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  1. Leopold Ranke's Archival Turn: Location and Evidence in Modern Historiography*: Kasper Risbjerg Eskildsen.Kasper Risbjerg Eskildsen - 2008 - Modern Intellectual History 5 (3):425-453.
    From 1827 to 1831 the German historian Leopold von Ranke travelled through Germany, Austria, and Italy, hunting for documents and archives. During this journey Ranke developed a new model for historical research that transformed the archive into the most important site for the production of historical knowledge. Within the archive, Ranke claimed, the trained historian could forget his personal predispositions and political loyalties, and write objective history. This essay critically examines Ranke's model for historical research through a study of the (...)
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  • Collaborations, évitements et conflits entre disciplines autour d’un terrain partagé.Clémence Massart - 2016 - Natures Sciences Sociétés 24 (1):24-35.
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  • The Right Time for the Job? Insights Into Practices of Time in Contemporary Field Sciences.Isabelle Arpin & Céline Granjou - 2015 - Science in Context 28 (2):237-258.
    ArgumentTemporal issues appear to be crucial to the relationship between life scientists and their field sites and to the making of science in the field. We elaborate on the notion of practices of time to describe the ways life scientists cope with multiple and potentially conflicting temporal aspects that influence how they become engaged and remain engaged in a field-site, such as pleasure, long-term security, scientific productivity, and timeliness. With this notion, we seek to bring enhanced visibility and coherence to (...)
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  • Introduction: Historical Geographies of Science – Places, Contexts, Cartographies.Simon Naylor - 2005 - British Journal for the History of Science 38 (1):1-12.
    This paper outlines the contours of a historical geography of science. It begins by arguing for the relevance of spatially oriented histories of scientific thought and practice. The paper then considers three different historical geographies of science: those concerned with the places and spaces of science, those that detail the spatial contexts of scientific endeavour, and those that analyse the internal ‘cartographies’ of scientific theories and methods. The paper concludes with a discussion of other possible avenues of investigation in this (...)
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  • The Trial of Henry of Brederode.Pieter Huistra - 2013 - History of the Human Sciences 26 (4):50-66.
    The Dutch historiography of the middle of the 19th century was a culture of honour. Disputes over the reputations of historical figures were manifold. This article focuses on one controversy specifically that took place in the 1840s. The subject of debate was the 16th -century nobleman Henry of Brederode, his deeds, his character and his morals. The controversy was not only about content, however. Many suppositions about doing history and being a historian that otherwise remain tacit, were made explicit in (...)
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  • Marine Biology, Intertidal Ecology, and a New Place for Biology.Keith R. Benson - 2015 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 36 (3):312-320.
  • Wallace’s Other Line: Human Biogeography and Field Practice in the Eastern Colonial Tropics. [REVIEW]Jeremy Vetter - 2006 - Journal of the History of Biology 39 (1):89 - 123.
    This paper examines how the 19th-century British naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace used biogeographical mapping practices to draw a boundary line between Malay and Papuan groups in the colonial East Indies in the 1850s. Instead of looking for a continuous gradient of variation between Malays and Papuans, Wallace chose to look for a sharp discontinuity between them. While Wallace's "human biogeography" paralleled his similar project to map plant and animal distributions in the same region, he invoked distinctive "mental and moral" features (...)
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  • Introduction: Remembering Phil. [REVIEW]Sharon Kingsland - 2009 - Journal of the History of Biology 42 (2):205 - 214.
  • Finders, Keepers: Collecting Sciences and Collecting Practice.Robert E. Kohler - 2007 - History of Science 45 (150):428-454.
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  • A Sanctuary for Science: The Hastings Natural History Reservation and the Origins of the University of California's Natural Reserve System. [REVIEW]Peter S. Alagona - 2012 - Journal of the History of Biology 45 (4):651 - 680.
    In 1937 Joseph Grinnell founded the University of California's (U.C.) first biological field station, the Hastings Natural History Reservation. Hastings became a center for field biology on the West Coast, and by 1960 it was serving as a model for the creation of additional U.C. reserves. Today, the U.C. Natural Reserve System (NRS) is the largest and most diverse network of university-based biological field stations in the world, with 36 sites covering more than 135,000 acres. This essay examines the founding (...)
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  • The Ship as Laboratory: Making Space for Field Science at Sea. [REVIEW]Antony Adler - 2014 - Journal of the History of Biology 47 (3):333-362.
    Expanding upon the model of vessels of exploration as scientific instruments first proposed by Richard Sorrenson, this essay examines the changing nature of the ship as scientific space on expedition vessels during the late nineteenth century. Particular attention is paid to the expedition of H.M.S. Challenger as a turning point in the design of shipboard spaces that established a place for scientists at sea and gave scientific legitimacy to the new science of oceanography. There was a progressive development in research (...)
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  • Crustal Layering, Simplicity, and the Oil Industry: The Alteration of an Epistemic Paradigm by a Commercial Environment.Aitor Anduaga - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 41 (4):322-345.
  • Labscapes: Naturalizing the Lab.Robert E. Kohler - 2002 - History of Science 40 (130):473-501.
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  • Labs in the Field? Rocky Mountain Biological Stations in the Early Twentieth Century.Jeremy Vetter - 2012 - Journal of the History of Biology 45 (4):587 - 611.
  • A Place That Answers Questions: Primatological Field Sites and the Making of Authentic Observations.Amanda Rees - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 37 (2):311-333.
    The ideals and realities of field research have shaped the development of behavioural primatology over the latter half of the twentieth century. This paper draws on interviews with primatologists as well as a survey of the scientific literature to examine the idealized notion of the field site as a natural place and the physical environment of the field as a research space. It shows that what became standard field practice emerged in the course of wide ranging debate about the techniques, (...)
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  • Practice and Place in Twentieth-Century Field Biology: A Comment. [REVIEW]Robert E. Kohler - 2012 - Journal of the History of Biology 45 (4):579 - 586.
  • A Place That Answers Questions: Primatological Field Sites and the Making of Authentic Observations.Amanda Rees - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 37 (2):311-333.
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  • Crustal Layering, Simplicity, and the Oil Industry: The Alteration of an Epistemic Paradigm by a Commercial Environment.Aitor Anduaga - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 41 (4):322-345.
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  • Constructing Religion Without the Social: Durkheim, Latour, and Extended Cognition.Matthew Day - 2009 - Zygon 44 (3):719-737.
    I take up the question of how models of extended cognition might redirect the academic study of religion. Entering into a conversation of sorts with Emile Durkheim and Bruno Latour regarding the "overtakenness" of social agency, I argue that a robust portrait of extended cognition must redirect our interest in explaining religion in two key ways. First, religious studies should take up the methodological principle of symmetry that informs contemporary histories of science and begin theorizing the efficacy of gods as (...)
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  • Wallace’s Other Line: Human Biogeography and Field Practice in the Eastern Colonial Tropics.Jeremy Vetter - 2006 - Journal of the History of Biology 39 (1):89-123.
    This paper examines how the 19th-century British naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace used biogeographical mapping practices to draw a boundary line between Malay and Papuan groups in the colonial East Indies in the 1850s. Instead of looking for a continuous gradient of variation between Malays and Papuans, Wallace chose to look for a sharp discontinuity between them. While Wallace's "human biogeography" paralleled his similar project to map plant and animal distributions in the same region, he invoked distinctive "mental and moral" features (...)
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  • A Sanctuary for Science: The Hastings Natural History Reservation and the Origins of the University of California’s Natural Reserve System.Peter S. Alagona - 2012 - Journal of the History of Biology 45 (4):651-680.