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Nietzsche, Philosopher, Psychologist, Antichrist

Princeton University Press (1950)

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  1. Nietzsche, Illness and the Body’s Quest for Narrative.Peter Richard Sedgwick - 2013 - Health Care Analysis 21 (4):306-322.
    This paper explores Nietzsche’s approach to the question of illness. It develops an account of Nietzsche’s ideas in the wake of Arthur W. Frank’s discussion of the shortcomings of modern medicine and narrative theory. Nietzsche’s approach to illness is then explored in the context of On the Genealogy of Morality and his conception of the human being as “the sick animal”. This account, it is argued, allows for Nietzsche to develop a conception of suffering that refuses to reduce it to (...)
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  • Nietzsche's Positivism.Nadeem J. Z. Hussain - 2004 - European Journal of Philosophy 12 (3):326–368.
    Nietzsche’s favourable comments about science and the senses have recently been taken as evidence of naturalism. Others focus on his falsification thesis: our beliefs are falsifying interpretations of reality. Clark argues that Nietzsche eventually rejects this thesis. This article utilizes the multiple ways of being science friendly in Nietzsche’s context by focussing on Mach’s neutral monism. Mach’s positivism is a natural development of neo-Kantian positions Nietzsche was reacting to. Section 15 of Beyond Good and Evil is crucial to Clark’s interpretation. (...)
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  • Postmodernism's Self-Nullifying Reading of Nietzsche.Thomas Jovanovski - 2001 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 44 (4):405 – 432.
    To the extent they have adopted a cafeteria-style approach to Nietzsche's trademark conceptions, kneading and molding his words into chimerical constructs, postmodernist philosophers inevitably remind us of Zarathustra's description of 'scholars': 'They work like mills and like stamps: throw down your seed-corn to them and they will know how to grind it small and reduce it to white dust' ( TSZ , II, 16). If so, how much significance might we attribute to any postmodernist's 'findings' of any textual nuances in (...)
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  • Nietzsche Contra Darwin.John Richardson - 2002 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (3):537-575.
    Nietzsche attributes 'will power' to all living things, but this seems in sharp conflict with other positions important to him-and implausible besides. The doctrine smacks of both metaphysics and anthropomorphizing, which he elsewhere derides. Will to power seems to be an intentional end-directedness, involving cognitive or representational powers he is rightly loath to attribute to all organisms, and tends to downplay even in persons. This paper argues that we find a stronger reading of will to power-both more plausible and more (...)
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  • Noble Markets: The Noble/Slave Ethic in Hayek’s Free Market Capitalism. [REVIEW]Edward J. Romar - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (1):57 - 66.
    Friedrich A. von Hayek influenced many areas of inquiry including economics, psychology and political theory. This article will offer one possible interpretation of the ethical foundation of Hayek’s political and social contributions to libertarianism and free market capitalism by analyzing several of his important non-economic publications, primarily The Road to Serfdom, The Fatal Conceit, The Constitution of Liberty and Law, Legislation and Liberty. While Hayek did not offer a particular ethical foundation for free market capitalism, he argued consistently that free (...)
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  • “Clever Beasts Who Invented Knowing”: Nietzsche's Evolutionary Biology of Knowledge. [REVIEW]C. U. M. Smith - 1987 - Biology and Philosophy 2 (1):65-91.
    Nietzsche was a philosopher, not a biologist, Nevertheless his philosophical thought was deeply influenced by ideas emerging from the evolutionary biology of the nineteenth century. His relationship to the Darwinism of his time is difficult to disentangle. It is argued that he was in a sense an unwitting Darwinist. It follows that his philosophical thought is of considerable interest to those concerned to develop an evolutionary biology of mankind. His approach can be likened to that of an extraterrestrial sociobiologist studying (...)
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  • Going to School with Friedrich Nietzsche: The Self in Service of Noble Culture.Douglas W. Yacek - 2014 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (4):391-411.
    To understand Nietzsche’s pedagogy of self-overcoming and to determine its true import for contemporary education, it is necessary to understand Nietzsche’s view of the self that is to be overcome. Nevertheless, previous interpretations of self-overcoming in the journals of the philosophy of education have lacked serious engagement with the Nietzschean self. I devote the first part of this paper to redressing this neglect and arguing for a view of the Nietzschean self as an assemblage of ontologically basic affects which have (...)
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  • Nietzsche Contra “Self-Reformulation”.J. Fennell - 2005 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 24 (2):85-111.
    Not only do the writings of Nietzsche – early and late – fail to support the pedagogy of self-reformulation, this doctrine embodies what for him is worst in man and would destroy that which is higher. The pedagogy of self-reformulation is also incoherent. In contrast, Nietzsche offers a fruitful and comprehensive theory of education that, while non-democratic and contemptuous of egalitarian aspirations, emerges consistently from his metaphysics and philosophical anthropology. Whatever, then, we might think of his premises, Nietzsche’s philosophy of (...)
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  • Classical Form or Modern Scientific Rationalization? Nietzsche on the Drive to Ordered Thought as Apollonian Power and Socratic Pathology.Eli I. Lichtenstein - 2021 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 52 (1):105-134.
    Nietzsche sometimes praises the drive to order—to simplify, organize, and draw clear boundaries—as expressive of a vital "classical" style, or an Apollonian artistic drive to calmly contemplate forms displaying "epic definiteness and clarity." But he also sometimes harshly criticizes order, as in the pathological dialectics or "logical schematism" that he associates paradigmatically with Socrates. I challenge a tradition that interprets Socratism as an especially one-sided expression of, or restricted form of attention to, the Apollonian: they are more radically disparate. Beyond (...)
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  • Nietzsche Contra Sublimation.Eli I. Lichtenstein - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (4):755-778.
    Many commentators have claimed that Nietzsche views the “sublimation” (Sublimierung) of drives as a positive achievement. Against this tradition, I argue that, on the dominant if not universal Nietzschean use of Sublimierung and its cognates, sublimation is just a broad psychological analogue of the traditional (al)chemical process: the “vaporization” of drives into a finer or lighter state, figuratively if not literally. This can yield ennobling elevation, or purity in a positive sense—the intensified “sublimate” of an unrefined original sample. But it (...)
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  • Nietzsche on Truth, Illusion, and Redemption.R. Lanier Anderson - 2005 - European Journal of Philosophy 13 (2):185–225.
  • Noble Markets: The Noble/Slave Ethic in Hayek’s Free Market Capitalism.Edward J. Romar - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (1):57-66.
    Friedrich A. von Hayek influenced many areas of inquiry including economics, psychology and political theory. This article will offer one possible interpretation of the ethical foundation of Hayek's political and social contributions to libertarianism and free market capitalism by analyzing several of his important non-economic publications, primarily The Road to Serfdom, The Fatal Conceit, The Constitution of Liberty and Law, Legislation and Liberty. While Hayek did not offer a particular ethical foundation for free market capitalism, he argued consistently that free (...)
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  • Nietzsche's Metaphysics in the Birth of Tragedy.Béatrice Han-Pile - 2006 - European Journal of Philosophy 14 (3):373–403.
  • Being in Others: Empathy From a Psychoanalytical Perspective.Sarah Richmond - 2004 - European Journal of Philosophy 12 (2):244–264.
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  • Three Essays Against Nietzsche.Andrew Collier - 2011 - Journal of Critical Realism 10 (2):219-242.
    These essays defend Christian, socialist and realist positions against Nietzsche’s critiques. Each essay addresses a problem in Nietzsche’s work. The first deals with perspectivism. On his view, the idea of objectivity disappears, becoming no more than simply a multiplicity of perspectives. The essay shows how Nietzsche’s approach to knowledge commits the epistemic fallacy, i.e. evades questions about truth by collapsing them into questions about knowing. The second essay addresses Nietzsche’s moral psychology in which there is no being behind doing, no (...)
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  • Nietzschean Constructivism: Ethics and Metaethics for All and None.Alex Silk - 2015 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 58 (3):244-280.
    This paper develops an interpretation of Nietzsche’s ethics and metaethics that reconciles his apparent antirealism with his engagement in normative discourse. Interpreting Nietzsche as a metaethical constructivist—as holding, to a first approximation, that evaluative facts are grounded purely in facts about the evaluative attitudes of the creatures to whom they apply—reconciles his vehement declarations that nothing is valuable in itself with his passionate expressions of a particular evaluative perspective and injunctions for the free spirits to create new values. Drawing on (...)
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  • The Most Agreeable of All Vices: Nietzsche as Virtue Epistemologist.Mark Alfano - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (4):767-790.
    It’s been argued with some justice by commentators from Walter Kaufmann to Thomas Hurka that Nietzsche’s positive ethical position is best understood as a variety of virtue theory – in particular, as a brand of perfectionism. For Nietzsche, value flows from character. Less attention has been paid, however, to the details of the virtues he identifies for himself and his type. This neglect, along with Nietzsche’s frequent irony and non-standard usage, has obscured the fact that almost all the virtues he (...)
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  • Nietzsche's Fourfold Conception of the Self.Robert Miner - 2011 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 54 (4):337-360.
    Abstract Struck by essentialist and anti-essentialist elements in his writings, Nietzsche's readers have wondered whether his conception of the self is incoherent or paradoxical. This paper demonstrates that his conception of the self, while complex, is not paradoxical or incoherent, but contains four distinct levels. Section I shows Schopenhauer as Educator to contain an early description of the four levels: (1) a person's deepest self, embracing all that cannot be educated or molded; (2) a person's ego; (3) a person's ?ideal? (...)
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  • Nietzsche's Will to Power as a Doctrine of the Unity of Science.R. Lanier Anderson - 2005 - Angelaki 10 (1):77 – 93.
    (2005). Nietzsche's will to Power as a Doctrine of the Unity of Science. Angelaki: Vol. 10, continental philosophy and the sciences the german traditionissue editor: damian veal, pp. 77-93.
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  • Nietzsche and the “Self‐Mockery of Reason”.Samir Gandesha - 1998 - The European Legacy 3 (4):96-108.
  • Moritz Schlick, Kritische Gesamtausgabe, Herausgegeben von Friedrich Stadler Und Hans-Jürgen Wendel: Die Wiener Zeit. Aufsätze, Beiträge Rezensionen 1926–1936, Abteilung I, Band 6. [REVIEW]Thomas Mormann - 2009 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 40 (1):155-160.
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  • Unmasking Nihilism. [REVIEW]Alan N. Woolfolk - 1985 - Human Studies 8 (1):85-96.
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  • National Socialism and the Disintegration of Values: Reflections on Nietzsche, Rosenberg, and Broch. [REVIEW]Mark W. Roche - 1992 - Journal of Value Inquiry 26 (3):367-380.
  • A Evaluation of Nietzsche’s Anti-Democratic Pedagogy: The Overman, Perspectivism, and Self-Overcoming.Mark E. Jonas - 2009 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 28 (2):153-169.
    In this paper, I argue that Friedrich Nietzsche’s concept of self-overcoming has been largely misinterpreted in the philosophy of education journals. The misinterpretation partially stems from a misconstruction of Nietzsche’s perspectivism, and leads to a conception of self-overcoming that is inconsistent with Nietzsche’s educational ideals. To show this, I examine some of the prominent features of the so-called “debate” of the 1980s surrounding Nietzsche’s conception of self-overcoming. I then offer an alternative conception that is more consistent with Nietzsche’s thought, and (...)
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  • Pascal's Syndrome: Positivism as a Symptom of Depression and Mania.Hiram Caton - 1986 - Zygon 21 (3):319-351.
    . The present study applies results and methods of psychobiology to intellectual history. Pascal's syndrome is a depressive neurosis associated with morbid effects of scientific certainty. The syndrome is characterized by self‐mortification and conversion experience that represses distressing certainties. The dynamics of the syndrome are assessed from Blake Pascal's psychosis. The ideation of the syndrome is evaluated by reference to the neurology of altered states of consciousness and the biogenic amine hypothesis of depression and mania. The evaluation yields a description (...)
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  • Philosophical Themes in Mass Effect.Michael Aristidou & Brian Basallo - 2014 - Open Journal of Philosophy 4 (2):174-181.
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  • Nietzsche's Will To Power As A Doctrine Of The Unity Of Science.R. Lanier Anderson - 1993 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 25 (5):729-750.
  • How the Free Spirit Became Free: Sickness and Romanticism in Nietzsche's 1886 Prefaces.David Mitchell - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (5):946 - 966.
    This paper explores Nietzsche's account of the free spirit's genesis, as primarily given in the 1886 prefaces written for the works of his ?free spirit trilogy?. In particular, it will focus on how what will be argued is the free spirit's distinguishing capacity for radical questioning is created out of the process described there. That is, it will examine how what Nietzsche calls, ?the experience of sickness?, in enabling the free spirit's liberation, helps forge a mode of philosophical awareness which (...)
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  • Nietzsche and the Politics of Nationalism.Don Dombowsky - 1999 - The European Legacy 4 (5):23-36.
  • Nietzsche's Political Confusion.Iain Morrisson - 2003 - Theoria 69 (3):184-210.
  • Spinoza and Jeffers on Man in Nature.George Sessions - 1977 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 20 (1-4):481 – 528.
    Western society has been diverted from the goal of spiritual freedom and autonomy as expressed in the ancient Pythagorean 'theory of the cosmos'. Indeed, following Heidegger's analysis, it can be seen that modern Western society has arrived at the opposite pole of anthropocentric 'absolute subjectivism' in which the entire non-human world is seen as a material resource to be consumed in the satisfaction of our egoistic passive desires. It is further argued that Spinozism is actually a modern version of the (...)
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  • Nietzsche and the Cultural Resonance of the ‘Death of God’.R. H. Roberts - 1989 - History of European Ideas 11 (1-6):1025-1035.
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