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  1. The Impact of Proximity on Consumer Fair Trade Engagement and Purchasing Behavior: The Moderating Role of Empathic Concern and Hypocrisy.Alvina Gillani, Smirti Kutaula, Leonidas C. Leonidou & Paul Christodoulides - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-21.
    The article reports the findings of an empirical study among consumers, regarding the impact of physical, social, and psychological proximity on their engagement to the fair trade idea and purchasing behavior. Based on a random sample of 211 British and 112 Indian consumers and using structural equation modeling, it was found that high levels of physical, social, and psychological proximity leads to high consumer fair trade engagement. Moreover, consumer fair trade engagement was confirmed to have a positive impact on fair (...)
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  • Fair Trade and the Fetishization of Levinasian Ethics.Juan Ignacio Staricco - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 138 (1):1-16.
    The certification-based Fair Trade initiative has been steadily growing during the last two decades. While many scholars have analyzed its main characteristics and developments, only a few have assessed it against a concept of justice. And those exceptional cases have only focused on distributive justice, proving unable to grasp the important ethical elements that Fair Trade integrates in its project. In reaction to this, this article intends to critically examine what the Fair Trade movement proposes to be ‘fair’ by resorting (...)
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  • How Does the Perceived Ethicality of Corporate Services Brands Influence Loyalty and Positive Word-of-Mouth? Analyzing the Roles of Empathy, Affective Commitment, and Perceived Quality.Stefan Markovic, Oriol Iglesias, Jatinder Jit Singh & Vicenta Sierra - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (4):721-740.
    In the past few decades, a growth in ethical consumerism has led brands to increasingly develop conscientiousness and depict ethical image at a corporate level. However, most of the research studying business ethics in the field of corporate brand management is either conceptual or has been empirically conducted in relation to goods/products contexts. This is surprising because corporate brands are more relevant in services contexts, because of the distinct nature of services and the key role that employees have in the (...)
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  • The Presence of Ethics Codes and Employees’ Internal Locus of Control, Social Aversion/Malevolence, and Ethical Judgment of Incivility: A Study of Smaller Organizations.Sean R. Valentine, Sheila K. Hanson & Gary M. Fleischman - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-18.
    Workplace incivility is a current challenge in organizations, including smaller firms, as is the development of programs that enhance employees’ treatment of coworkers and ethical decision making. Ethics programs in particular might attenuate tendencies toward interpersonal misconduct, which can harm ethical reasoning. Consequently, this study evaluated the relationships among the presence of ethics codes and employees’ locus of control, social aversion/malevolence, and ethical judgments of incivility using information secured from a sample of businesspersons employed in smaller organizations. Results indicated that (...)
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  • Faith and Fair Trade: The Moderating Role of Contextual Religious Salience.Rommel O. Salvador, Altaf Merchant & Elizabeth A. Alexander - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 121 (3):353-371.
  • Investigating the Types of Value and Cost of Green Brands: Proposition of a Conceptual Framework. [REVIEW]Erifili Papista & Athanasios Krystallis - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 115 (1):75-92.
    This conceptual article applies the customer value (CV) concept in the context of green marketing aiming to provide insights on the factors that motivate and/or hinder the development of consumer–green brand relationships. The article draws upon existing literature on the streams of CV, relationship marketing and environmental behaviour and synthesises relevant findings to propose an integrated conceptual framework entailing all identified types of value and cost, psychographic characteristics, as well as dimensions of relationship quality (RQ) and loyalty. Furthermore, it addresses (...)
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  • Ethical Consumption and New Business Models in the Food Industry. Evidence From the Eataly Case.Roberta Sebastiani, Francesca Montagnini & Daniele Dalli - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 114 (3):473-488.
    Individual and collective ethical stances regarding ethical consumption and related outcomes are usually seen as both a form of concern about extant market offerings and as opportunities to develop new offerings. In this sense, demand and supply are traditionally portrayed as interacting dialectically on the basis of extant business models. In general, this perspective implicitly assumes the juxtaposition of demand side ethical stances and supply side corporate initiatives. The Eataly story describes, however, a different approach to market transformation; in this (...)
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  • Is There a “Fair” in Fair-Trade? Social Dominance Orientation Influences Perceptions of and Preferences for Fair-Trade Products.Jennifer Landa, Stacey Finkelstein & Kimberly Rios - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (1):171-180.
    In recent years, there has been a surge in popularity of the fair-trade industry, which seeks to improve trading conditions and to promote the rights of marginalized workers. Although research suggests that fair-trade products are perceived as promoting social and economic responsibility, some individuals—namely, those who seek to maintain existing group inequalities or those induced to think inequality is a good thing—may not share this perception. Across three studies, we found that SDO relates negatively to fair-trade consumption, and this relationship (...)
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  • Fairtrade Towns as Unconventional Networks of Ethical Activism.Ken Peattie & Anthony Samuel - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 153 (1):265-282.
    The growing availability and consumption of Fairtrade products is recognised as one of the most widespread ethically inspired market developments, and as an example of activist-driven change within the wider marketing system. The Fairtrade Towns movement, now operating in over 1700 towns and cities globally, represents a comparatively recent extension of Fairtrade marketing driven by local activists seeking to promote positive change in production and consumption systems. This paper briefly explores the conventional framing of the role that ethically related activism (...)
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  • Can “Real” Men Consume Ethically? How Ethical Consumption Leads to Unintended Observer Inference.Jingzhi Shang & John Peloza - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 139 (1):129-145.
    Consumers often intend to create a socially responsible identity by consuming ethically. Observers, however, do not limit their inferences to the specific identity consumers intend to project. To illustrate, we examine how observers make inferences about consumers on the basis of their ethical consumption. Across four studies we find that, in addition to being viewed as ethical, consumers are viewed as less masculine and more feminine when they consume ethical products. We also identify two boundary conditions to this effect, including (...)
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  • Research on Fair Trade Consumption—A Review.Veronika A. Andorfer & Ulf Liebe - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 106 (4):415-435.
    An overview and assessment of the current state of research on individual consumption of Fair Trade (FT) products is given on the basis of 51 journal publications. Arranging this field of ethical consumption research according to key research objectives, theoretical approaches, methods, and study population, the review suggests that most studies apply social psychological approaches focusing mainly on consumer attitudes. Fewer studies draw on economic approaches focusing on consumers’ willingness to pay ethical premia for FT products or sociological approaches relying (...)
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