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  1. How Do I See Myself?Sarah-Jayne Blakemore - 2001 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (1):4-5.
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  • Identifying Oneself with the Face of Someone Else Impairs the Egocentered Visuo-Spatial Mechanisms: A New Double Mirror Paradigm to Study Self–Other Distinction and Interaction.Bérangère Thirioux, Moritz Wehrmann, Nicolas Langbour, Nematollah Jaafari & Alain Berthoz - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • The Self and its Brain: A Critical Examination of The Face in the Mirror.Alain Morin - 2003 - Science and Consciousness Review 1.
    Where is the self located in the brain? This is a question that has intrigued philosophers and scientists for quite some time. Four centuries ago, the French philosopher René Descartes thought that the self resided in the pineal gland, a small structure centrally positioned in the lower brain.
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  • Self-Awareness and the Left Hemisphere: The Dark Side of Selectively Reviewing the Literature.Alain Morin - 2005 - Cortex 41:695-704.
  • Short Article One's Own Face is Hard to Ignore.Marie Delchambre - unknown
    One’s own face possesses two properties that make it prone to grab attention: It is a face, and, in addition, it is a self-referential stimulus. The question of whether the self-face is actually an especially attention-grabbing stimulus was addressed by using a face– name interference paradigm. We investigated whether interference from a flanking self-face on the processing of a target classmate’s name was stronger than interference from a classmate’s flanking face on the processing of one’s own name as the target. (...)
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  • Balancing the “Inner” and the “Outer” Self: Interoceptive Sensitivity Modulates Self–Other Boundaries.Ana Tajadura-Jiménez & Manos Tsakiris - 2014 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 143 (2):736-744.
  • Looking at My Own Face: Visual Processing Strategies in Self–Other Face Recognition.Anya Chakraborty & Bhismadev Chakrabarti - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • Functional Imaging of 'Theory of Mind'.Helen L. Gallagher & Christopher D. Frith - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (2):77-83.
  • Cortical Midline Structures and the Self.Georg Northoff & Felix Bermpohl - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (3):102-107.
  • What is Self-Specific? Theoretical Investigation and Critical Review of Neuroimaging Results.Dorothée Legrand & Perrine Ruby - 2009 - Psychological Review 116 (1):252-282.
  • Understanding the Imitation Deficit in Autism May Lead to a More Specific Model of Autism as an Empathy Disorder.Tony Charman - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):29-30.
    Preston & de Waal are understandably cautious in applying their model to autism. They emphasise multiple cognitive impairments in autism, including prefrontal-executive, cerebellar-attention, and amygdala-emotion recognition deficits. Further empirical examination of imitation ability in autism may reveal deficits in the neural and cognitive basis of perception-action mapping that have a specific relation to the empathic deficit.
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  • Self-Processing and the Default Mode Network: Interactions with the Mirror Neuron System.Istvan Molnar-Szakacs & Lucina Q. Uddin - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  • Let’s Face It. A Review of Keenan, Gallup, & Falk’s Book “The Face in the Mirror”.Alain Morin - 2003 - Evolutionary Psychology 1:161-171.
    A review of The Face in the Mirror: The Search for the Origins of Consciousness by Julian Paul Keenan with Gordon C. Gallup Jr. and Dean Falk. Ecco, New York, 2003. ISBN 006001279X.
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  • Neural Correlates of Outcome of the Psychotherapy Compared to Antidepressant Therapy in Anxiety and Depression Disorders: A Meta-Analysis.Navkiran Kalsi, Daniela Altavilla, Renata Tambelli, Paola Aceto, Cristina Trentini, Chiara Di Giorgio & Carlo Lai - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  • Awareness of the Functioning of One's Own Limbs Mediated by the Insular Cortex?Hans-Otto Karnath, Bernhard Baier & Thomas Nägele - 2005 - Journal of Neuroscience 25 (31):7134-7138.
  • The Neural Correlates of Visual Self-Recognition.Christel Devue & Serge Brédart - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (1):40-51.
    This paper presents a review of studies that were aimed at determining which brain regions are recruited during visual self-recognition, with a particular focus on self-face recognition. A complex bilateral network, involving frontal, parietal and occipital areas, appears to be associated with self-face recognition, with a particularly high implication of the right hemisphere. Results indicate that it remains difficult to determine which specific cognitive operation is reflected by each recruited brain area, in part due to the variability of used control (...)
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  • Self-Consciousness, Self-Agency, and Schizophrenia.Tilo T. J. Kircher & Dirk T. Leube - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):656-669.
    Empirical approaches on topics such as consciousness, self-awareness, or introspective perspective, need a conceptual framework so that the emerging, still unconnected findings can be integrated and put into perspective. We introduce a model of self-consciousness derived from phenomenology, philosophy, the cognitive, and neurosciences. We will then give an overview of research data on one particular aspect of our model, self-agency, trying to link findings from cognitive psychology and neuroscience. Finally, we will expand on pathological aspects of self-agency, and in particular (...)
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  • Action Identity: Evidence From Self-Recognition, Prediction, and Coordination.Günther Knoblich & Rüdiger Flach - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):620-632.
    Prior research suggests that the action system is responsible for creating an immediate sense of self by determining whether certain sensations and perceptions are the result of one's own actions. In addition, it is assumed that declarative, episodic, or autobiographical memories create a temporally extended sense of self or some form of identity. In the present article, we review recent evidence suggesting that action (procedural) knowledge also forms part of a person's identity, an action identity, so to speak. Experiments that (...)
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  • Self-Specific Priming Effect.Alessia Pannese & Joy Hirsch - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (4):962-968.
    Priority of the “self” is thought to be evolutionarily advantageous. However, evidence for this priority has been sparse. In this study, subjects performed a gender categorization task on self- and non-self target faces preceded by either congruent or incongruent periliminal or subliminal primes. We found that subliminal primes induced a priming effect only on self target faces. This discovery of a self-specific priming effect suggests that functional specificity for faces may include timing as well as spatial adaptations.
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  • The Processing of Auditory and Visual Recognition of Self-Stimuli.Susan M. Hughes & Shevon E. Nicholson - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (4):1124-1134.
    This study examined self-recognition processing in both the auditory and visual modalities by determining how comparable hearing a recording of one’s own voice was to seeing photograph of one’s own face. We also investigated whether the simultaneous presentation of auditory and visual self-stimuli would either facilitate or inhibit self-identification. Ninety-one participants completed reaction-time tasks of self-recognition when presented with their own faces, own voices, and combinations of the two. Reaction time and errors made when responding with both the right and (...)
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  • Split-Brain Reveals Separate but Equal Self-Recognition in the Two Cerebral Hemispheres.Lucina Q. Uddin, Jan Rayman & Eran Zaidel - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14 (3):633-640.
    To assess the ability of the disconnected cerebral hemispheres to recognize images of the self, a split-brain patient was tested using morphed self-face images presented to one visual hemifield at a time while making “self/other” judgments. The performance of the right and left hemispheres of this patient as assessed by a signal detection method was not significantly different, though a measure of bias did reveal hemispheric differences. The right and left hemispheres of this patient independently and equally possessed the ability (...)
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  • Self-Memory Biases in Explicit and Incidental Encoding of Trait Adjectives.David J. Turk, Sheila J. Cunningham & C. Neil Macrae - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):1040-1045.
    An extensive literature has demonstrated that encoding information in a self-referential manner enhances subsequent memory performance. This ‘self-reference effect’ is generally elicited in paradigms that require participants to evaluate the self-descriptiveness of personality characteristics. Extending work of this kind, the current research explored the possibility that explicit evaluative processing is not a necessary precondition for the emergence of this effect. Rather, responses to self cues may enhance item encoding even in the absence of explicit evaluative instructions. We explored this hypothesis (...)
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  • Self Perception and Facial Emotion Perception of Others in Anorexia Nervosa.Andrea Phillipou, Larry A. Abel, David J. Castle, Matthew E. Hughes, Caroline Gurvich, Richard G. Nibbs & Susan L. Rossell - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • Dividing the Self: Distinct Neural Substrates of Task-Based and Automatic Self-Prioritization After Brain Damage.Jie Sui, Magdalena Chechlacz & Glyn W. Humphreys - 2012 - Cognition 122 (2):150-162.
  • Self-Recognition: Body and Action.Günther Knoblich - 2002 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (11):447-449.
  • The Rubber Hand Illusion in a Mirror.Marco Bertamini, Nausicaa Berselli, Carole Bode, Rebecca Lawson & Li Ting Wong - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1108-1119.
    In the rubber hand illusion one’s hand is hidden, and a fake hand is visible. We explored the situation in which visual information was available indirectly in a mirror. In the mirror condition, compared to the standard condition , we found no reduction of the RHI following synchronised stimulation, as measured by crossmanual pointing and by a questionnaire. We replicated the finding with a smaller mirror that prevented visibility of the face. The RHI was eliminated when a wooden block replaced (...)
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  • Where in the Brain is the Self?Todd E. Feinberg & Julian Paul Keenan - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14 (4):671-678.
    Localizing the self in the brain has been the goal of consciousness research for centuries. Recently, there has been an increase in attention to the localization of the self. Here we present data from patients suffering from a loss of self in an attempt to understand the neural correlates of consciousness. Focusing on delusional misidentification syndrome , we find that frontal regions, as well as the right hemisphere appear to play a significant role in DMS and DMS related disorders. These (...)
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  • Self-Consciousness in Non-Communicative Patients.Steven Laureys, Fabien Perrin & Serge Brédart - 2007 - Consciousness and Cognition 16 (3):722-741.
    The clinical and para-clinical examination of residual self-consciousness in non-communicative severely brain damaged patients remains exceptionally challenging. Passive presentation of the patient’s own name and own face are known to be effective attention-grabbing stimuli when clinically assessing consciousness at the patient’s bedside. Event-related potential and functional neuroimaging studies using such self-referential stimuli are currently being used to disentangle the cognitive hierarchy of self-processing. We here review neuropsychological, neuropathological, electrophysiological and neuroimaging studies using the own name and own face paradigm obtained (...)
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