that the protagonist sets for himself. Calling himself the dog man, like the ancient Cynics, this shamelessly cynical protagonist takes his cues for ethics not from humans but from animals. He does (...)
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  • The Movement From Ethics to Social Relationships for Levinas, and Why Decency Obscures Obligation.Marc A. Cohen - 2016 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 79 (2):89-100.
    According to Emmanuel Levinas, the individual bears an infinite obligation to the other person. In the Talmudic reading “Judaism and revolution,” Levinas suggests that we move from the ethical encounter to social relationships using contracts—both particular contracts and the social contract. So social relationships are created by limiting obligation, and as a result these relationships can only be practically acceptable, not ethical. Jewish religious practice for Levinas should also be understood as a set of negotiated limits to our infinite obligation.
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  • The End of Man.Jean-Paul Martinon - 2013 - Punctum Books.
    Masculinity? This book attempts to answer this one-word question by revisiting key philosophical concepts in the construction of masculinity, not in order to re-write or debunk them again, but in order to provide a radically new departure to what masculinity means today. This new departure focuses on an understanding of sexuality and gender that is neither structured in oppositional terms nor in performative terms, but in a perpendicular relation akin to that which brings space and time together. In doing so, (...)
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  • Levinas and the Philosophy of Religion.Stephen Minister & Jackson Murtha - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (11):1023-1033.
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  • Why is Ethics First Philosophy? Levinas in Phenomenological Context.Steven Crowell - 2012 - European Journal of Philosophy 20 (4):564-588.
    This paper explores, from a phenomenological perspective, the conditions necessary for the possession of intentional content, i.e., for being intentionally directed toward the world. It argues that Levinas's concept of ethics as first philosophy makes an important contribution to this task. Intentional directedness, as understood here, is normatively structured. Levinas's ‘ethics’ can be understood as a phenomenological account of how our experience of the other subject as another subject takes place in the recognition of the normative force of a command. (...)
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  • Mourning and Metonymy: Bearing Witness Between Women and Generations.Sara Murphy - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (4):144-168.
    Drucilla Cornell's Legacies of Dignity: Between Women and Generations proposes a feminist ethics of self-representation that asks what exclusions are necessary to autobiography's constructions of identity. Focusing on the ways in which alterity, particularly linked with figures of the mother, are silenced, it advances a mourning that is transformational. I question Cornell's use of a Kantian concept of dignity and suggest that Irigaray's engagement with Levinas offers another way of conceptualizing the problematic.
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  • Mourning and Metonymy: Bearing Witness Between Women and Generations.Sara Murphy - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (4):142-166.
    Drucilla Cornell's Legacies of Dignity: Between Women and Generations proposes a feminist ethics of self-representation that asks what exclusions are necessary to autobiography's constructions of identity. Focusing on the ways in which alterity, particularly linked with figures of the mother, are silenced, it advances a mourning that is transformational. I question Cornell's use of a Kantian concept of dignity and suggest that Irigaray's engagement with Levinas offers another way of conceptualizing the problematic.
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  • Of Levinas’ ‘Structure’ in Address to His Four ‘Others’.Dino Galetti - 2016 - Continental Philosophy Review 49 (4):509-532.
    It has long been accepted that one of Levinas’ major concerns is to establish an ethics of responsibility for the ‘other.’ Yet it has been deemed for decades, even by Levinasians, that his approach to that concern is ‘unsystematic’ and ‘not consistent.’ That situation arose because Levinas’ four terms for ‘other’ are difficult to translate, so his terms were first addressed by adopting English conventions. Such conventions have furthered Levinas scholarship, but our aim is to consider Levinas’ consistency: Hence we (...)
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  • Review of Denise Egéa-Kuehne, Levinas and Education: At the Intersection of Faith and Reason. [REVIEW]Claire Katz - 2009 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 28 (4):375-381.
  • Mourning and Metonymy: Bearing Witness Between Women and Generations.Sara Murphy - 2004 - Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 19 (4):142-166.
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  • The Skin of the Other.Brian Bergen-Aurand - 2010 - Journal of Information Ethics 19 (2):100-113.