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  1. Developments in the Debate on Nanoethics: Traditional Approaches and the Need for New Kinds of Analysis. [REVIEW]Arianna Ferrari - 2010 - NanoEthics 4 (1):27-52.
    This paper aims to review different discourses within the emerging field of ethical reflection on nanotechnology. I will start by analysing the early stages of this debate, showing how it has been focused on searching for legitimacy for this sphere of moral inquiry. I will then characterise an ethical approach, common to many authors, which frames ethical issues in terms of risks and benefits. This approach identifies normative issues where there are conflicts of interest or where challenges to the fundamental (...)
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  • Disciplining Nano.Ana Viseu - 2008 - Spontaneous Generations 2 (1):122.
    Monsters, argues Haraway, are sites of confusion and hybridity, entities that defy easy categorization and, as a consequence, hold promise, pleasure, and peril. Haraway adds that monsters are also not accidental or innocent: their creation requires sustained work, their existence has effects. Thus, to understand how Frankenstein came to be in Lilliput, the theme of this special edition, it is crucial to examine how monsters are constructed and how they do things in the world.In this article I propose to start, (...)
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  • Perceptions of Nano Ethics Among Practitioners in a Developing Country: A Case of India. [REVIEW]Debasmita Patra, E. Haribabu & Katherine A. McComas - 2010 - NanoEthics 4 (1):67-75.
    Many developing countries have allocated significant amounts of funding for nanoscience and nanotechnology research, yet compared to developed countries, there has been little study, discussion, or debate over social and ethical issues. Using in-depth interviews, this study focuses on the perceptions of practitioners, that is, scientists and engineers, in one developing country: India. The disciplinary background, departmental affiliation, types of institutions, age, and sex of the practitioners varied but did not appear to affect their responses. The results show that 95% (...)
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  • Representations of Nanotechnology in Norwegian Newspapers — Implications for Public Participation.Kamilla Lein Kjølberg - 2009 - NanoEthics 3 (1):61-72.
    Public participation is a prominent issue in the nanoethics literature. This paper analyses the emerging awareness of nanoscience and nanotechnology (nano S&T) in the Norwegian public sphere, as evidenced by newspaper coverage. In particular, attention is on representations of nano S&T and their relation to public participation. Three dominant representations are found; nano S&T as positive, nano S&T as important for the future and nano S&T as under control. It is argued that the prominence of these representations is unfortunate because (...)
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  • Nation-Building and the Governance of Emerging Technologies: The Case of Nanotechnology in India.Koen Beumer - 2019 - NanoEthics 13 (1):5-19.
    Emerging technologies like nanotechnologies are governed in different ways around the world. This article draws attention to an important element that can help to explain the emergence of this diversity in governance practices: the role of nanotechnology in nation-building. By investigating the relation between nanotechnology and the nation in India, the article demonstrates that various particularities of the Indian governance of nanotechnology can be explained by the relation between science, technology, and nation-building. The article discusses four instances in which the (...)
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  • Framing the Discussion: Nanotechnology and the Social Construction of Technology--What STS Scholars Are Saying.Stephen H. Cutcliffe, Christine M. Pense & Michael Zvalaren - 2012 - NanoEthics 6 (2):81-99.
    The emergence of nanotechnology, with all its promises of economic, social, and medical benefits, along with dire predictions of environmental, health, and safety threats, has occasioned an active debate in the Science and Technology Studies field, in which we have seen five distinct conversations that frame the discussion. The topical threads include ethics, regulation, opportunities and threats including utopian/dystopian visions of the future, public perception, public participation. These conversational distinctions are not absolutes with firm borders as they clearly overlap at (...)
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  • Public Involvement and Narrative Fallacies of Nanotechnologies.Erik Thorstensen - 2014 - NanoEthics 8 (3):227-240.
    This paper analyzes a European research project called ‘Deepening Ethical Engagement and Participation in Emerging Nanotechnologies’ with the abbreviation DEEPEN. The DEEPEN’s findings and conclusions on the narratives, public understandings and the lay ethics of nanotechnologies are examined in a critical manner. Through a criticism of the theoretical framings of what constitutes a narrative and the application of a different theoretical framing of narratives, the paper argues that the findings and conclusion of the DEEPEN should be approached with caution as (...)
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  • Conversations About Responsible Nanoresearch.Kamilla Lein Kjølberg & Roger Strand - 2011 - NanoEthics 5 (1):99-113.
    There is currently a strong focus on responsible research in relation to the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology. This study presents a series of conversations with nanoresearchers, with the ‘European Commission recommendation on a code of conduct for responsible nanosciences and nanotechnologies research’ (EC-CoC) as its point of departure. Six types of reactions to the document are developed, illustrating the diversity existing within the scientific community in responses towards this kind of new approaches to governance. Three broad notions of responsible (...)
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  • Narratives of Mastery and Resistance: Lay Ethics of Nanotechnology. [REVIEW]Phil Macnaghten - 2010 - NanoEthics 4 (2):141-151.
    This paper contributes towards a lay ethics of nanotechnology through an analysis of talk from focus groups designed to examine how laypeople grapple with the meaning of a technology ‘in-the-making’. We describe the content of lay ethical concerns before suggesting that this content can be understood as being structured by five archetypal narratives which underpin talk. These we term: ‘the rich get richer and the poor get poorer’; ‘kept in the dark’; ‘opening Pandora’s box’; ‘messing with nature’; and ‘be careful (...)
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  • A Definition Framework for the Terms Nanomaterial and Nanoparticle.Max Boholm & Rickard Arvidsson - 2016 - NanoEthics 10 (1):25-40.
    Scientific writings and policy documents define the terms nanomaterial and nanoparticle in various ways. This variation is considered problematic because the absence of a shared definition is understood as potentially hindering nanomaterial knowledge production and regulation. Another view is that the existence of a shared definition may itself cause problems, as rigid definitions arguably exclude important aspects of the studied phenomena. The aim of this paper is to inform this state of disagreement by providing analytical concepts for a systematic understanding (...)
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  • Development and Pilot Testing of an Evidence-Based Training Module for Integrating Social and Ethical Implications Into the Lab.Lee Ann Kahlor, Xiaoshan Li & Jacy Jones - 2019 - NanoEthics 13 (1):37-52.
    In this project, we explore perceptions of the social and ethical implications of nanotechnology among US scientists who work at the nanoscale, and develop and pilot test an online training module to foster consideration of social and ethical implications in the lab. To meet our first goal, we drew qualitative insights from open-ended survey data collected from scientists affiliated with the National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network. Our data suggest that while the survey participants responded positively to the idea that consideration of (...)
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  • God Nanoetikk – God Nanoteknologiutvikling.Rune Nydal & Roger Strand - 2008 - Etikk I Praksis - Nordic Journal of Applied Ethics 2 (2).
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  • Do New Ethical Issues Arise at Each Stage of Nanotechnological Development?Céline Kermisch - 2012 - NanoEthics 6 (1):29-37.
    The literature concerning ethical issues associated with nanotechnologies has become prolific. However, it has been claimed that ethical problems are only at stake with rather sophisticated nanotechnologies such as active nanostructures, integrated nanosystems and heterogeneous molecular nanosystems, whereas more basic nanotechnologies such as passive nanostructures mainly pose technical difficulties. In this paper I argue that fundamental ethical issues are already at stake with this more basic kind of nanotechnologies and that ethics impacts every kind of nanotechnologies, already from the simplest (...)
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