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A Commentary on Plato's Meno

University of Chicago Press (1965)

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  1. Socrates’ Warning Against Misology.Thomas Miller - 2015 - Phronesis 60 (2):145-179.
    In thePhaedo, Socrates warns his listeners, discouraged by the objections of Simmias and Cebes, against becoming haters oflogoi. I argue that the ‘misologists’ are presented as a type of proto-skeptic and that Socrates in fact shows covert sympathy for their position. The difference between them is revealed by the pragmatic argument for trust in the immortality of the soul that Socrates offers near the end of the passage: the misologists reject such therapeutic uses oflogos. I conclude by assessing the relationship (...)
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  • Hidden Patency: On the Iconic Character of Human Life.B. V. Foltz - 2001 - Christian Bioethics 7 (3):317-331.
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  • Dianoia Left and Right.S. Pollard - 2013 - Philosophia Mathematica 21 (3):309-322.
    In Plato's Phaedrus, Socrates offers two speeches, the first portraying madness as mere disease, the second celebrating madness as divine inspiration. Each speech is correct, says Socrates, though neither is complete. The two kinds of madness are like the left and right sides of a living body: no account that focuses on just one half can be adequate. In a recent paper, Hugh Benson gives a left-handed speech about a psychic condition endemic among mathematicians: dianoia. Benson acknowledges that his account (...)
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  • Images as Images: Commentary on Smith.David Roochnik - 1997 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 13 (1):205-212.
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  • Commentary on Saxonhouse.Mary R. Lefkowitz - 1998 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 14 (1):130-138.
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  • Plato – by Robin Barrow.Jim Mackenzie - 2010 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (4):501-503.
  • Socrates, the Primary Question, and the Unity of Virtue.Justin C. Clark - 2015 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 45 (4):445-470.
    For Socrates, the virtues are a kind of knowledge, and the virtues form a unity. Sometimes, Socrates suggests that the virtues are all ‘one and the same’ thing. Other times, he suggests they are ‘parts of a single whole.’ I argue that the ‘what is x?’ question is sophisticated, it gives rise to two distinct kinds of investigations into virtue, a conceptual investigation into the ousia and a psychological investigation into the dunamis, Plato recognized the difference between definitional accounts of (...)
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  • Anamnesis: Platonic Doctrine or Sophistic Absurdity?William S. Cobb - 1973 - Dialogue 12 (4):604-628.
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  • Barbara Thayer‐Bacon on Knowers and the Known.Jim McKenzie - 2002 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 34 (3):301–319.
  • Variations in Philosophical Genre: The Platonic Dialogue.Dylan Brian Futter - 2015 - Metaphilosophy 46 (2):246-262.
    The primary function of the Platonic dialogue is not the communication of philosophical doctrines but the transformation of the reader's character. This article takes up the question of how, or by what means, the Platonic dialogue accomplishes its transformative goal. An answer is developed as follows. First, the style of reading associated with analytical philosophy is not transformative, on account of its hermeneutical attachment and epistemic equality in the relationship between reader and author. Secondly, the style of reading associated with (...)
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  • Contexts of Begging the Question.Jim Mackenzie - 1994 - Argumentation 8 (3):227-240.
    In this paper a dialogical account of begging the question is applied to various contexts which are not obviously dialogues: - reading prose, working through a deductive system, presenting a legal case, and thinking to oneself. The account is then compared with that in chapter eight of D. Walton'sBegging the Question (New York; Greenwood, 1991).
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