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Michael C. Keeley (1990). [Book Review] a Social-Contract Theory of Organizations. [REVIEW]

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  1.  6
    An Ethical Analysis of Emotional Labor.Bruce Barry, Mara Olekalns & Laura Rees - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-18.
    Our understanding of emotional labor, while conceptually and empirically substantial, is normatively impoverished: very little has been said or written expressly about its ethical dimensions or ramifications. Emotional labor refers to efforts undertaken by employees to make their private feelings and/or public emotion displays consistent with job and organizational requirements. We formally define emotional labor, briefly summarize research in organizational behavior and social psychology on the causes and consequences of emotional labor, and present a normative analysis of its moral limits (...)
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  2.  8
    Justice and Corporate Governance: New Insights From Rawlsian Social Contract and Sen’s Capabilities Approach.Magali Fia & Lorenzo Sacconi - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-24.
    By considering what we identify as a problem inherent in the ‘nature of the firm’—the risk of abuse of authority—we propound the conception of a social contract theory of the firm which is truly Rawlsian in its inspiration. Hence, we link the social contract theory of the firm with the general theory of justice. Through this path, we enter the debate about whether firms can be part of Rawlsian theory of justice showing that corporate governance principles enter the “basic structure.” (...)
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  3.  21
    Order Ethics: Bridging the Gap Between Contractarianism and Business Ethics.Christoph Luetge, Thomas Armbrüster & Julian Müller - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (4):687-697.
    Contract-based approaches have been a focus of attention in business ethics. As one of the grand traditions in political philosophy, contractarianism is founded on the notion that we will never resolve deep moral disagreement. Classical philosophers like Hobbes and Locke, or recent ones like Rawls and Gaus, seek to solve ethical conflicts on the level of social rules and procedures. Recent authors in business ethics have sought to utilize contract-based approaches for their field and to apply it to concrete business (...)
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  4.  9
    Where the Facts End: Richard De George and the Rise of Business Ethics.Thomas Donaldson - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 127 (4):783-787.
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  5.  21
    “Equality Theory” as a Counterbalance to Equity Theory in Human Resource Management.David A. Morand & Kimberly K. Merriman - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (1):133-144.
    This conceptual paper revisits the concept of equality as a base of distributive justice and contends that it is underspecified, both theoretically and in terms of its ethical and pragmatic application to human resource management (HRM) within organizations. Prior organizational literature focuses primarily upon distributive equality of remunerative outcomes within small groups and implicitly employs an equity-based conception of inputs to define equality. In contrast, through exposition of the philosophical roots of equality principles, we reconceptualize inputs as de facto equal (...)
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  6.  25
    The Global Economic Ethic Manifesto: Implementing a Moral Values Foundation in the Multinational Enterprise. [REVIEW]Thomas A. Hemphill & Waheeda Lillevik - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (2):213 - 230.
    The Global Economic Ethic Manifesto (" Manifesto") is a moral framework/code of conduct which is both interactive and interdependent with the economic function of the main institutions of the economic system: markets, governments, civil society, and supranational organizations, which lays out a common fundamental vision of what is legitimate, just, and fair in economic activities. The Manifesto includes five universally accepted principles and values: the principle of humanity; the basic values of non-violence and respect for life; the basic values of (...)
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  7. A Political Account of Corporate Moral Responsibility.Jeffery Smith - 2011 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (2):223 - 246.
    Should we conceive of corporations as entities to which moral responsibility can be attributed? This contribution presents what we will call a political account of corporate moral responsibility. We argue that in modern, liberal democratic societies, there is an underlying political need to attribute greater levels of moral responsibility to corporations. Corporate moral responsibility is essential to the maintenance of social coordination that both advances social welfare and protects citizens' moral entitlements. This political account posits a special capacity of self-governance (...)
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  8.  5
    “Organizational Terrorism” and Moral Choices – Exercising Voice When the Leader is the Problem.Cam Caldwell & Mayra Canuto-Carranco - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (1):159-171.
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  9.  45
    "Organizational Terrorism" and Moral Choices — Exercising Voice When the Leader is the Problem.Mayra Canuto-Carranco - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (1):159 - 171.
    We introduce the concept of "organizational terrorism" to describe dysfunctional leaders who are abusive and who treat organizational members with contempt and disregard. After identifying the moral duties of leaders in organizations, we explain how organization members respond to their dissatisfaction with organizations through Exit, Voice, Loyalty, or Neglect. We explain why exercising voice is the most effective moral choice in dealing with dysfunctional leaders.
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  10.  28
    Advancing Integrative Social Contracts Theory: A Habermasian Perspective.Dirk Ulrich Gilbert & Michael Behnam - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (2):215-234.
    We critically assess integrative social contracts theory (ISCT) and show that the concept particularly lacks of moral justification of substantive hypernorms. By drawing on Habermasian philosophy, in particular discourse ethics and its recent application in the theory of deliberative democracy , we further advance ISCT and show that social contracting in business ethics requires a well-justified procedural rather than a substantive focus for managing stakeholder relations. We also replace the monological concept of hypothetical thought experiments in ISCT by a concept (...)
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  11.  11
    Insights From a Management Prophet: Mary Parker Follett on Social Entrepreneurship.Michele Simms - 2009 - Business and Society Review 114 (3):349-363.
    ABSTRACTCurrent‐day management leaders such as Peter Drucker and Rosabeth Moss Kanter have cited Mary Parker Follett as guru and prophet given her foreknowledge of systems theory, action research and leadership. She viewed business as a social institution and work itself as a community service, concepts particularly relevant in the context of understanding social entrepreneurship. Referencing two of her works, “The Individual in Society” and “Business in Society”, this paper introduces Follett, defines social entrepreneurship and presents her ideas as timely insights (...)
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  12. Stakeholder’s Preference and Rational Compliance: A Comment on Sacconi’s “CSR as a Model for Extended Corporate Governance II: Compliance, Reputation and Reciprocity”.Pedro Francés-Gómez & Ariel del Rio - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (1):59-76.
    Lorenzo Sacconi's recent re-statement of his social contract account of business ethics is a major contribution to our understanding of the normative nature of CSR as the expression of a fair multi-party agreement supported by the economic rationality of each participant. However, at one crucial point in his theory, Sacconi introduces the concept of stakeholders' conformist preferences - their disposition to punish the firm if it defects from the agreement, refusing to abide by its own explicit CSR policies and norms. (...)
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  13.  71
    Opportunities and Problems of Standardized Ethics Initiatives – a Stakeholder Theory Perspective.Dirk Ulrich Gilbert & Andreas Rasche - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (3):755-773.
    This article explains problems and opportunities created by standardized ethics initiatives (e.g., the UN Global Compact, the Global Reporting Initiative, and SA 8000) from the perspective of stakeholder theory. First, we outline differences and commonalities among currently existing initiatives and thus generate a common ground for our discussion. Second, based on these remarks, we critically evaluate standardized ethics initiatives by drawing on descriptive, instrumental, and normative stakeholder theory. In doing so, we explain why these standards are helpful tools when it (...)
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  14.  41
    Returning to Rawls: Social Contracting, Social Justice, and Transcending the Limitations of Locke.Richard Marens - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 75 (1):63-76.
    A generation ago, the field of business ethics largely abandoned analyzing the broader issue of social justice to focus upon more micro concerns. Donaldson applied the social contract tradition of Locke and Rawls to the ethics of management decision-making, and with Dunfee, has advanced this project ever since. Current events suggest that if the field is to remain relevant it needs to return to examining social and economic fairness, and Rawl's approach to social contracting suggests a way to start. First, (...)
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  15.  20
    The Autonomy of the Contracting Partners: An Argument for Heuristic Contractarian Business Ethics. [REVIEW]Gjalt de Graaf - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 68 (3):347-361.
    Due to the domain characteristics of business ethics, a contractarian theory for business ethics will need to be essentially different from the contract model as it is applied to other domains. Much of the current criticism of contractarian business ethics (CBE) can be traced back to autonomy, one of its three boundary conditions. After explaining why autonomy is so important, this article considers the notion carefully vis à vis the contracting partners in the contractarian approaches in business ethics. Autonomy is (...)
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  16.  67
    A Critical Perspective of Integrative Social Contracts Theory: Recurring Criticisms and Next Generation Research Topics.Thomas W. Dunfee - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 68 (3):303-328.
    During the past ten years Integrative Social Contracts Theory (ISCT) has become part of the repertoire of specialized decision-oriented theories in the business ethics literature. The intention here is to (1)␣provide a brief overview of the structure and strengths of ISCT; (2) identify recurring themes in the extensive commentary on the theory including brief mention of how ISCT has been applied outside the business ethics literature; (3) describe where research appears to be headed; and (4) specify challenges faced by those (...)
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  17.  37
    Foundations and Applications for Contractualist Business Ethics.Pursey P. M. A. R. Heugens, J. & Muel Kaptein - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 68 (3):211-228.
    Contractualism is one of the most promising ‘centers of gravity’ in business ethics. In this guest editorial we provide a concise roadmap to the field, sketching contractualism’s historic and disciplinary antecedents, the basic argumentative structure of the contract model, and its boundary conditions. We also sketch two main dimensions along which contributions to the contractualist tradition can be positioned. The first dimension entails positive versus normative theorizing – does a given contribution analyze the world as it is or how it (...)
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  18.  55
    Psychological Contracts: A Nano-Level Perspective on Social Contract Theory.Jeffery A. Thompson & David W. Hart - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 68 (3):229-241.
    Social contract theory has been criticized as a “theory in search of application.” We argue that incorporating the nano, or individual, level of analysis into social contract inquiry will yield more descriptive theory. We draw upon the psychological contract perspective to address two critiques of social contract theory: its rigid macro-orientation and inattention to the process of contract formation. We demonstrate how a psychological contract approach offers practical insight into the impact of social contracting on day-to-day human interaction. We then (...)
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  19.  23
    A Framework for Organizational Virtue: The Interrelationship of Mission, Culture and Leadership.J. Thomas Whetstone - 2005 - Business Ethics 14 (4):367-378.
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  20.  3
    A Framework for Organizational Virtue: The Interrelationship of Mission, Culture and Leadership.J. Thomas Whetstone - 2005 - Business Ethics: A European Review 14 (4):367-378.
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  21.  14
    Rethinking Organizational Ethics: A Plea for Pluralism.J. Oosterhout, Ben Wempe & Theo van Willigenburg - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 55 (4):387 - 395.
    This paper challenges a pervasive, if not always explicit assumption of the present state of theorising in business ethics. This is the idea that a workable theory of organizational ethics must provide a unified perspective on its subject matter. In this paper we will sketch the broad outlines of an alternative understanding of business ethics, which focuses on constraints on corporate conduct that cannot reasonably be rejected. These constraints stem from at least three different levels or spheres of social reality, (...)
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  22.  17
    A Precis of a Communicative Theory of the Firm.Jeffery D. Smith - 2004 - Business Ethics 13 (4):317-331.
  23.  4
    A Precis of a Communicative Theory of the Firm.Jeffery D. Smith - 2004 - Business Ethics: A European Review 13 (4):317-331.
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  24.  5
    Rethinking Organizational Ethics: A Plea for Pluralism.J. van Oosterhout, Ben Wempe & Theo van Willigenburg - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 55 (4):387-395.
    This paper challenges a pervasive, if not always explicit assumption of the present state of theorising in business ethics. This is the idea that a workable theory of organizational ethics must provide a unified perspective on its subject matter. In this paper we will sketch the broad outlines of an alternative understanding of business ethics, which focuses on constraints on corporate conduct that cannot reasonably be rejected. These constraints stem from at least three different levels or spheres of social reality, (...)
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  25.  90
    Defining Privacy in Employee Health Screening Cases: Ethical Ramifications Concerning the Employee/Employer Relationship. [REVIEW]Michele Simms - 1994 - Journal of Business Ethics 13 (5):315 - 325.
    Issues of privacy and employee health screening rank as two of the most important ethical concerns organizations will face in the next five years. Despite the increasing numbers of social scientists researching personal privacy and the current focus on workplace privacy rights as one of the most dynamic areas of employment law, the concept of privacy remains relatively abstract. Understanding how the courts define privacy and use the expectation of privacy standards is paramount given the strategic importance of the law (...)
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  26.  23
    Empiricism in Business Ethics: Suggested Research Directions. [REVIEW]Diana C. Robertson - 1993 - Journal of Business Ethics 12 (8):585 - 599.
    This paper considers future directions of empirical research in business ethics and presents a series of recommendations. Greater emphasis should be placed on the normative basis of empirical studies, behavior (rather than attitudes) should be established as the key dependent variable, theoretical models of ethical decision making should be tested, and empirical studies need to focus on theory-building. Extensions of methodology and the unit of analysis are proposed together with recommendations concerning the need for replication and validity, and building links (...)
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  27.  16
    Ethics in MBA Programs: The Rhetoric, the Reality, and a Plan of Action. [REVIEW]Jai Ghorpade - 1991 - Journal of Business Ethics 10 (12):891 - 905.
    Unethical behavior on the part of business corporations and their leaders has led many business executives and university administrators to call for the inclusion of ethics in MBA programs. This paper reviewed studies and commentary relating to the teaching of ethics in MBA programs in the United States. The results showed that ethics has not yet gained an integral place in the curricula of business schools. A plan of action for the systematic incorporation of ethics into the MBA curriculum was (...)
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