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  1. A Discussion of Kretchmar’s Elements of Competition.Richard Royce - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (2):178-191.
    Recently Kretchmar attempted to apply and to explore Husserl’s transcendental phenomenological method in relation to clarifying, in the context of sport particularly, the main features of competition. He concludes with the strong claim that competition is unintelligible unless understood in relation to the four elements of plurality, comparison, normativity, and disputation. Roughly, the idea is that competition needs to be understood as a context in which more than one competitor is involved; where competitors are compared; that comparisons are evaluations of (...)
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  • An Epistemology of Teaching.Doug Blomberg - 1999 - Philosophia Reformata 64 (1):1-14.
    When parents see their children’s problems as opportunities to build the relationship instead of as a negative, burdensome irritation, it totally changes the nature of parent-child interaction.... When a child comes to them with a problem ... their paradigm is, “Here is a great opportunity for me to really help my child and to invest in our relationship.”... [S]trong bonds of love and trust are created as children sense the value parents give to their problems and to them as individuals (...)
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  • On the Worthwhileness of Theoretical Activities.Michael Hand - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (s1):109-121.
    R.S. Peters' arguments for the worthwhileness of theoretical activities are intended to justify education per se, on the assumption that education is necessarily a matter of initiating people into theoretical activities. If we give up this assumption, we can ask whether Peters' arguments might serve instead to justify the academic curriculum over other curricular arrangements. For this they would need to show that theoretical activities are not only worthwhile but, in some relevant sense, more worthwhile than activities of other kinds. (...)
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  • Learning Our Concepts.Megan J. Laverty - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (s1):27-40.
    Richard Stanley Peters appreciates the centrality of concepts for everyday life, however, he fails to recognize their pedagogical dimension. He distinguishes concepts employed at the first-order (our ordinary language-use) from second-order conceptual clarification (conducted exclusively by academically trained philosophers). This distinction serves to elevate the discipline of philosophy at the expense of our ordinary language-use. I revisit this distinction and argue that our first-order use of concepts encompasses second-order concern. Individuals learn and teach concepts as they use them. Conceptual understanding (...)
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  • Learning Our Concepts.Megan J. Laverty - 2009 - Philosophy of Education 43 (Supplement s1):27-40.
    Richard Stanley Peters appreciates the centrality of concepts for everyday life, however, he fails to recognize their pedagogical dimension. He distinguishes concepts employed at the first-order from second-order conceptual clarification. This distinction serves to elevate the discipline of philosophy at the expense of our ordinary language-use. I revisit this distinction and argue that our first-order use of concepts encompasses second-order concern. Individuals learn and teach concepts as they use them. Conceptual understanding is an obligation that all individuals, and not just (...)
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  • The Prudential Value of Education for Autonomy.Mark Piper - 2011 - Philosophy of Education 45 (1):19-35.
    A popular justification of education for autonomy is that autonomy possession has intrinsic prudential value. Communitarians have argued, however, that although autonomy may be a core element of a well-lived life in liberal societies, it cannot claim such a prudential pedigree in traditional societies in which the conception of a good life is intimately tied to the acceptance of a pre-established worldview. In this paper I examine a recent attempt made by Ishtiyaque Haji and Stefaan Cuypers to respond to this (...)
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  • School-Based Punishment.R. J. Royce - 1984 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 18 (1):85–95.
  • Teaching Children to Ignore Alternatives is—Sometimes—Necessary: Indoctrination as a Dispensable Term.José María Ariso - forthcoming - Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-14.
    Literature on indoctrination has focused on imparting and revising beliefs, but it has hardly considered the way of teaching and acquiring certainties—in Wittgenstein’s sense. Therefore, the role played by rationality in the acquisition of our linguistic practices has been overestimated. Furthermore, analyses of the relationship between certainty and indoctrination contain major errors. In this paper, the clarification of the aforementioned issues leads me to suggest the avoidance of the term ‘indoctrination’ so as to avoid focusing on the suitability of the (...)
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  • The Ideological Reduction of Education1.R. Graham Oliver - 1998 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 30 (3):299-302.
  • Part of the Conversation: Lost Opportunities in the Reformation of Educational Administration?Stephen Crump - 1993 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 25 (2):65-78.
  • Revisiting the Task/Achievement Analysis of Teaching in Neo‐Liberal Times.James D. Marshall - 2009 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (1):79-90.
    In 1975 I published an article on Gilbert Ryle's task/achievement analysis of teaching, arguing that teaching was in Ryle's sense of the distinction a task verb. Philosophers of education were appealing to a distinction between tasks and achievements in their discussions of teaching, but they were often also appealing to Ryle's work on the analysis of task and achievement verbs. Many philosophers of education misunderstood Ryle's distinction as teaching was often claimed to be a term with both an achievement sense (...)
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  • Indoctrination and Social Context: A System‐Based Approach to Identifying the Threat of Indoctrination and the Responsibilities of Educators.Rebecca M. Taylor - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (1):38-58.
    Debates about indoctrination raise fundamental questions about the ethics of teaching. This paper presents a philosophical analysis of indoctrination, including 1) an account of what indoctrination is and why it is harmful, and 2) a framework for understanding the responsibilities of teachers and other educational actors to avoid its negative outcomes. I respond to prominent outcomes-based accounts of indoctrination, which I argue share two limiting features—a narrow focus on the threat indoctrination poses to knowledge and on the dyadic relationship between (...)
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