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  1. Where is Morin's Road to Complexity Going?Laurent Dobuzinskis - 2004 - World Futures 60 (5 & 6):433 – 455.
    Edgar Morin took an early lead within the French intellectual community, but also in comparison with parallel reflections in the English-speaking world, as far as critical discussion of the epistemology of the new sciences of complexity is concerned. His "complex thought" raises many intriguing questions and offers a dazzling synthesis of a wide range of fields, from physics to biology to psychology and the social sciences. However, Morin's road to complexity bypasses some crucial issues in philosophy and political economy. Therefore, (...)
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  • Computation and Cognition: Issues in the Foundation of Cognitive Science.Zenon W. Pylyshyn - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):111-32.
    The computational view of mind rests on certain intuitions regarding the fundamental similarity between computation and cognition. We examine some of these intuitions and suggest that they derive from the fact that computers and human organisms are both physical systems whose behavior is correctly described as being governed by rules acting on symbolic representations. Some of the implications of this view are discussed. It is suggested that a fundamental hypothesis of this approach is that there is a natural domain of (...)
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  • Cognitive Representation and the Process-Architecture Distinction.Zenon W. Pylyshyn - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):154.
  • Functional Architectures for Cognition: Are Simple Inferences Possible?Steven W. Zucker - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):153.
  • Cognition is Not Computation, for the Reasons That Computers Don't Solve the Mind-Body Problems.Walter B. Weimer - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):152.
  • Computation and Symbolization.William E. Smythe - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):151.
  • Computation Without Representation.Stephen P. Stich - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):152.
  • Functional Architecture and Model Validation.Martin Ringle - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):150.
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  • Penetrating the Impenetrable.Georges Rey - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):149.
  • Pylyshyn and Perception.William T. Powers - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):148.
  • Explanations in Theories of Language and of Imagery.Steven Pinker - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):147.
  • Relativistic Color Coding as a Model for Quality Differences.Robert M. Anderson - 1978 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):345.
  • Criteria of Cognitive Impenetrability.Robert C. Moore - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):146.
  • Cognitive Penetrability: Let Us Not Forget About Memory.James R. Miller - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):146.
  • Computation, Consciousness and Cognition.George A. Miller - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):146.
  • Functional Architecture and Free Will.Henry E. Kyburg - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):143.
  • The Elusive Visual Processing Mode: Implications of the Architecture/Algorithm Distinction.Roberta L. Klatzky - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):142.
  • Reductionism and Cognitive Flexibility.Frank Keil - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):141.
  • The Borders of Cognition.Earl Hunt - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):140.
  • The Reification of the Mind-Body Problem?Stewart H. Hulse - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):139.
  • Computation, Cognition, and Representation.John Hell - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):139.
  • Psychology and Computational Architecture.John Haugeland - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):138.
  • Human and Computer Rules and Representations Are Not Equivalent.Stephen Grossberg - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):136.
  • In Defence of the Armchair.Michael Fortescue - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):135.
  • A Remark on the Completeness of the Computational Model of Mind.William Demopoulos - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):135.
  • From Computational Metaphor to Consensual Algorithms.Kenneth Mark Colby - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):134.
  • Plasticity: Conceptual and Neuronal.Paul M. Churchland - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):133.
  • Neuroscience and Psychology: Should the Labor Be Divided?Patricia Smith Churchland - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):133.
  • Conservatism and Common-Sense Realism.Kristóf Nyíri - 2016 - The Monist 99 (4):441-456.
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  • A Peircean Perspective on Integrating Economics and Evolutionary Theory. [REVIEW]James R. Wible - 2018 - Journal of Economic Methodology 25 (1):105-111.
  • Feminist Economics: An Austrian Perspective.Steven Horwitz - 1995 - Journal of Economic Methodology 2 (2):259-280.
    This paper attempts to assess the recent literature on feminist economics from the perspective of modern Austrian economics. Feminists and Austrians share many epistemological and methodological criticisms of neoclassical theory, although Austrians have never linked those criticisms to gender. Both groups argue that the attempt to mimic the methods of the natural sciences has been a particular source of trouble for neoclassicism. The paper suggests that these common points of criticism can serve as a starting point for dialogue between the (...)
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  • Hayekian Equilibrium and Change.Peter Lewin - 1997 - Journal of Economic Methodology 4 (2):245-266.
    What do we mean when we say action is possible in disequilibrium? If we adopt Hayek's approach to equilibrium, we must mean that we can act in a world where the plans that motivate and define those actions are not mutually compatible. This is hardly controversial. After all, the market process features rivalrous actions, that is, actions that are part of mutually inconsistent plans. Successful plans tend to displace unsuccessful ones. But, can we say, therefore, that, overall, plans tend to (...)
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  • Individualisme, Subjectivisme Et Mécanismes Économiques.Maurice Lagueux - 2001 - Dialogue 40 (4):691-.
    The economists of the Austrian School count among the most consistent supporters of methodological individualism, but they were for the most part strongly opposed to clearly anti-holist trends such as constructivism, reductionism, and positivism. This article discusses why the sort of methodological individualism defended by the Austrians could not, for interconnected reasons, be rendered compatible with any one of these philosophical trends. The manner in which the Austrians managed to reconcile their analysis of economic mechanisms with a strictly subjectivist approach (...)
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  • Values as Consequences of Transaction: Commentary on 'Reconciling Homo Economicus and John Dewey's Ethics'.Frank X. Ryan - 2003 - Journal of Economic Methodology 10 (2):245-257.
    Mark White hopes to incorporate John Dewey's appeal to deliberation in preference formation into the neoclassical model of choice. White finds affinities between Dewey and neoclassicism: both reject preordained goals, value consequences above motives, and promote 'scientific ethics.' I claim Dewey's actual theory of value and choice is more radically divergent, and may not simply be integrated with neoclassical model. Specifically, I claim: 1) White's interactional view of agents acting in an environment falls short of Dewey's transactional notion of their (...)
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  • Networks, Knowledge, and Entrepreneurship.G. R. Steele - 2012 - Critical Review 24 (1):101-113.
    Neural activity and social activity share close parallels, particularly the fact that spontaneous adaptations are paramount in both realms. Environmental pressures require organisms and societies to adapt to new and uncertain situations. Adaptations create, respectively, stronger neural and social networks that may, in turn, make the system more resilient to future uncertainties?but only if the adaptations are beneficial to the system.
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  • The Postmodern Moments of F. A. Hayek'S Economics.Theodore A. Burczak - 1994 - Economics and Philosophy 10 (1):31.
    Postmodernism is often characterized, among other things, as the belief in the unattainability of objective truth and as a rejection of teleological and reductionist, or essentialist, forms of thought. For instance, in his provocative book The Rhetoric of Economics, Donald McCloskey sketches the implications for economic methodology of Richard Rorty's rejection of the modernist quest for Truth, as represented by various rationalist and empiricist epistemologies. McCloskey describes modernist methodology as displaying a desire to predict and control, a search for objective–;which (...)
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  • From the Philosophy of Mind to the Philosophy of the Market.Peter J. Boettke & J. Robert Subrick - 2002 - Journal of Economic Methodology 9 (1):53-64.
    John Searle has argued against the viability of strong versions of artificial intelligence. His most well-known counter-example is the Chinese Room thought experiment where he stressed that syntax is not semantics. We reason by analogy to highlight previously unnoticed similarities between Searle and F.A. Hayek's critique of socialist planning. We extend their insights to explain the failure of many reforms in Eastern Europe in the 1990's.
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  • Innovative Therapies, Suspended Trials, and the Economics of Clinical Research: Facilitated Communication and Biomedical Cases.James R. Wible & Susan Dietrich - 2002 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 32 (3):275-309.
    University of North Carolina at Greensboro Most approaches to the philosophy of the natural and social sciences are basedon completed scientific investigations. However, there are many importantcases in science in which testing is incomplete. These cases are termed suspendedtrials and are particularly significant in biomedical and allied health fields. Initially,the authors' interest in suspended trials was piqued by a controversialmethod for assisting autistic children known as facilitated communication. Thisarticle examines facilitated communication and other examples of suspendedtrials from the perspective of (...)
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  • F.A. Hayek’s Theory of Mind and Theory of Cultural Evolution Revisited: Toward and Integrated Perspective. [REVIEW]Evelyn Gick & Wolfgang Gick - 2001 - Mind and Society 2 (1):149-162.
    F.A. Hayek’s theory of cultural evolution has often been regarded as incompatible with his earlier works. Since it lacks an elaborated theory of individual learning, we try to back his arguments by starting with his thoughts on individual perception described in hisTheory of Mind. With a focus on the current discussion concerning biological and cultural selection theories, we argue hisTheory of Mind leads to two different stages of societal evolution with well-defined learning processes, respectively. The first learning process describes his (...)
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  • Understanding Coevolution of Mind and Society: Institutions-as-Rules and Institutions-as-Equilibria.Shinji Teraji - 2017 - Mind and Society 16 (1-2):95-112.
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  • Basic Sensible Qualities and the Structure of Appearance.David R. Hilbert & Alex Byrne - 2008 - Philosophical Issues 18 (1):385-405.
    A sensible quality is a perceptible property, a property that physical objects (or events) perceptually appear to have. Thus smells, tastes, colors and shapes are sensible qualities. An egg, for example, may smell rotten, taste sour, and look cream and round.1,2 The sensible qualities are not a miscellanous jumble—they form complex structures. Crimson, magenta, and chartreuse are not merely three different shades of color: the first two are more similar than either is to the third. Familiar color spaces or color (...)
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  • Individualisme, Subjectivisme Et Mécanismes Économiques.Maurice Lagueux - 2001 - Dialogue 40 (4):691-722.
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  • On Cognition and Cultural Evolution.Shinji Teraji - 2014 - Mind and Society 13 (2):167-182.
  • Classical Game Theory, Socialization and the Rationalization of Conventions.Don Ross - 2008 - Topoi 27 (1-2):57-72.
    The paper begins by providing a game-theoretic reconstruction of Gilbert’s (1989) philosophical critique of Lewis (1969) on the role of salience in selecting conventions. Gilbert’s insight is reformulated thus: Nash equilibrium is insufficiently powerful as a solution concept to rationalize conventions for unboundedly rational agents if conventions are solutions to the kinds of games Lewis supposes. Both refinements to NE and appeals to bounded rationality can plug this gap, but lack generality. As Binmore (this issue) argues, evolutive game theory readily (...)
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