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Reflections on Gender and Science

Yale University Press (1996)

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  1. What Is Epistemic Public Trust in Science?Gürol Irzik & Faik Kurtulmus - 2019 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 70 (4):1145-1166.
    We provide an analysis of the public's having warranted epistemic trust in science, that is, the conditions under which the public may be said to have well-placed trust in the scientists as providers of information. We distinguish between basic and enhanced epistemic trust in science and provide necessary conditions for both. We then present the controversy regarding the connection between autism and measles–mumps–rubella vaccination as a case study to illustrate our analysis. The realization of warranted epistemic public trust in science (...)
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  • The Crisis in Psychoanalysis: Resolution Through Husserlian Phenomenology and Feminism. [REVIEW]Marilyn Nissim-Sabat - 1991 - Human Studies 14 (1):33 - 66.
  • Beyond Culture?: Nature/Culture Dualism and the Christian Otherworldly.Anne Elvey - 2006 - Ethics and the Environment 11 (2):63-84.
    : As Val Plumwood argues, the Christian otherworldly is ecologically problematic. In relation to time, space, being and agency, this article considers the tendency to dualism in Christian appeals to the otherworldly. In the context of Plumwood's critique of nature-skepticism, I ask whether we should also critique an otherworldly skepticism. I then set out five possibilities for understanding the Christian otherworldly in relation to nature and culture. I argue that the otherworldly can be understood not only as a problematic cultural (...)
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  • Animal Cultures, Subjectivity, and Knowledge: Symmetrical Reflections Beyond the Great Divide.Richie Nimmo - 2012 - Society and Animals 20 (2):173-192.
    This article reflects upon the implications for sociology of the steady accumulation of evidence in the sciences of animal behavior pointing to the existence of culture among nonhuman animals. With a particular focus on primatology, it explores how these developments challenge the notions of “culture” that continue to inform the study of human social life. The article argues that this growing challenge to the assumption of human uniqueness that has historically provided the core rationale for sociology cannot be ignored. The (...)
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  • Naturalized Epistemology, Morality, and the Real World.Louise M. Antony - 2000 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 30 (Supplement):103-137.
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  • Feminist Philosophy of Science: Standpoint Matters.Alison Wylie - 2012 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophy Association 86 (2):47-76.
    Standpoint theory is an explicitly political as well as social epistemology. Its central insight is that epistemic advantage may accrue to those who are oppressed by structures of domination and discounted as knowers. Feminist standpoint theorists hold that gender is one dimension of social differentiation that can make such a difference. In response to two longstanding objections I argue that epistemically consequential standpoints need not be conceptualized in essentialist terms, and that they do not confer automatic or comprehensive epistemic privilege (...)
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  • Dilemmas of Objectivity.Marianne Janack - 2002 - Social Epistemology 16 (3):267 – 281.
  • Is Confucianism Compatible with Care Ethics? A Critique.Ranjoo Seodu Herr - 2003 - Philosophy East and West 53 (4):471-489.
    This essay critically examines a suggestion proposed by some Confucianists that Confucianism and Care Ethics share striking similarities and that feminism in Confucian societies might take “a new form of Confucianism.” Aspects of Confucianism and Care Ethics that allegedly converge are examined, including the emphasis on human relationships, and it is argued that while these two perspectives share certain surface similarities, moral injunctions entailed by their respective ideals of ren and caring are not merely distinctive but in fact incompatible.
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  • Did Habermas Cede Nature to the Positivists?Gordon R. Mitchell - 2003 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 36 (1):1-21.
  • A Philosophical Study of Values and Valuing in Sexuality Education.Ronald William Morris - unknown
    The enthusiasm for a positivistic approach to sexuality education has begun to subside. Recognizing that sexuality is more than a biological phenomenon, and that education is more than just information, sexuality educators throughout North America are now acknowledging the importance of values. There are two problems, however, with the philosophical orientation on values within the literature. The first problem is the pervasive view that teachers should remain neutral to facilitate value clarification. The commitment to neutrality is often based on an (...)
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  • A Phenomenological Account of Practices.Matthew Louis Drabek - unknown
    Appeals to practices are common the humanities and social sciences. They hold the potential to explain interesting or compelling similarities, insofar as similarities are distributed within a community or group. Why is it that people who fall under the same category, whether men, women, Americans, baseball players, Buddhists, feminists, white people, or others, have interesting similarities, such as similar beliefs, actions, thoughts, foibles, and failings? One attractive answer is that they engage in the same practices. They do the same things, (...)
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  • It Isn't The Thought That Counts.Miriam Solomon - 2001 - Argumentation 15 (1):67-75.
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  • Toward a Queer Ecofeminism.Greta Gaard - 1997 - Hypatia 12 (1):114-137.
    Although many ecofeminists acknowledge heterosexism as a problem, a systematic exploration of the potential intersections of ecofeminist and queer theories has yet to be made. By interrogating social constructions of the "natural," the various uses of Christianity as a logic of domination, and the rhetoric of colonialism, this essay finds those theoretical intersections and argues for the importance of developing a queer ecofeminism.
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  • In Defense of Bacon.Alan Soble - 1995 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 25 (2):192-215.
    Feminist science critics, in particular Sandra Harding, Carolyn Merchant, and Evelyn Fox Keller, claim that misogynous sexual metaphors played an important role in the rise of modern science. The writings of Francis Bacon have been singled out as an especially egregious instance of the use of misogynous metaphors in scientific philosophy. This paper offers a defense of Bacon.
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  • Clocks, Creation and Clarity: Insights on Ethics and Economics From a Feminist Perspective.Julie A. Nelson - 2004 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 7 (4):381-398.
    This essay discusses the origins, biases, and effects on contemporary discussions of economics and ethics of the unexamined use of the metaphor an economy is a machine. Both neoliberal economics and many critiques of capitalist systems take this metaphor as their starting point. The belief that economies run according to universal laws of motion, however, is shown to be based on a variety of rationalist thinking that – while widely held – is inadequate for explaining lived human experience. Feminist scholarship (...)
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  • Feminist Philosophy of Science1.Lynn Hankinson Nelson - 2002 - In Peter Machamer Michael Silberstein (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Science. Blackwell. pp. 312.
  • Colonialismo/Modernidad/Ciencia. Análisis feminista de una interrelación.Erika Müller - 2001 - SASKAB: Revista de Discusiones Filosóficas desde Acá 3 (1).
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  • Neuroethics, Gender and the Response to Difference.Deboleena Roy - 2012 - Neuroethics 5 (3):217-230.
    This paper examines how the new field of neuroethics is responding to the old problem of difference, particularly to those ideas of biological difference emerging from neuroimaging research that purports to further delineate our understanding of sex and/or gender differences in the brain. As the field develops, it is important to ask what is new about neuroethics compared to bioethics in this regard, and whether the concept of difference is being problematized within broader contexts of power and representation. As a (...)
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  • The History of Sexual Anatomy and Self-Referential Philosophy of Science.Alan G. Soble - 2003 - Metaphilosophy 34 (3):229-249.
    This essay is a case study of the self-destruction that occurs in the work of a social-constructionist historian of science who embraces a radical philosophy of science. It focuses on Thomas Laqueur's Making Sex: Body and Gender from the Greeks to Freud in arguing that a history of science committed to the social construction of science and to the central theses of Kuhnian, Duhemian, and Quinean philosophy of science is incoherent through self-reference. Laqueur's text is examined in detail in order (...)
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  • Ethics, Evidence and International Debt.Julie A. Nelson - 2009 - Journal of Economic Methodology 16 (2):175-189.
    The assumption that contracts are largely impersonal, rational, voluntary agreements drawn up between self-interested individual agents is a convenient fiction, necessary for analysis using conventional economic methods. Papers prepared for a recent conference on ethics and international debt were shaped by just such an assumption. The adequacy of this approach is, however, challenged by evidence about who is affected by international debt, how contracts are actually made and followed, the behavior of actors in financial markets, and the motivations of scholars (...)
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  • Constructing the Child in Psychology: The Child-as-Primitive in Hall and Piaget.Ann Johnson - 1995 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 26 (2):35-57.
    This analysis focuses on a particular sedimented construction of the child found in child development theory. In traditional developmental theory the child is conceptualized as being qualitatively different from the adult; the child is conceived as "other" and as an incomplete version of the adult. The historical roots of this construction of meaning are explored through examination of two influential contributors in the child development field, G. S. Hall and Jean Piaget. The source of Hall's conception of the "child-as-primitive" in (...)
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  • A Socially Relevant Philosophy of Science? Resources From Standpoint Theory's Controversiality.Sandra Harding - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (1):25-47.
    : Feminist standpoint theory remains highly controversial: it is widely advocated, used to guide research and justify its results, and yet is also vigorously denounced. This essay argues that three such sites of controversy reveal the value of engaging with standpoint theory as a way of reflecting on and debating some of the most anxiety-producing issues in contemporary Western intellectual and political life. Engaging with standpoint theory enables a socially relevant philosophy of science.
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  • Feminist Epistemology as Social Epistemology.Heidi Grasswick - 2002 - Social Epistemology 16 (3):185-196.
    More than one philosopher has expressed puzzlement at the very idea of feminist epistemology. Metaphysics and epistemology, sometimes called the 'core' areas of philosophy, are supposed to be immune to questions of value and justice. Nevertheless, many philosophers have raised epistemological questions starting from feminist-motivated moral and political concerns. The field is burgeoning; a search of the Philosopher's Index reveals that although nothing was published before 1981 that was categorized as both feminist and epistemology, soon after, the rate of publication (...)
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  • Gender, Metaphor, and the Definition of Economics: Julie A. Nelson.Julie A. Nelson - 1992 - Economics and Philosophy 8 (1):103-125.
    Let me make it clear from the outset that my main point is not either of the following: one, that there should be more women economists and research on “women's issues”, or two, that women as a class do, or should do, economics in a manner different from men. My argument is different and has to do with trying to gain an understanding of how a certain way of thinking about gender and a certain way of thinking about economics have (...)
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  • Well-Ordered Science and Public Trust in Science.Gürol Irzik & Faik Kurtulmus - forthcoming - Synthese.
    Building, restoring and maintaining well-placed trust between scientists and the public is a difficult yet crucial social task requiring the successful cooperation of various social actors and institutions. Philip Kitcher’s takes up this challenge in the context of liberal democratic societies by extending his ideal model of “well-ordered science” that he had originally formulated in his. However, Kitcher nowhere offers an explicit account of what it means for the public to invest epistemic trust in science. Yet in order to understand (...)
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  • Helping Thought and Keeping It Pragmatical, or, Why Experience Plays Practical Jokes.Mary Magada-Ward - 2005 - Contemporary Pragmatism 2 (2):63-71.
    In claiming that "the method of our great teacher, Experience" is "a system of teaching by practical jokes," Peirce's objective, I argue, is to get us to see the unexpected as cause for neither despair nor nihilism but as an opportunity to strengthen our affinity with the natural world. Peirce's celebration of the flexibility demanded by the "pedagogic method" employed by "Dame Experience" reinforces the dependence between cultivating a sense of humor and developing fruitful habits of inquiry.
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  • Social and Gendered Readings of Illness Narratives.Muriel Lederman - 2016 - Journal of Medical Humanities 37 (3):275-288.
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  • Unconscious Influences on Discourses About Consciousness: Ideology, State-Specific Science and Unformulated Experience.David Edwards - 2005 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 5 (1):1-20.
    Discussions about consciousness are complicated by the fact that participants do not share a common underlying “ordinary” consciousness. Everyday experience is founded on what Teasdale calls implicational cognition, much of which is not verbally formulated. An unacknowledged aspect of debate is individuals’ attempts to negotiate the expression of their unformulated experience. This is further complicated by the way in which a discourse, based on particular ontological assumptions, exercises an ideological control which limits what underlying aspects of experience can be formulated (...)
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  • Mythic and Theoretic Aspects of the Concept of 'the Unconscious' in Popular and Psychological Discourse.David Edwards - 2003 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 3 (1):1-14.
    It could be argued that mythology dramatizes aspects of our relationship with potent forces of which we have little understanding and over which we have little control. Moreover, many of these forces are less concrete than the forces of nature and arise from an apprehension of our existential predicaments, our interpersonal vulnerability and the intensity of our own psychological pain. This paper argues that in many contemporary discourses this territory is referred to more neutrally as ‘the unconscious'. Within this framework, (...)
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  • Why Gender is a Relevant Factor in the Social Epistemology of Scientific Inquiry.Kristina Rolin - 2002 - Philosophy of Science 71 (5):880-891.
    In recent years, feminist philosophy of science has been subjected to criticism. The debate has focused on the implications of the underdetermination thesis for accounts of the role of social values in scientific reasoning. My aim here is to offer a different approach. I suggest that feminist philosophers of science contribute to our understanding of science by (1) producing gender‐sensitive analyses of the social dimensions of scientific inquiry and (2) examining the relevance of these analyses for normative issues in philosophy (...)
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  • Sex-Related Differences in Precocious Mathematical Reasoning Ability: Not Illusory, Not Easily Explained.Camilla Persson Benbow - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):217-232.
  • The Forgotten Realm of Genetic Differences.Ada Zohar & Ruth Guttman - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):217-217.
  • Neuroanatomical Sex Differences: Of No Consequence for Cognition?Sandra F. Witelson - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):215-217.
  • Factors Influencing Educational Productivity.Herbert J. Walberg - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):214-215.
  • Bias and Sampling Error in Sex Difference Research.Douglas Wahlsten - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):214-214.
  • Could These Sex Differences Be Due to Genes?Steven G. Vandenberg - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):212-214.
  • Sex Differences in Mathematics: Why the Fuss?Lionel Tiger - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):212-212.
  • On Throwing Bones to Environmentalists.Donald Symons - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):212-212.
  • Hormones and Sexual Differentiation.Heidi H. Swanson - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):211-212.
  • The Male/Female Difference is There: Should We Care?Robert J. Steinberg - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):210-211.
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  • Causes of Things and Nature of Things: Advice From Hughlings Jackson.Daniel W. Smothergill - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):210-210.
  • Neuropsychological Factors and Mathematical Reasoning Ability.Alan Searleman - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):209-210.
  • Mathematical Ability, Spatial Ability, and Remedial Training.Barbara Sanders - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):208-209.
  • Evaluating Explanations of Sex Differences in Mathematical Reasoning Scores.Robert Rosenthal - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):207-208.
  • Mathematics, Sex Hormones, and Brain Function.Helmuth Nyborg - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):206-207.
  • Nature/Nurture in Male/Female Mathematical Giftedness.Nora Newcombe & Mary Ann Baenninger - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):206-206.
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  • Mathematics as Male Pathology.John Money - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):205-206.
  • Rival Hypotheses About Sex Differences in Mathematics: Problems and Possibilities.Carol J. Mills - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):204-205.
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  • Socialization Versus Biology: Time to Move On.Diane McGuinness - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):203-204.
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  • What We Really Need is a Theory of Mathematical Ability.Richard E. Mayer - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):202-203.