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  1. Health Care Providers’ Ethical Perspectives on Waiver of Final Consent for Medical Assistance in Dying (MAiD): A Qualitative Study.Dianne Godkin, Lisa Cranley, Elizabeth Peter & Caroline Variath - 2022 - BMC Medical Ethics 23 (1):1-14.
    BackgroundWith the enactment of Bill C-7 in Canada in March 2021, people who are eligible for medical assistance in dying, whose death is reasonably foreseeable and are at risk of losing decision-making capacity, may enter into a written agreement with their healthcare provider to waive the final consent requirement at the time of provision. This study explored healthcare providers’ perspectives on honouring eligible patients’ request for MAiD in the absence of a contemporaneous consent following their loss of decision-making capacity. MethodA (...)
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  • Alzheimer's Disease — Perspective From Political Science: Public Policy Issues.Robert H. Blank - 2018 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 46 (3):724-743.
    The paper outlines the policy context and summarizes the numerous policy issues that AD raises from the more generic to the unique. It posits that strong public fears of AD and its future prevalence projections and costs, raise increasingly difficult policy dilemmas. After reviewing the costs in human lives and money and discussing the latest U.S. policy initiatives, the paper presents two policy areas as examples the demanding policy decisions we face. The first focuses on the basic regulatory function of (...)
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  • The Involvement of Family in the Dutch Practice of Euthanasia and Physician Assisted Suicide: A Systematic Mixed Studies Review.Bernadette Roest, Margo Trappenburg & Carlo Leget - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):23.
    Family members do not have an official position in the practice of euthanasia and physician assisted suicide in the Netherlands according to statutory regulations and related guidelines. However, recent empirical findings on the influence of family members on EAS decision-making raise practical and ethical questions. Therefore, the aim of this review is to explore how family members are involved in the Dutch practice of EAS according to empirical research, and to map out themes that could serve as a starting point (...)
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  • Euthanasia in Persons with Advanced Dementia: A Dignity-Enhancing Care Approach.Carlos Gómez-Vírseda & Chris Gastmans - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2021-107308.
    In current Western societies, increasing numbers of people express their desire to choose when to die. Allowing people to choose the moment of their death is an ethical issue that should be embedded in sound clinical and legal frameworks. In the case of persons with dementia, it raises further ethical questions such as: Does the person have the capacity to make the choice? Is the person being coerced? Who should be involved in the decision? Is the person’s suffering untreatable? The (...)
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  • Advance Healthcare Directives: Binding or Informational Value?Gianluca Montanari Vergallo - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (1):98-109.
    :Advance directives entail a refusal expressed by a still-healthy patient. Three consequences stem from that fact: advance refusal is unspecific, since it is impossible to predict what the patient’s conditions and the risk-benefit ratio may be in the foreseeable future; those decisions cannot be as well informed as those formulated while the disease is in progress; while both current consent and refusal can be revoked as the disease unfolds, until the treatment starts out, advance directives become effective when the patient (...)
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  • Euthanasia Requests in Dementia Cases; What Are Experiences and Needs of Dutch Physicians? A Qualitative Interview Study.Jaap Schuurmans, Romy Bouwmeester, Lamar Crombach, Tessa van Rijssel, Lizzy Wingens, Kristina Georgieva, Nadine O’Shea, Stephanie Vos, Bram Tilburgs & Yvonne Engels - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):1-9.
    In the Netherlands, in 2002, euthanasia became a legitimate medical act, only allowed when the due care criteria and procedural requirements are met. Legally, an Advanced Euthanasia Directive can replace direct communication if a patient can no longer express his own wishes. In the past decade, an exponential number of persons with dementia share a euthanasia request with their physician. The impact this on physicians, and the consequent support needs, remained unknown. Our objective was to gain more insight into the (...)
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