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  1. Ethical Issues in Intraoperative Neuroscience Research: Assessing Subjects’ Recall of Informed Consent and Motivations for Participation.Anna Wexler, Rebekah J. Choi, Ashwin G. Ramayya, Nikhil Sharma, Brendan J. McShane, Love Y. Buch, Melanie P. Donley-Fletcher, Joshua I. Gold, Gordon H. Baltuch, Sara Goering & Eran Klein - 2022 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 13 (1):57-66.
    BackgroundAn increasing number of studies utilize intracranial electrophysiology in human subjects to advance basic neuroscience knowledge. However, the use of neurosurgical patients as human research subjects raises important ethical considerations, particularly regarding informed consent and undue influence, as well as subjects’ motivations for participation. Yet a thorough empirical examination of these issues in a participant population has been lacking. The present study therefore aimed to empirically investigate ethical concerns regarding informed consent and voluntariness in Parkinson’s disease patients undergoing deep brain (...)
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  • Mitigating Challenges in Dual-Role Consent: Honoring Patient Preferences to Discuss Research Participation With Someone They Know.Akshay Sharma & Liza-Marie Johnson - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (4):30-32.
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  • When Is It Ethical for Physician-Investigators to Seek Consent From Their Own Patients?Stephanie R. Morain, Steven Joffe & Emily A. Largent - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (4):11-18.
    Classic statements of research ethics advise against permitting physician-investigators to obtain consent for research participation from patients with whom they have preexisting treatment relationships. Reluctance about “dual-role” consent reflects the view that distinct normative commitments govern physician–patient and investigator–participant relationships, and that blurring the research–care boundary could lead to ethical transgressions. However, several features of contemporary research demand reconsideration of the ethics of dual-role consent. Here, we examine three arguments advanced against dual-role consent: that it creates role conflict for the (...)
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  • Understanding the ‘therapeutic misconception’ from the research participant’s perspective.Scott Y. H. Kim, Raymond De Vries, Robert G. Holloway & Karl Kieburtz - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (8):522-523.
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  • Are patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis at risk of a therapeutic misconception?Scott Y. H. Kim, Renee Wilson, Raymond De Vries, Kerry A. Ryan, Robert G. Holloway & Karl Kieburtz - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (8):514-518.
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  • Informed consent for early-phase clinical trials: therapeutic misestimation, unrealistic optimism and appreciation.Jodi Halpern, David Paolo & Andrew Huang - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (6):384-387.
    Unrealistic therapeutic beliefs are very common—the majority of patient-subjects enrol in phase 1 trials seeking and expecting significant medical benefit, even though the likelihood of such benefit has historically proven very low. The high prevalence of therapeutic misestimation and unrealistic optimism in particular has stimulated debate about whether unrealistic therapeutic beliefs in early-phase clinical trials preclude adequate informed consent. We seek here to help resolve this controversy by showing that a crucial determination of when such therapeutic beliefs are ethically problematic (...)
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  • Conceptions and misconceptions of therapeutic benefit.Sarah J. L. Edwards - 2016 - Research Ethics 12 (2):64-67.
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  • Understanding people’s ‘unrealistic optimism’ about clinical research participation.Hae Lin Cho, David Gibbes Miller & Scott Y. H. Kim - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (3):172-177.
    BackgroundResearchers worry that patients in early-phase research experience unrealistic optimism about benefits and risks of participation. The standard measure of unrealistic optimism is the Comparative Risk/Benefit Assessment questionnaire, which asks people to estimate their chances of an outcome relative to others in similar situations. Such a comparative framework may not be a natural way for research participants to think about their chances.ObjectiveTo examine how people interpret questions measuring unrealistic optimism and how their interpretations are associated with their responses.MethodsUsing an early-phase (...)
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  • The Need for Guidance around Recruitment and Consent Practices in Intracranial Electrophysiology Research.Laura Yenisa Cabrera - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 12 (1):1-2.
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