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  1. The Politics of the Gaze: Between Foucault and Merleau-Ponty. [REVIEW]Nick Crossley - 1993 - Human Studies 16 (4):399 - 419.
  • The Use and Abuse of Simone de Beauvoir: Re-Evaluating the French Poststructuralist Critique.Elaine Stavro - 1999 - European Journal of Women's Studies 6 (3):263-280.
    For many years poststructuralist feminists have denounced Simone de Beauvoir as a `universal humanist' who denies sexual difference and inscribes woman in a masculine discourse. Returning to the original exchanges between de Beauvoir and the French feminists of difference, where this dismissive attitude began, it is seen that de Beauvoir circulates in their discourse as representative of a bygone eraan embodiment of all that has been surpassed. Their criticisms of de Beauvoir prove for the most part, glib and disingenuous and (...)
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  • Simone de Beauvoir and the Beginnings of the Feminine Subject.Susan Hekman - 2015 - Feminist Theory 16 (2):137-151.
    Since de Beauvoir’s bold pronouncement that ‘One is not born a woman’ feminists have been struggling with the subject in feminist theory. Each new iteration of the subject has been advanced by its adherents as the ‘right’ definition, superseding the flawed definition that preceded it. This pattern aptly describes the reception of de Beauvoir’s subject. Feminist theorists since de Beauvoir have been disdainful of her subject, rejecting it as a tainted example of existentialism that has nothing to offer contemporary feminist (...)
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  • Re-Reading the Second Sex: Theorizing the Situation.Elaine Stavro - 2000 - Feminist Theory 1 (2):131-150.
    In this re-reading of The Second Sex, the author argues that Beauvoir transgressively employs Sartre’s universal binary categories of Being and Nothingnessin her effort to account for the economic, political, cultural and psychological conditions of women’s situation. In doing so, she challenges Sartre’s theory of radical ontological freedom and concretizes his abstract philosophic voice, thereby avoiding their rationalist and voluntarist implications. Contesting Beauvoir’s feminist critics, who saw her as emotionally and philosophically dependent on Sartre and her work as an amalgam (...)
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  • Simone de Beauvoir’s Phenomenology of Sexual Difference.Sara Heinämaa - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (4):114-132.
    : The paper argues that the philosophical starting point of Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex is the phenomenological understanding of the living body, developed by Edmund Husserl and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. It shows that Beauvoir's notion of philosophy stems from the phenomenological interpretation of Cartesianism which emphasizes the role of evidence, self-criticism, and dialogue.
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  • Simone de Beauvoir's Phenomenology of Sexual Difference.Sara Heinämaa - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (4):114-132.
    The paper argues that the philosophical starting point of Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex is the phenomenological understanding of the living body, developed by Edmund Husserl and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. It shows that Beauvoir's notion of philosophy stems from the phenomenological interpretation of Cartesianism which emphasizes the role of evidence, self-criticism, and dialogue.
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  • Book Review: Elizabeth Fallaize.Simone de Beauvoir: A Critical Reader. London and New York: Routledge, 1998. [REVIEW]Kristana Arp - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (4):186-191.
  • What is a Woman? Butler and Beauvoir on the Foundations of the Sexual Difference.Sara Heinämaa - 1997 - Hypatia 12 (1):20-39.
    The aim of this paper is to show that Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex has been mistakenly interpreted as a theory of gender, because interpreters have failed adequately to understand Beauvoir's aims. Beauvoir is not trying to explain facts, events, or states of affairs, but to reveal, unveil, or uncover (découvrir) meanings. She explicates the meanings of woman, female, and feminine. Instead of a theory, Beauvoir's book presents a phenomenological description of the sexual difference.
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  • Simone de Beauvoir's Notions of Appeal, Desire, and Ambiguity and Their Relationship to Jean-Paul Sartre's Notions of Appeal and Desire.Eva Gothlin - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (4):83-95.
    This essay focuses on some important concepts in Beauvoir's philosophy: ambiguity, desire, and appeal (appel). Ambiguity and appeal, concepts originating in Beauvoir's moral philosophy, are in The Second Sex connected to the female body and feminine desire. This indicates the complexity of Beauvoir's image of femininity. This essay also proposes a comparative reading of Beauvoir's and Sartre's concepts of appeal, a reading that indicates differences in their views of the relationship among ethics, desire, and gender.
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  • Paradoxes of Femininity in the Philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir.Ulrika Björk - 2010 - Continental Philosophy Review 43 (1):39-60.
    This article explicates the meaning of the paradox from the perspective of sexual difference, as articulated by Simone de Beauvoir. I claim that the self, the other, and their becoming are sexed in Beauvoir’s early literary writing before the question of sexual difference is posed in The Second Sex (1949). In particular, Beauvoir’s description of Françoise’s subjective becoming in the novel She Came to Stay (1943) anticipates her later systematic description of ‘the woman in love’. In addition, I argue that (...)
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  • Outside The Second Sex: Beauvoir’s “Pensée du Dehors”.Anna Alexander - 2003 - Bulletin de la Société Américaine de Philosophie de Langue Française 13 (1):94-127.
  • Confronting an Impasse: Reflections on the Past and Future of Beauvoir Scholarship.Margaret Simons - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (4):909-926.
    Hypatia's twenty-fifth anniversary in 2009, coming on the heels of Simone de Beauvoir's 100th birthday in 2008, provides an ideal moment to reflect on the past and future of research on Beauvoir's philosophy—the subject of two past Hypatia issues. Reviewing these early issues in the light of more recent publications reveals both the progress in Beauvoir scholarship and a scholarly impasse that must be confronted if that progress is to continue.
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  • Beauvoir, Irigaray, and the Mystical.Amy M. Hollywood - 1994 - Hypatia 9 (4):158 - 185.
    By reading the analyses of mysticism found in Beauvoir and Irigaray with and against some medieval women's mystical texts, the paper articulates a possible space for the divine within feminist thought.
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  • “A Dream, Dreamed by Reason … Hollow Like All Dreams”: French Existentialism and Its Critique of Abstract Liberalism. [REVIEW]Bart Van Leeuwen & Karen Vintges - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (3):653 - 674.
    The recent chiming of Simone de Beauvoir's legacy by French feminists for a policy of assimilation of Muslim women to Western models of self and society reduces the complexity and richness of Beauvoir's views in inacceptable ways. This article explores to what extent a politics of difference that challenges the ideals and political strategies of abstract liberalism can be extracted from and legitimized by the philosophies of Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre. Without assuming their thought is identical, we can (...)
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  • Generosity: Between Love and Desire.Rosalyn Diprose - 1998 - Hypatia 13 (1):1 - 20.
    "Safe sex" discourse attempts to protect women from dangers assumed inherent in erotic life, such as domination, submissiveness, and loss of freedom and self-control. However, Beauvoir's and Merleau-Ponty's revision of Sartre's ontology suggests that erotic life involves a kind of generosity that transforms existence; sex neither liberates personal existence nor poses a necessary threat to women's freedom. I also reconsider the conditions under which sex is assumed to involve a violation of being.
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  • “A Dream, Dreamed by Reason … Hollow Like All Dreams”: French Existentialism and Its Critique of Abstract Liberalism.Bart van Leeuwen & Karen Vintges - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (3):653-674.
    The recent claiming of Simone de Beauvoir's legacy by French feminists for a policy of assimilation of Muslim women to Western models of self and society reduces the complexity and richness of Beauvoir's views in inacceptable ways. This article explores to what extent a politics of difference that challenges the ideals and political strategies of abstract liberalism can be extracted from and legitimized by the philosophies of Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre. Without assuming their thought is identical, we can (...)
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  • Simone de Beauvoir’s Algerian War: Torture and the Rejection of Ethics.Melissa M. Ptacek - 2015 - Theory and Society 44 (6):499-535.
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  • Gabriel (-Honoré) Marcel.Brian Treanor - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  • Existentialism.Steven Crowell - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  • Singularity in Beauvoir's The Ethics of Ambiguity.Emily Anne Parker - 2015 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 53 (1):1-16.
    Though it has gone unnoticed so far in Beauvoir Studies, the term “singularity” is a technical one for Simone de Beauvoir. In the first half of the essay I discuss two reasons why this term has been obscured. First, as is well known Beauvoir has not been read in the context of the history of philosophy until recently. Second, in The Ethics of Ambiguity at least, singularité is translated both inconsistently and quite misleadingly. In the second half of the essay (...)
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