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  1. Exemplarism in Moral Education: Problems with Applicability and Indoctrination.Michel Croce - 2019 - Journal of Moral Education 48 (3):291-302.
    This article introduces an account of moral education grounded in Zagzebski’s recent Exemplarist Moral Theory and discusses two problems that have to be solved for the account to become a realistic alternative to other educational models on the market, namely the limited-applicability problem and the problem of indoctrination. The first problem raises worries about the viability of the account in ordinary circumstances. The second charges the proposed educational model with indoctrinating students. The main goal of this article is to show (...)
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  • The Significance in Using Role Models to Influence Primary School Children’s Moral Development: Pilot Study.Yousra Osman - 2019 - Journal of Moral Education 48 (3):316-331.
    ABSTRACTThis article reports on a pilot study aiming to examine a role-modelling character education project through an Aristotelian framework, by adopting a virtue-led approach. Aristotle famously believed virtues should be taught to children at a young age through habituation, which gradually develops into phronesis-guided virtuosity, and he considered what nowadays is referred to as ‘role modelling’ as having a large influence on children through the emotion of emulation. Therefore, the pilot study aims to answer the question to what extent a (...)
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  • Does Aristotle Believe That Habituation is Only for Children?Wouter Sanderse - 2020 - Journal of Moral Education 49 (1):98-110.
    ABSTRACTFull virtue and practical wisdom comprise the end of neo-Aristotelian moral development, but wisdom cannot be cultivated straight away through arguments and teaching. Wisdom is integrated with, and builds upon, habituation: the acquisition of virtuous character traits through the repeated practice of corresponding virtuous actions. Habit formation equips people with a taste for, and commitment to, the good life; furthermore it provides one with discriminatory and reflective capacities to know how to act in particular circumstances. Unfortunately, habituation is often understood (...)
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  • Should Eudaimonia Structure Professional Virtue?Andreas Eriksen - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (4):605-618.
    This article develops a eudaimonistic account of professional virtue. Using the case of teaching, the article argues that professional virtue requires that role holders care about the ends of their work. Care is understood in terms of an investment of the self. Virtuous role holders are invested in their practice in a way that makes professional excellence part of their own good. Failure to care about the ends of professional practice reveals a lack of appreciation of the value of professional (...)
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  • Reason and Virtues: The Paradox of R. S. Peters on Moral Education.Graham Haydon - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (Supplement s1):173-188.
    This article examines the work of R. S. Peters on moral development and moral education, as represented in his papers collected under that name, pointing out that these writings have been relatively neglected. It approaches these writings through the lens of the ‘familiar story’ that philosophical work on this topic switched during, roughly, the 1980s from an emphasis on rational principles to an emphasis on virtues and care. Starting from what Peters called ‘the paradox of moral education’—roughly, that a rational (...)
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  • Credibility and Credulity: Monitoring Teachers for Trustworthiness.William Hare - 2007 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 41 (2):207–219.
  • Critique, Contextualism and Consensus.Jane Green - 2004 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 38 (3):511–525.
    In an epistemology of contextualism, how robust does consensus need to be for critique to be practically effective? In ‘Relativism and the Critical Potential of Philosophy of Education’ Frieda Heyting proposes a form of contextualism, but her argument raises a number of problems. The kinds of criteria that her version of contextualism will furnish provide, at best, the potential only for an immanent form of critique from within a particular practice, and the possibility that practitioners alone will adopt a general (...)
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  • Habituation: A Method for Cultivating Starting Points in the Ethical Life.Jeannie Kerr - 2011 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (4):643-655.
    The Aristotelian concept of habituation is receiving mounting and warranted interest in educational circles, but has also been subject to different lines of interpretation and critique. In this article, I bring forward Aristotle's words on habituation, and then clarify the two lines of interpretation that have developed in the contemporary philosophical literature. I argue that the mechanical interpretation contains an intellectualist bias and then argue a cognitivist view that positions habituation as the only method appropriate to cultivating the starting points (...)
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  • Aquinas on Temperance.Reginald Mary Chua - 2019 - New Blackfriars 100 (1085):5-21.
    The purpose of this essay is to explore, and clarify, some key features in Aquinas’ account of the virtue of temperance, with an eye to answering some common objections raised against a positive evaluation of temperance. In particular, I consider three features of Aquinas’ understanding of temperance: First, the role of the rational mean in temperance; second, the role of rightly ordered passions in temperance; and third, the ‘despotic’ control of reason over the passions in temperance. Along the way I (...)
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  • Virtue and the Scientist: Using Virtue Ethics to Examine Science’s Ethical and Moral Challenges.Jiin-Yu Chen - 2015 - Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (1):75-94.
    As science has grown in size and scope, it has also presented a number of ethical and moral challenges. Approaching these challenges from an ethical framework can provide guidance when engaging with them. In this article, I place science within a virtue ethics framework, as discussed by Aristotle. By framing science within virtue ethics, I discuss what virtue ethics entails for the practicing scientist. Virtue ethics holds that each person should work towards her conception of flourishing where the virtues enable (...)
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  • Cultivating Sentimental Dispositions Through Aristotelian Habituation.Jan Steutel & Ben Spiecker - 2004 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 38 (4):531-549.
  • Perspectives on Phronesis in Professional Nursing Practice.Karen Jenkins, Elizabeth Anne Kinsella & Sandra DeLuca - 2019 - Nursing Philosophy 20 (1):e12231.
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  • The Virtues of Will-Power – From a Philosophical & Psychological Perspective.Natasza Szutta - 2020 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 23 (2):325-339.
    Virtue ethics is currently one of the most widely known ethical theories. According to it, to act morally well, one needs to perfect one’s moral character by acquiring virtues. Among various virtues, we can distinguish the group of so-called virtues of will power to which, among others, belong self-control, decisiveness, patience, etc. As they are necessary for the effectiveness of human actions, they are also called executive virtues. It is doubtful, however, if they deserve the proper name of virtues because (...)
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  • A Fundamental Ethical Approach to Nursing: Some Proposals for Ethics Education.Chris Gastmans - 2002 - Nursing Ethics 9 (5):494-507.
    The purpose of this article is to explore a fundamental ethical approach to nursing and to suggest some proposals, based on this approach, for nursing ethics education. The major point is that the kind of nursing ethics education that is given reflects the theory that is held of nursing. Three components of a fundamental ethical view on nursing are analysed more deeply: (1) nursing considered as moral practice; (2) the intersubjective character of nursing; and (3) moral perception. It is argued (...)
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  • The Eudaimonian Question: Virtue, Ethics, Neuroscience and Higher Education.Raymond Aaron Younis - 2014 - Education and Philosophies of Engagement.
    Many philosophies of engagement build upon pedagogical, metaphysical, epistemological and ethical frameworks, particularly Virtue Ethics frameworks. However, a glance at the literature suggests that there are many debates about the nature, meaning, value and application of such things. In this paper, I will look at some recent empirical work (particularly in neuroscience) on virtues. I will argue that not only do such (empirical) studies enrich and deepen our understanding of virtues and indeed of virtue ethics; when combined with a reinterpretation (...)
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  • Recent Work in Applied Virtue Ethics.Guy Axtell & Philip Olson - 2012 - American Philosophical Quarterly 49 (3):183-204.
    The use of the term "applied ethics" to denote a particular field of moral inquiry (distinct from but related to both normative ethics and meta-ethics) is a relatively new phenomenon. The individuation of applied ethics as a special division of moral investigation gathered momentum in the 1970s and 1980s, largely as a response to early twentieth- century moral philosophy's overwhelming concentration on moral semantics and its apparent inattention to practical moral problems that arose in the wake of significant social and (...)
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  • Searching for Character and the Role of Schools.Joan F. Goodman - 2018 - Ethics and Education 14 (1):15-35.
    ABSTRACTDespite a resurgence of interest in character education, just what ‘character’ means is contested. Two strands, while overlapping, diverge on several questions: Is character centrally about moral qualities or more inclusive? Does it consist of one or multiple traits? Does it regard virtue as independently or instrumentally good? Is character a set of dispositions or behaviors? Is it a matter of reflection and reason or habits and skills? Those aligned with the first part of each dichotomy I label purists, the (...)
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  • Assessing Virtue: Measurement in Moral Education at Home and Abroad.Hanan A. Alexander - 2016 - Ethics and Education 11 (3):310-325.
    How should we assess programs dedicated to education in virtue? One influential answer draws on quantitative research designs. By measuring the inputs and processes that produce the highest levels of virtue among participants according to some reasonable criterion, in this view, we can determine which programs engender the most desired results. Although many outcomes of character education can undoubtedly be assessed in this way, taken on its own, this approach may support favorable judgments about programs that indoctrinate rather than educate, (...)
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  • New Atheism and Moral Theory.Marcus Schulzke - 2013 - Journal of Global Ethics 9 (1):1-11.
    Over the past decade, New Atheists have campaigned against the influence of religion in public life and favored a more enlightened understanding of the world ? one based on the methods and theories of the natural sciences. Although the leaders of this movement refuse to give religion, even moderate religion, any place in determining moral conduct, they offer few alternatives. Most define moral responsibility by referring to facts about human biology or natural moral intuitions, yet without adequately defending this or (...)
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  • Learning the Virtues at Work.Christopher Winch - 2010 - Ethics and Education 5 (2):173-185.
    An influential view of education is that it prepares young people for adult life, usually in the areas of civic engagement, leisure and contemplation. Employment may be a locus for learning some worthwhile skills and knowledge, but it is not itself the possible locus or one of the possible loci of a worthwhile life. This article disputes that view by drawing attention to those aspects of employment that make it potentially an aspect of a worthwhile life. The exercise and development (...)
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  • Educating Virtue as a Mastery of Language.Sophia Vasalou - 2012 - The Journal of Ethics 16 (1):67-87.
    That only those who have mastered language can be virtuous is something that may strike us as an obvious truism. It would seem to follow naturally from, indeed simply restate, a view that is far more commonly held and expressed by philosophers of the virtues, namely that only those who can reason can be virtuous properly said. My aim in this paper is to draw attention to this truism and argue its importance. In doing so, I will take the starting (...)
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  • Did the Moral Education Establishment Kill Character? An Autopsy of the Death of Character.Perry L. Glanzer - 2003 - Journal of Moral Education 32 (3):291-306.
    This essay examines James Davison Hunter's claim that the moral education establishment is responsible for the death of character. I contend that although Hunter's rhetoric about the "death of character" is distracting and his claims against the moral education establishment are overstated, moral educators must grapple with his finding that effective moral education requires a coherent moral culture with a clear conception of public and private good. I attempt to draw out the implications of Hunter's finding by comparing past Soviet (...)
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  • Authority in Educational Relationships.Jan Steutel & Ben Spiecker - 2000 - Journal of Moral Education 29 (3):323-337.
    The authority of educators in general, and the authority of the moral educator in particular, are central and pervasive themes in John Wilson's writings. This paper summarises his account of authority in educational relationships, not simply by describing the results of his analysis, but by reconstructing his views in terms of some basic distinctions between different types of authority, in particular the distinction between practical and theoretical authority, and the one between de jure and de facto authority. Next, the paper (...)
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  • Does Aristotle Believe That Habituation is Only for Children?Wouter Sanderse - 2018 - Journal of Moral Education:1-13.
  • The Contemporary Aristotelian Museum: Exploring the Museum as a Site of MacIntyre's Tradition‐Constituted Enquiry.Jenifer Booth - 2007 - Journal for Cultural Research 11 (2):141-159.
    The connection is made between the Royal Museum of Scotland and encyclopaedia, one of MacIntyre's three rival versions of moral enquiry. It is then asked how MacIntyre's other two methods, genealogy and tradition‐constituted enquiry, would function within a museum. It is proposed that the museum fulfils Haldane's criterion for tradition‐constituted enquiry in that it combines the immanence and open‐endedness of the methods of enquiry with transcendence in the objects of enquiry. The ethical judgments of the visitors constitute transcendent truth in (...)
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