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  1. How Should I Be? A Defense of Platonic Rational Egoism.Jyl Gentzler - 2015 - European Journal of Philosophy 23 (1):39-67.
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  • VIII—Beyond Eros: Friendship in the "Phaedrus".Frisbee C. C. Sheffield - 2011 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 111 (2pt2):251-273.
    It is often held that Plato did not have a viable account of interpersonal love. The account of eros—roughly, desire—in the Symposium appears to fail, and, though the Lysis contains much suggestive material for an account of philia—roughly, friendship—this is an aporetic dialogue, which fails, ultimately, to provide an account of friendship. This paper argues that Plato's account of friendship is in the Phaedrus. This dialogue outlines three kinds of philia relationship, the highest of which compares favourably to the Aristotelian (...)
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  • Colloquium 2.Richard Kraut - 1991 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 7 (1):43-62.
  • “Standing Apart in the Shelter of the City Wall”: The Contemplative Ideal Vs. The Politically Engaged Philosopher in Plato's Political Theory.Catherine McKeen - 2010 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 48 (2):197-216.
    Natural philosophers seem to have good reasons to prefer that the kallipolis, the maximally just community of the Republic, is never realized. If such a community is realized, philosophers are under the obligation of a just demand that they govern. However, a life that contains governance as a significant part is not the happiest life a philosopher can live. The happiest life for a philosopher is one consisting entirely or largely in philosophical contemplation. I confront this puzzle by arguing that (...)
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  • Just State and Just Man : A Dialogue Between Plato and Confucius. PhD Thesis, University of Glasgow.Hsei-Yung Hsu - unknown
    In this thesis, I propose to explore Plato's moral and political thought in the Republic and compare it with similar ideas in Confucian thought, and in modern liberal thought. In Part I, I deal with Plato's notion of 'doing one's own job' in the just state (ch. 1), and with the Confucian approach to achieving an orderly society (ch. 2). In Chapter 3 the idea that both the Platonic just state and Confucian orderly society are communitarian by nature will be (...)
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  • As Happy As Can Be: How Republic's Philosophers Fare Best by Ruling.Cathal Woods - 2010 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 4 (1).
  • Reviving Greco‐Roman Friendship: A Bibliographical Review.Heather Devere - 1999 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 2 (4):149-187.
  • How Should I Be? A Defense of Platonic Rational Egoism.Jyl Gentzler - 2012 - European Journal of Philosophy 20 (4):39-67.
    There has been a long tradition of interpreting Plato as a rational egoist. Over the past few decades, however, some scholars have challenged this reading. While Rational Egoism appeals to many ordinary folk, in sophisticated philosophical circles it has fallen out of favor as a general and complete account of the nature of reasons for action. I argue that while the theory of practical rationality that is often equated with rational egoism—a view that I call ‘Simple-Minded Rational Egoism'—is neither plausible (...)
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