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  1. A Crisis of Leadership: Towards an Anti‐Sovereign Ethics of Organisation.Edward Wray-Bliss - 2013 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 22 (1):86-101.
    A common reaction to crises experienced within or brought about by business is to identify a corollary ‘crisis of leadership’ and to call for better leaders. This paper supports the idea that there is a crisis of leadership – but interprets it quite differently. Specifically, I argue that the most ethically debilitating crisis is the fact that we look to leadership to solve organisational ethical ills. There is, I argue, a pressing need to conceptualise a business ethics that is not (...)
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  • Experimental Design: Ethics, Integrity and the Scientific Method.Jonathan Lewis - 2020 - In Ron Iphofen (ed.), Handbook of Research Ethics and Scientific Integrity. Cham, Switzerland: pp. 459-474.
    Experimental design is one aspect of a scientific method. A well-designed, properly conducted experiment aims to control variables in order to isolate and manipulate causal effects and thereby maximize internal validity, support causal inferences, and guarantee reliable results. Traditionally employed in the natural sciences, experimental design has become an important part of research in the social and behavioral sciences. Experimental methods are also endorsed as the most reliable guides to policy effectiveness. Through a discussion of some of the central concepts (...)
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  • The Ethics of Managerial Subjectivity.Eduardo Ibarra-Colado, Stewart R. Clegg, Carl Rhodes & Martin Kornberger - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 64 (1):45 - 55.
    This paper examines ethics in organizations in relation to the subjectivity of managers. Drawing on the work of Michel Foucault we seek to theorize ethics in terms of the meaning of being a manager who is an active ethical subject. Such a manager is so in relation to the organizational structures and norms that govern the conduct of ethics. Our approach locates ethics in the relation between individual morality and organizationally prescribed principles assumed to guide personal action. In this way (...)
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  • On the Possibility of a Paratelic Initiation of Organizational Wrongdoing.Mikko Vesa, Frank den Hond & J. Tuomas Harviainen - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 160 (1):1-15.
    In terms of reversal theory, both dominant and alternative explanations of the initiation of organizational wrongdoing assume that its perpetrators act in a telic state of mind. This leaves us with explanations of organizational wrongdoing that are insufficiently appreciative of the agent’s experience. The human mind can be creative and imaginative, too, and people can fully immerse in their activity. We suggest that the paratelic state of mind is relevant for the phenomenological understanding of the initiation of original, creative, daring (...)
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  • A Study of the Validity of the Moral Ethos Questionnaire and its Transferability to a Chinese Context.Robin S. Snell, Keith F. Taylor, Jess Wai-han Chu & Damon Drummond - 1999 - Teaching Business Ethics 3 (4):361-381.
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  • The Representation of Social Actors in Corporate Codes of Ethics. How Code Language Positions Internal Actors.Ingo Winkler - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (4):653-665.
    This article understands codes of ethics as written documents that represent social actors in specific ways through the use of language. It presents an empirical study that investigated the codes of ethics of the German Dax30 companies. The study adopted a critical discourse analysis-approach in order to reveal how the code-texts produce a particular understanding of the various internal social groups for the readers. Language is regarded as social practice that functions at creating particular understandings of individuals and groups, how (...)
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  • Questioning Corporate Codes of Ethics.Mollie Painter-Morland - 2010 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 19 (3):265-279.
    This paper argues that corporate Codes of Ethics lose their ability to further moral responsiveness because of the narrow instrumental purposes that inform their adoption and use. It draws on Jacques Derrida's reading of Emmanuel Levinas to argue that, despite the fact that all philosophical language entails a certain violence, corporate Codes of Ethics could potentially play a more meaningful role in furthering ethical questioning within corporations. The paper argues that Derrida's reading of Levinas' notion of 'the third' could precipitate (...)
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  • How Can I Become a Responsible Subject? Towards a Practice-Based Ethics of Responsiveness.Bernadette Loacker & Sara Louise Muhr - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (2):265-277.
    Approaches to business ethics can be roughly divided into two streams: ‹codes of behavior’ and ‹forms of subjectification’, with code-oriented approaches clearly dominating the field. Through an elaboration of poststructuralist approaches to moral philosophy, this paper questions the emphasis on codes of behaviour and, thus, the conceptions of the moral and responsible subject that are inherent in rule-based approaches. As a consequence of this critique, the concept of a practice-based ‹ethics of responsiveness’ in which ethics is never final but rather (...)
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  • Managerial Responsibility as Negotiated Order: A Social Construction Perspective.Loréa Baïada-Hirèche, Jean Pasquero & Jean-François Chanlat - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (S1):17-31.
    This article examines how employees form their perceptions of managerial responsibility in a concrete organizational setting. Drawing on negotiated order theory, it shows that these perceptions are the result of complex processes of social construction and negotiation, rather than the application of predetermined ethics models or norms. Employees’ perceptions appear to be unstable; they are subject to constant alterations, fluctuating with the organizational circumstances, and are likely to create considerable organizational perturbations, especially when managers make complex and ambiguous decisions. This (...)
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  • Institutional Interest in Corporate Responsibility: Portfolio Evidence and Ethical Explanation. [REVIEW]Paul Cox & Patricia Gaya Wicks - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 103 (1):143-165.
    This study examines the extent to which corporate responsibility influences the demand for shares by institutions. The study follows Bushee (Account Rev 73(3):305–333, 1998 ) in categorising institutions as dedicated or transient. The demand for shares is organised according to three factors: a long-term factor, corporate responsibility; a short-term factor, market liquidity; and a time-independent factor, portfolio theory. The rank and importance of the factors for the different types of institutional investor are analysed. For one of two types of dedicated (...)
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  • A Content Analysis of Whistleblowing Policies of Leading European Companies.Harold Hassink, Meinderd de Vries & Laury Bollen - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 75 (1):25 - 44.
    Since the introduction of the U.S. Sarbanes-Oxley Act in 2002 and several other national corporate governance codes, whistleblowing policies have been implemented in a growing number of companies. Existing research indicates that this type of governance codes has a limited direct effect on ethical or whistleblowing behaviour whereas whistleblowing policies at the corporate level seem to be more effective. Therefore, evidence on the impact of (inter)national corporate governance codes on the content of corporate whistleblowing policies is important to understand their (...)
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  • Ethical Codes of Conduct in Irish Companies: A Survey of Code Content and Enforcement Procedures.Brendan O’Dwyer & Grainne Madden - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 63 (3):217-236.
    This paper reports on an investigation of issues surrounding the use of ethical codes/codes of conduct in Irish based companies. Using a comprehensive questionnaire survey, the paper examines the incidence, content and enforcement of codes of conduct among a sample of the top 1000 companies based in Ireland. The main findings indicate that the overall usage of codes of conduct amongst indigenous Irish companies has increased significantly from 1995 to 2000. However, in line with prior research, these codes focus primarily (...)
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  • The Morality of Everyday Activities: Not the Right, But the Good Thing To Do.Daniel Nyberg - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (3):587-598.
    This article attempts to understand and develop the morality of everyday activities in organizations. Aristotle’s concept of phronesis, practical wisdom, is utilized to describe the morality of the everyday work activities at two call centres of an Australian insurance company. The ethnographic data suggests that ethical judgements at the lower level of the organization are practical rather than theoretical; emergent rather than static; ambiguous rather than clear-cut; and particular rather than universal. Ethical codes are of limited value here and it (...)
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  • Ethics as a Fabric: An Emotional Reflexive Sensemaking Process.Pauline Fatien Diochon & Jean Nizet - 2019 - Business Ethics Quarterly 29 (4):461-489.
    ABSTRACT:The ethical sensemaking approach stands as an essential alternative to the dominant rational and objectivist paradigm of ethical decision-making in organizations. From this perspective, this research explores the intrapersonal interplay of emotions and reflexivity in ethical sensemaking. We analyzed thirty-seven semi-structured interviews conducted with executive coaches sharing a critical incident about an issue they framed as ethical. Our findings show that their ethical decisions unfolded over a three-phase emotional reflexive sensemaking process, where reflexivity allowed for the management of emotions in (...)
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  • A Crisis of Leadership: Towards an Anti-Sovereign Ethics of Organisation.Edward Wray-Bliss - 2013 - Business Ethics: A European Review 22 (1):86-101.
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  • ‘The Ethics of Managerial Subjectivity’.Eduardo Ibarra-Colado, Stewart R. Clegg, Carl Rhodes & Martin Kornberger - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 64 (1):45-55.
    This paper examines ethics in organizations in relation to the subjectivity of managers. Drawing on the work of Michel Foucault we seek to theorize ethics in terms of the meaning of being a manager who is an active ethical subject. Such a manager is so in relation to the organizational structures and norms that govern the conduct of ethics. Our approach locates ethics in the relation between individual morality and organizationally prescribed principles assumed to guide personal action. In this way (...)
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  • The Relationship Between Informal Controls, Ethical Work Climates, and Organizational Performance.Sebastian Goebel & Barbara E. Weißenberger - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 141 (3):505-528.
    Due to the frequent occurrence of ethical transgressions and unethical employee behaviors, there has lately been an increasing interest in the ethical foundations of contemporary organizations. However, large-scale comprehensive analyses of organizational ethics are still comparatively limited. Our study contributes to both management control and business ethics literature by empirically examining potential antecedents as well as resulting effects of ethical work climates on organizational-level outcomes. Based on a cross-sectional survey among 295 large- and medium-sized companies, we find that more informal (...)
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  • Code of Ethics: A Stratified Vehicle for Compliance.Jennifer Adelstein & Stewart Clegg - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 138 (1):53-66.
    Ethical codes have been hailed as an explicit vehicle for achieving more sustainable and defensible organizational practice. Nonetheless, when legal compliance and corporate governance codes are conflated, codes can be used to define organizational interests ostentatiously by stipulating norms for employee ethics. Such codes have a largely cosmetic and insurance function, acting subtly and strategically to control organizational risk management and protection. In this paper, we conduct a genealogical discourse analysis of a representative code of ethics from an international corporation (...)
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  • Codes of Ethics in the Light of Fairness and Harm.Dan Munter - 2013 - Business Ethics: A European Review 22 (2):174-188.
    Nine codes of ethics from companies in the Swedish financial sector were subjected to a content analysis to determine how they address and treat employees. The codes say a great deal about employee conduct and misconduct but next to nothing about employee rights, their rightful expectations or their value to the firm. The normative analysis – echoing some of the value-based HRM literature – draws on the foundational values of respect, equality, reciprocity and care. The analysis shows that most of (...)
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  • Questioning Corporate Codes of Ethics.Mollie Painter-Morland - 2010 - Business Ethics: A European Review 19 (3):265-279.
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