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Ian James Kidd & Havi Carel (2014). Epistemic Injustice in Healthcare: A Philosophical Analysis.

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  1.  16
    Epistemic Injustice in Mathematics.Colin Jakob Rittberg, Fenner Stanley Tanswell & Jean Paul Van Bendegem - forthcoming - Synthese:1-30.
    We investigate how epistemic injustice can manifest itself in mathematical practices. We do this as both a social epistemological and virtue-theoretic investigation of mathematical practices. We delineate the concept both positively – we show that a certain type of folk theorem can be a source of epistemic injustice in mathematics – and negatively by exploring cases where the obstacles to participation in a mathematical practice do not amount to epistemic injustice. Having explored what epistemic injustice in mathematics can amount to, (...)
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  2. The Voices Missing From the Autonomy Discourse.Julia D. Gibson - 2019 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 12 (1):77-98.
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  3.  7
    Illness and Disease: An Empirical-Ethical Viewpoint.Anna-Henrikje Seidlein & Sabine Salloch - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):5.
    The concepts of disease, illness and sickness capture fundamentally different aspects of phenomena related to human ailments and healthcare. The philosophy and theory of medicine are making manifold efforts to capture the essence and normative implications of these concepts. In parallel, socio-empirical studies on patients’ understanding of their situation have yielded a comprehensive body of knowledge regarding subjective perspectives on health-related statuses. Although both scientific fields provide varied valuable insights, they have not been strongly linked to each other. Therefore, the (...)
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  4.  1
    Are ME/CFS Patient Organizations “Militant”?Charlotte Blease & Keith J. Geraghty - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (3):393-401.
    Myalgic encephalomyelitis or chronic fatigue syndrome is a contested illness category. This paper investigates the common claim that patients with ME/CFS—and by extension, ME/CFS patient organizations —exhibit “militant” social and political tendencies. The paper opens with a history of the protracted scientific disagreement over ME/CFS. We observe that ME/CFS POs, medical doctors, and medical researchers exhibit clear differences in opinion over how to conceptualize this illness. However, we identify a common trope in the discourse over ME/CFS: the claim of “militant” (...)
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  5.  6
    The Seeing Place: Talking Theatre and Medicine.Deborah Bowman & Joanna Bowman - 2018 - Arts and Humanities in Higher Education 17 (1):166-181.
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  6.  3
    Facilitating a Dedicated Focus on the Human Dimensions of Care in Practice Settings: Development of a New Humanised Care Assessment Tool to Sensitise Care.Kathleen T. Galvin, Claire Sloan, Fiona Cowdell, Caroline Ellis-Hill, Carole Pound, Roger Watson, Steven Ersser & Sheila Brooks - 2018 - Nursing Inquiry 25 (3):e12235.
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  7.  45
    Healthcare Practice, Epistemic Injustice, and Naturalism.Ian James Kidd & Havi Carel - 2018 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 84:1-23.
    Ill persons suffer from a variety of epistemically-inflected harms and wrongs. Many of these are interpretable as specific forms of what we dub pathocentric epistemic injustices, these being ones that target and track ill persons. We sketch the general forms of pathocentric testimonial and hermeneutical injustice, each of which are pervasive within the experiences of ill persons during their encounters in healthcare contexts and the social world. What’s epistemically unjust might not be only agents, communities and institutions, but the theoretical (...)
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  8.  37
    Vulnerability of Individuals With Mental Disorders to Epistemic Injustice in Both Clinical and Social Domains.Rena Kurs & Alexander Grinshpoon - 2018 - Ethics and Behavior 28 (4):336-346.
    Many individuals who have mental disorders often report negative experiences of a distinctively epistemic sort, such as not being listened to, not being taken seriously, or not being considered credible because of their psychiatric conditions. In an attempt to articulate and interpret these reports we present Fricker’s concepts of epistemic injustice and then focus on testimonial injustice and hermeneutic injustice as it applies to individuals with mental disorders. The clinical impact of these concepts on quality of care is discussed. Within (...)
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  9.  1
    “She Doesn't Want to Go to Hospital. That's One Thing She Hates”: Collective Performativity in Avoidable Nursing Home to Hospital Transfers.Petra Mäkelä - 2018 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 24 (5):1041-1048.
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  10.  3
    Why Do Medical Professional Regulators Dismiss Most Complaints From Members of the Public? Regulatory Illiteracy, Epistemic Injustice, and Symbolic Power.Orla O’Donovan & Deirdre Madden - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (3):469-478.
    Drawing on an analysis of complaint files that we conducted for the Irish Medical Council, this paper offers three possible explanations for the gap between the ubiquity of official commitments to taking patients’ complaints seriously and medical professional regulators’ dismissal—as not warranting an inquiry—of the vast majority of complaints submitted by members of the public. One explanation points to the “regulatory illiteracy” of many complainants, where the remit and threshold of seriousness of regulators is poorly understood by the general public. (...)
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  11.  8
    Disabled Bodies and Norms of Flourishing in the Human Engineering Debate.Tom Sparrow - 2018 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 11 (2):36-62.
    The debate over human genetic engineering and enhancement has evolved to the point where dismissive critics have yielded some ground to proponents of engineering programs and their vision of our posthuman future. This is not to say that either human engineering programs or posthumanism has become mainstream but that we have reached a point in history where it is not genetic engineering that conjures dystopian futures in our moral imaginations but the absence of human genetic enhancement. As Ingmar Persson and (...)
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  12.  2
    Before Narrative: Episodic Reading and Representations of Chronic Pain.Sara Wasson - 2018 - Medical Humanities 44 (2):106-112.
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  13.  9
    Some Thoughts on Phenomenology and Medicine.Miguel Kottow - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (3):405-412.
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  14.  72
    Learning to Listen: Epistemic Injustice and the Child.Michael D. Burroughs & Deborah Tollefsen - 2016 - Episteme 13 (3):359-377.
    In Epistemic Injustice Miranda Fricker argues that there is a distinctively epistemic type of injustice in which someone is wronged specifically in his or her capacity as a knower. Fricker's examples of identity-prejudicial credibility deficit primarily involve gender, race, and class, in which individuals are given less credibility due to prejudicial stereotypes. We argue that children, as a class, are also subject to testimonial injustice and receive less epistemic credibility than they deserve. To illustrate the prevalence of testimonial injustice against (...)
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  15.  31
    Testimonial Injustice Without Prejudice: Considering Cases of Cognitive or Psychological Impairment.Yi Li - 2016 - Journal of Social Philosophy 47 (4):457-469.
  16.  7
    The Phenomenology of Shame in the Clinical Encounter.Luna Dolezal - 2015 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 18 (4):567-576.
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  17.  20
    Medicalization and Epistemic Injustice.Alistair Wardrope - 2015 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 18 (3):341-352.