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  1. Diabetes, Chronic Illness and the Bodily Roots of Ecstatic Temporality.David Morris - 2008 - Human Studies 31 (4):399-421.
    This article studies the phenomenology of chronic illness in light of phenomenology’s insights into ecstatic temporality and freedom. It shows how a chronic illness can, in lived experience, manifest itself as a disturbance of our usual relation to ecstatic temporality and thence as a disturbance of freedom. This suggests that ecstatic temporality is related to another sort of time—“provisional time”—that is in turn rooted in the body. The article draws on Merleau-Ponty’s Phenomenology of Perception and Heidegger’s Being and Time , (...)
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  • Authenticity and Heidegger's Antigone.Katherine Withy - 2014 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 45 (3):239-253.
    Sophocles' Antigone is the only individual whom Heidegger names as authentic. But the usual interpretations of Heidegger's ‘authenticity’ either do not apply to Antigone or do not capture what Heidegger finds significant about her. By working through these failures, I develop an interpretation of Heideggerian authenticity that is adequate to his Antigone. The crucial step is accurately identifying the finitude to which Antigone authentically relates: what Heidegger calls ‘uncanniness'. I argue that uncanniness names being's presencing through self-withdrawal and that Antigone (...)
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  • Nurses Lived Experiences of Conscience Reaction: A Qualitative Phenomenological Study.Parkhideh Hasani, Rostam Jalali & Zhila Abedsaeedi - 2012 - Bangladesh Journal of Bioethics 2 (3):3-9.
  • Development and Initial Validation of the Stress of Conscience Questionnaire.Ann-Louise Glasberg, Sture Eriksson, Vera Dahlqvist, Elisabeth Lindahl, Gunilla Strandberg, Anna Söderberg, Venke Sørlie & Astrid Norberg - 2006 - Nursing Ethics 13 (6):633-648.
    Stress in health care is affected by moral factors. When people are prevented from doing ‘good’ they may feel that they have not done what they ought to or that they have erred, thus giving rise to a troubled conscience. Empirical studies show that health care personnel sometimes refer to conscience when talking about being in ethically difficult everyday care situations. This study aimed to construct and validate the Stress of Conscience Questionnaire (SCQ), a nine-item instrument for assessing stressful situations (...)
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  • Ingrouping, Outgrouping, and the Pragmatics of Peripheral Speech.Cassie Herbert & Rebecca Kukla - 2016 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 2 (4):576-596.
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  • Moral Feedback and Motivation: Revisiting the Undermining Effect.Elise Springer - 2008 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (4):407-423.
    Social psychologists have evidence that evaluative feedback on others’ choices sometimes has unwelcome negative effects on hearers’ motivation. Holroyd’s article (Holroyd J. Ethical Theory Moral Pract 10:267–278, 2007) draws attention to one such result, the undermining effect, that should help to challenge moral philosophers’ complacency about blame and praise. The cause for concern is actually greater than she indicates, both because there are multiple kinds of negative effect on hearer motivation, and because these are not, as she hopes, reliably counteracted (...)
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  • Being‐Towards‐Death and Owning One's Judgment.Denis McManus - 2015 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 91 (2):245-272.
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  • Call or Question: A Rehabilitation of Conscience as Dialogical.Nathan Dickman - 2018 - Sophia 57 (2):275-294.
    It is by way of the call that one is enabled to wake up to responsibility. What is the illocutionary mood of the ‘call’ of conscience, though? Is this transcendental enabler of responsibility an imposing demand or an invitational question? Both Levinas and Heidegger emphasize the impositional character of the call in conscience. The call seems to be the very essence of imperatives. I develop an apology for questioning by way of appeal to crumbs scattered throughout Jewish traditions as well (...)
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  • Burnout and Perceptions of Conscience Among Health Care Personnel: A Pilot Study.Gabriella Gustafsson, Sture Eriksson, Gunilla Strandberg & Astrid Norberg - 2010 - Nursing Ethics 17 (1):23-38.
    Although organizational and situational factors have been found to predict burnout, not everyone employed at the same workplace develops it, suggesting that becoming burnt out is a complex, multifaceted phenomenon. The aim of this study was to elucidate perceptions of conscience, stress of conscience, moral sensitivity, social support and resilience among two groups of health care personnel from the same workplaces, one group on sick leave owing to medically assessed burnout (n = 20) and one group who showed no indications (...)
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  • Revalidation of the Perceptions of Conscience Questionnaire (PCQ) and the Stress of Conscience Questionnaire (SCQ).J. Ahlin, E. Ericson-Lidman, A. Norberg & G. Strandberg - 2012 - Nursing Ethics 19 (2):220-232.
    The Perceptions of Conscience Questionnaire (PCQ) and the Stress of Conscience Questionnaire (SCQ) have previously been developed and validated within the ‘Stress of Conscience Study’. The aim was to revalidate these two questionnaires, including two additional, theoretically and empirically significant items, on a sample of healthcare personnel working in direct contact with patients. The sample consisted of 503 healthcare personnel. To test variation and distribution among the answers, descriptive statistics, item analysis and principal component analysis (PCA) were used to examine (...)
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