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  1. Erroneous Gambling-Related Beliefs Emerge From Broader Beliefs During Problem-Solving: A Critical Review and Classification Scheme.Anastasia Ejova & Keis Ohtsuka - 2019 - Thinking and Reasoning 26 (2):159-187.
    Erroneous gambling-related beliefs can be defined as beliefs that imply a failure to recognise how commercial gambling activities are designed to generate a guaranteed loss to players. In t...
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  • The Epistemology of Geometry I: The Problem of Exactness.Anne Newstead & Franklin James - 2010 - Proceedings of the Australasian Society for Cognitive Science 2009.
    We show how an epistemology informed by cognitive science promises to shed light on an ancient problem in the philosophy of mathematics: the problem of exactness. The problem of exactness arises because geometrical knowledge is thought to concern perfect geometrical forms, whereas the embodiment of such forms in the natural world may be imperfect. There thus arises an apparent mismatch between mathematical concepts and physical reality. We propose that the problem can be solved by emphasizing the ways in which the (...)
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  • Understanding Repeated Simple Choices.Iddo Gal - 1996 - Thinking and Reasoning 2 (1):81 – 98.
    This study examined students' reasoning about simple repeated choices. Each choice involved ''betting'' on two events, differing in probability. We asked subjects to generate or evaluate alternative strategies such as betting on the most likely event on every trial, betting on it on almost every trial, or employing a ''probability matching'' strategy. Almost half of the college students did not generate or rank strategies according to their expected value, but few subjects preferred a strategy of strict probability matching. High-school students (...)
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  • Explaining the Gambler's Fallacy: Testing a Gestalt Explanation Versus the “Law of Small Numbers”.Christopher J. R. Roney & Natalie Sansone - 2015 - Thinking and Reasoning 21 (2):193-205.
    The present study tests a gestalt explanation for the gambler's fallacy which posits that runs in random events will be expected to reverse only when the run is open or ongoing. This is contrasted with the law of small numbers explanation suggesting that people expect random outcomes to balance out generally. Sixty-one university students placed hypothetical guesses and bets on a series of coin tosses. Either heads or tails were dominant . In a closed run condition the run ended prior (...)
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