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  1. Psychosis and Autism as Diametrical Disorders of the Social Brain.Bernard Crespi & Christopher Badcock - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (3):241-261.
    Autistic-spectrum conditions and psychotic-spectrum conditions (mainly schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression) represent two major suites of disorders of human cognition, affect, and behavior that involve altered development and function of the social brain. We describe evidence that a large set of phenotypic traits exhibit diametrically opposite phenotypes in autistic-spectrum versus psychotic-spectrum conditions, with a focus on schizophrenia. This suite of traits is inter-correlated, in that autism involves a general pattern of constrained overgrowth, whereas schizophrenia involves undergrowth. These disorders also (...)
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  • Dominic Murphy Psychiatry in the Scientific Image.Robin Brown - 2009 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 60 (3):673-678.
  • Evolutionary Psychiatry and Nosology: Prospects and Limitations.Luc Faucher - 2012 - The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 7.
    In this paper, I explain why evolutionary psychiatry is not where the next revolution in psychiatry will come from. I will proceed as follows. Firstly, I will review some of the problems commonly attributed to current nosologies, more specifically to the DSM. One of these problems is the lack of a clear and consensual definition of mental disorder; I will then examine specific attempts to spell out such a definition that use the evolutionary framework. One definition that deserves particular attention, (...)
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  • Is Psychopathy a Harmful Dysfunction?Marko Jurjako - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (5):1-23.
    In their paper “Is psychopathy a mental disease?”, Thomas Nadelhoffer and Walter Sinnott-Armstrong argue that according to any plausible account of mental disorder, neural and psychological abnormalities correlated with psychopathy should be regarded as signs of a mental disorder. I oppose this conclusion by arguing that at least on a naturalistically grounded account, such as Wakefield’s ‘Harmful Dysfunction’ view, currently available empirical data and evolutionary considerations indicate that psychopathy is not a mental disorder. For an online version of the paper, (...)
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  • Animal Models May Help Fractionate Shared and Discrete Pathways Underpinning Schizophrenia and Autism.Thomas H. J. Burne, Darryl W. Eyles & John J. McGrath - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (3):264-265.
    Crespi & Badcock (C&B) present an appealing and parsimonious synthesis arguing that schizophrenia and autism are differentially regulated by maternal versus paternal genomic imprinting, respectively. We argue that animal models related to schizophrenia and autism provide a useful platform to explore the mechanisms outlined by C&B. We also note that schizophrenia and autism share certain risk factors such as advanced paternal age. Apart from genomic imprinting, copy number variants related to advanced paternal age may also contribute to the differential trajectory (...)
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  • Nomološka mreža psihopatije.Janko Međedovic - 2015 - Institut za kriminološka i sociološka istraživanja.
  • Affective Neuronal Selection: The Nature of the Primordial Emotion Systems.Judith A. Toronchuk & George F. R. Ellis - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 3.
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  • Psychiatric Molecular Genetics and the Ethics of Social Promises.John Z. Sadler - 2011 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (1):27-34.
    A recent literature review of commentaries and ‘state of the art’ articles from researchers in psychiatric genetics (PMG) offers a consensus about progress in the science of genetics, disappointments in the discovery of new and effective treatments, and a general optimism about the future of the field. I argue that optimism for the field of psychiatric molecular genetics (PMG) is overwrought, and consider progress in the field in reference to a sample estimate of US National Institute of Mental Health funding (...)
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  • Paving the Way for an Evolutionary Social Constructivism.Andreas De Block & Bart Du Laing - 2007 - Biological Theory 2 (4):337-348.
    The idea has recently taken root that evolutionary theory and social constructivism are less antagonistic than most theorists thought, and we have even seen attempts at integrating constructivist and evolutionary approaches to human thought and behaviour. We argue in this article that although the projected integration is possible, indeed valuable, the existing attempts have tended to be vague or overly simplistic about the claims of social constructivist. We proceed by examining how to give more precision and substance to the research (...)
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  • Stranger in a Strange Land: An Optimal-Environments Account of Evolutionary Mismatch.Rick Morris - forthcoming - Synthese:1-26.
    In evolutionary medicine, researchers characterize some outcomes as evolutionary mismatch. Mismatch problems arise as the result of organisms living in environments to which they are poorly adapted, typically as the result of some rapid environmental change. Depression, anxiety, obesity, myopia, insomnia, breast cancer, dental problems, and numerous other negative health outcomes have all been characterized as mismatch problems. The exact nature of evolutionary mismatch itself is unclear, however. This leads to a lack of clarity about the sorts of problems that (...)
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  • Molecular Signatures of Natural Selection for Polymorphic Genes of the Human Dopaminergic and Serotonergic Systems: A Review.Daniel R. Taub & Joshua Page - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • Autism as the Low-Fitness Extreme of a Parentally Selected Fitness Indicator.Andrew Shaner, Geoffrey Miller & Jim Mintz - 2008 - Human Nature 19 (4):389-413.
    Siblings compete for parental care and feeding, while parents must allocate scarce resources to those offspring most likely to survive and reproduce. This could cause offspring to evolve traits that advertise health, and thereby attract parental resources. For example, experimental evidence suggests that bright orange filaments covering the heads of North American coot chicks may have evolved for this fitness-advertising purpose. Could any human mental disorders be the equivalent of dull filaments in coot chicks—low-fitness extremes of mental abilities that evolved (...)
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  • The Evolution of Decision Rules in Complex Environments.Tim W. Fawcett, Benja Fallenstein, Andrew D. Higginson, Alasdair I. Houston, Dave E. W. Mallpress, Pete C. Trimmer & John M. McNamara - 2014 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (3):153-161.
  • The Genomic Challenge to the Social Construction of Race.Jiannbin Lee Shiao, Thomas Bode, Amber Beyer & Daniel Selvig - 2012 - Sociological Theory 30 (2):67-88.
    Recent research on the human genome challenges the basic assumption that human races have no biological basis. In this article, we provide a theoretical synthesis that accepts the existence of genetic clusters consistent with certain racial classifications as well as the validity of the genomic research that has identified the clusters, without diminishing the social character of their context, meaning, production, or consequences. The first part of this article describes the social constructionist account of race as lacking biological reality, its (...)
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  • The Evolutionary Social Brain: From Genes to Psychiatric Conditions.Bernard Crespi & Christopher Badcock - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (3):284-320.
    The commentaries on our target article, reflect the multidisciplinary yet highly fragmented state of current studies of human social cognition. Progress in our understanding of the human social brain must come from studies that integrate across diverse analytic levels, using conceptual frameworks grounded in evolutionary biology.
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  • Why We Essentialize Mental Disorders.P. R. Adriaens & A. De Block - 2013 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (2):107-127.
    Essentialism is one of the most pervasive problems in mental health research. Many psychiatrists still hold the view that their nosologies will enable them, sooner or later, to carve nature at its joints and to identify and chart the essence of mental disorders. Moreover, according to recent research in social psychology, some laypeople tend to think along similar essentialist lines. The main aim of this article is to highlight a number of processes that possibly explain the persistent presence and popularity (...)
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  • Problems with the Imprinting Hypothesis of Schizophrenia and Autism.Matthew C. Keller - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (3):273-274.
    Crespi & Badcock (C&B) convincingly argue that autism and schizophrenia are diametric malfunctions of the social brain, but their core imprinting hypothesis is less persuasive. Much of the evidence they cite is unrelated to their hypothesis, is selective, or is overstated; their hypothesis lacks a clearly explained mechanism; and it is unclear how their explanation fits in with known aspects of the disorders.
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  • Evolutionary Psychiatry and the Schizophrenia Paradox: A Critique.Pieter R. Adriaens - 2007 - Biology and Philosophy 22 (4):513-528.
    Evolutionary psychiatrists invariably consider schizophrenia to be a paradox: how come natural selection has not yet eliminated the infamous ‘genes for schizophrenia’ if the disorder simply crushes the reproductive success of its carriers, if it has been around for thousands of years already, and if it has a uniform prevalence throughout the world? Usually, the answer is that the schizophrenic genotype is subject to some kind of balancing selection: the benefits it confers would then outbalance the obvious damage it does. (...)
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