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  1. Nurses' Attitudes to Euthanasia: The Influence of Empirical Studies and Methodological Concerns on Nursing Practice.Janet Holt - 2008 - Nursing Philosophy 9 (4):257-272.
    This paper introduces the controversy surrounding active voluntary euthanasia and describes the legal position on euthanasia and assisted suicide in the UK. Findings from studies of the nurses' attitudes to euthanasia from the national and international literature are reviewed. There are acknowledged difficulties in carrying out research into attitudes to euthanasia and hence the review of findings from the published studies is followed by a methodological review. This methodological review examines the research design and data collection methods used in the (...)
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  • Kious and Battin’s Dilemma Resolved: Outlaw Physician Aid-in-Dying.Charles Foster - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (10):50-51.
    Volume 19, Issue 10, October 2019, Page 50-51.
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  • Parity Arguments for ‘Physician Aid-in-Dying’ for Psychiatric Disorders: Their Structure and Limits.Scott Y. H. Kim, Chris Gastmans & Marie E. Nicolini - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (10):3-7.
    Volume 19, Issue 10, October 2019, Page 3-7.
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  • Trust Increases Euthanasia Acceptance: A Multilevel Analysis Using the European Values Study.Vanessa Köneke - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):86.
    This study tests how various kinds of trust impact attitudes toward euthanasia among the general public. The indication that trust might have an impact on euthanasia attitudes is based on the slippery slope argument, which asserts that allowing euthanasia might lead to abuses and involuntary deaths. Adopting this argument usually leads to less positive attitudes towards euthanasia. Tying in with this, it is assumed here that greater trust diminishes such slippery slope fears, and thereby increases euthanasia acceptance.
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  • ‘In a Twilight World’? Judging the Value of Life for the Minimally Conscious Patient.Richard Huxtable - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (9):565-569.
    The recent ruling from England on the case of M is one of very few worldwide to consider whether life-sustaining treatment, in the form of clinically assisted nutrition and hydration, should continue to be provided to a patient in a minimally conscious state. Formally concerned with the English law pertaining to precedent autonomy (specifically advance decision-making) and the best interests of the incapacitated patient, the judgment issued in M's case implicitly engages with three different accounts of the value of human (...)
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  • Empirical Ethics, Context-Sensitivity, and Contextualism.Albert Musschenga - 2005 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (5):467 – 490.
    In medical ethics, business ethics, and some branches of political philosophy (multi-culturalism, issues of just allocation, and equitable distribution) the literature increasingly combines insights from ethics and the social sciences. Some authors in medical ethics even speak of a new phase in the history of ethics, hailing "empirical ethics" as a logical next step in the development of practical ethics after the turn to "applied ethics." The name empirical ethics is ill-chosen because of its associations with "descriptive ethics." Unlike descriptive (...)
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  • Treatment-Resistant Major Depressive Disorder and Assisted Dying.Udo Schuklenk & Suzanne van de Vathorst - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (8):577-583.
  • The Politics of Death: On Life After the “End of History”.Paolo Palladino - 2003 - Journal for Cultural Research 7 (3):321-325.
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  • Mr Marty's Muddle: A Superficial and Selective Case for Euthanasia in Europe.J. Keown - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (1):29-33.
    In April 2004 the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe debated a report from its Social, Health and Family Affairs Committee , which questioned the Council of Europe’s opposition to legalising euthanasia. This article exposes the Report’s flaws, not least its superficiality and selectivity.
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  • Ending Life, Morality, and Meaning.Jukka Varelius - 2013 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (3):559-574.
    Opponents of voluntary euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide often maintain that the procedures ought not to be accepted because ending an innocent human life would both be morally wrong in itself and have unfortunate consequences. A gravely suffering patient can grant that ending his life would involve such harm but still insist that he would have reason to continue living only if there were something to him in his abstaining from ending his life. Though relatively rarely, the notion of meaning of (...)
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  • On Acts, Omissions and Responsibility.J. Coggon - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (8):576-579.
    This paper questions the relevance of distinguishing acts and omissions in moral argument. It responds to an article by McLachlan, published in this issue of the Journal of Medical Ethics .1 I argue that McLachlan fails to establish that there is a moral difference between active and passive euthanasia and that he instead merely asserts that the difference exists. I suggest that McLachlan’s paper relies on a false commitment to general rules that do not apply in every case. Furthermore, I (...)
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  • The Double Effect Effect.Charles Foster, Jonathan Herring, Karen Melham & Tony Hope - 2011 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (1):56-72.
    The “doctrine of double effect” has a pleasing ring to it. It is regarded by some as the cornerstone of any sound approach to end-of-life issues and by others as religious mumbo jumbo. Discussions about “the doctrine” often generate more heat than light. They are often conducted at cross-purposes and laced with footnotes from Leviticus.
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  • Ramsey on “Choosing Life” at the End of Life: Conceptual Analysis of Euthanasia and Adjudicating End-of-Life Care Options.Patrick T. Smith - 2018 - Christian Bioethics 24 (2):151-172.
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  • What People Close to Death Say About Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide: A Qualitative Study.A. Chapple, S. Ziebland, A. McPherson & A. Herxheimer - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (12):706-710.
    Objective: To explore the experiences of people with a “terminal illness”, focusing on the patients’ perspective of euthanasia and assisted suicide.Method: A qualitative study using narrative interviews was conducted throughout the UK. The views of the 18 people who discussed euthanasia and assisted suicide were explored. These were drawn from a maximum variation sample, who said that they had a “terminal” illness, malignant or non-malignant.Results: That UK law should be changed to allow assisted suicide or voluntary euthanasia was felt strongly (...)
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  • Collaborated Death: An Exploration of the Swiss Model of Assisted Suicide for Its Potential to Enhance Oversight and Demedicalize the Dying Process.Stephen J. Ziegler - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (2):318-330.
    Death, like many social problems, has become medicalized. In response to this medicalization, physician-assisted suicide has emerged as one alternative among many at the end of life. And although the practice is currently legal in the states of Oregon and Washington, opponents still argue that PAS is unethical, is inconsistent with a physician's role, and cannot be effectively regulated. In comparison, Switzerland, like Oregon, permits PAS, but unlike Oregon, non-physicians and private organizations play a significant role in assisted death. Could (...)
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  • Faith, Belief, Fundamental Rights and Delivering Health Care in a Modern NHS: An Unrealistic Aspiration? [REVIEW]Jean V. McHale - 2013 - Health Care Analysis 21 (3):224-236.
    This paper considers the way in which English law safeguards fundamental rights to respect for faith and belief in relation to the delivery of health care. It explores the implications of the Human Rights Act 1998 and the Equality Act 2010. It explores some of the challenges in attempting to reconcile fundamental rights to faith and belief and the delivery of health care, both now and in the future and whether this is a realistic aspiration in a state funded health (...)
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  • Reproductive Autonomy and Regulation: Challenges to Feminism. [REVIEW]Hazel Biggs - 2010 - Feminist Legal Studies 18 (3):299-308.
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  • Voluntary Euthanasia, Physician-Assisted Suicide, and the Right to Do Wrong.Jukka Varelius - 2013 - HEC Forum 25 (3):1-15.
    It has been argued that voluntary euthanasia (VE) and physician-assisted suicide (PAS) are morally wrong. Yet, a gravely suffering patient might insist that he has a moral right to the procedures even if they were morally wrong. There are also philosophers who maintain that an agent can have a moral right to do something that is morally wrong. In this article, I assess the view that a suffering patient can have a moral right to VE and PAS despite the moral (...)
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  • Slippery Slope Arguments.Anneli Jefferson - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (10):672-680.
    Slippery slope arguments are frequently dismissed as fallacious or weak arguments but are nevertheless commonly used in political and bioethical debates. This paper gives an overview of different variants of the argument commonly found in the literature and addresses their argumentative strength and the interrelations between them. The most common variant, the empirical slippery slope argument, predicts that if we do A, at some point the highly undesirable B will follow. I discuss both the question which factors affect likelihood of (...)
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  • No Last Resort: Pitting the Right to Die Against the Right to Medical Self-Determination.Michael Cholbi - 2015 - The Journal of Ethics 19 (2):143-157.
    Many participants in debates about the morality of assisted dying maintain that individuals may only turn to assisted dying as a ‘last resort’, i.e., that a patient ought to be eligible for assisted dying only after she has exhausted certain treatment or care options. Here I argue that this last resort condition is unjustified, that it is in fact wrong to require patients to exhaust a prescribed slate of treatment or care options before being eligible for assisted dying. The last (...)
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  • “Underground Euthanasia” and the Harm Minimization Debate.Roger S. Magnusson - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (3):486-495.
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  • “Underground Euthanasia” and the Harm Minimization Debate.Roger S. Magnusson - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (3):486-495.
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  • The Empirical Slippery Slope From Voluntary to Non-Voluntary Euthanasia.Penney Lewis - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (1):197-210.
    This article examines the evidence for the empirical argument that there is a slippery slope between the legalization of voluntary and non-voluntary euthanasia. The main source of evidence in relation to this argument comes from the Netherlands. The argument is only effective against legalization if it is legalization which causes the slippery slope. Moreover, it is only effective if it is used comparatively-to show that the slope is more slippery in jurisdictions which have legalized voluntary euthanasia than it is in (...)
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  • The Empirical Slippery Slope From Voluntary to Non-Voluntary Euthanasia.Penney Lewis - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (1):197-210.
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  • Collaborated Death: An Exploration of the Swiss Model of Assisted Suicide for Its Potential to Enhance Oversight and Demedicalize the Dying Process.Stephen J. Ziegler - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (2):318-330.
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  • Recurring Themes in the Debate About Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide. [REVIEW]Theo A. Boer - 2007 - Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (3):527 - 555.
    During the past four decades, the Netherlands played a leading role in the debate about euthanasia and assisted suicide. Despite the claim that other countries would soon follow the Dutch legalization of euthanasia, only Belgium and the American state of Oregon did. In many countries, intense discussions took place. This article discusses some major contributions to the discussion about euthanasia and assisted suicide as written by Nigel Biggar (2004), Arthur J. Dyck (2002), Neil M. Gorsuch (2006), and John Keown (2002). (...)
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  • Whatever You Want? Beyond the Patient in Medical Law.Richard Huxtable - 2008 - Health Care Analysis 16 (3):288-301.
    Simon Woods proposes that we ought to re-orientate clinical decisions at the end of life back towards the patient, so as to honour his or her account of their “global” interests. Woods condemns the current medico-legal approach for remaining too closely tethered to the views of doctors. In this response, I trace the story of Mrs Kelly Taylor, who sought to be sedated and have life-sustaining treatment withdrawn, and I do so in order to show not only why Woods is (...)
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