Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Competing Against the Unknown: The Impact of Enabling and Constraining Institutions on the Informal Economy.B. D. Mathias, Sean Lux, T. Russell Crook, Chad Autry & Russell Zaretzki - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 127 (2):251-264.
    In addition to facing the known competitors in the formal economy, entrepreneurs must also be concerned with rivalry emanating from the informal economy. The informal economy is characterized by actions outside the normal scope of commerce, such as unsanctioned payments and gift-giving, as means of influencing competition. Scholars and policy makers alike have an interest in mitigating the impacts of such informal activity in that it might present an obstacle for legitimate commerce. Received theory suggests that country institutions can enable (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • U.S. CEOs of SBUs in Luxury Goods Organizations: A Mixed Methods Comparison of Ethical Decision-Making Profiles.Jacqueline Wisler - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 149 (2):443-518.
    This study involved using a mixed method research design to examine the moral philosophy difference between the ethical decision-making process of CEOs in U.S.-led and non-U.S.-led within the luxury goods industry. The study employed a MANOVA to compare the ethical profiles between the two leader types and a phenomenological qualitative process to locate themes that give indication as to the compatibility of the luxury strategy values and practices with the principles and concepts of responsible leadership and conscious capitalism. As the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Detecting Fraud: The Role of the Anonymous Reporting Channel.Elka Johansson & Peter Carey - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 139 (2):391-409.
    The purpose of this paper is to examine whether anonymous reporting channels are effective in detecting fraud against companies. Fraud, which comprises predominantly asset misappropriation, represents a key operational risk and a major cost to organisations. The fraud triangle provides a framework for developing our understanding of how ARCs can increase detection of fraud. Using publicly listed company survey data collected by KPMG in Australia—where ARCs are not mandated—we find a positive association between ARCs and reported fraud. These results indicate (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Cultural Roots of Ethical Conflicts in Global Business.Carlos J. Sanchez-Runde, Luciara Nardon & Richard M. Steers - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 116 (4):689-701.
    This study examines the cultural roots of ethical conflicts in the global business environment. It begins with a brief look at worldviews on ethical behavior in general. Based on this, it is argued that an in-depth understanding of ethical conflicts has been hampered by an overreliance on Western models and viewpoints. Three common sources, or bases, of ethical conflicts are discussed as they relate to business practices, including conflicts over tastes and preferences, the relative importance of moral imperatives compared to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Role of Individual Variables, Organizational Variables and Moral Intensity Dimensions in Libyan Management Accountants’ Ethical Decision Making.Ahmed Musbah, Christopher J. Cowton & David Tyfa - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 134 (3):335-358.
    This study investigates the association of a broad set of variables with the ethical decision making of management accountants in Libya. Adopting a cross-sectional methodology, a questionnaire including four different ethical scenarios was used to gather data from 229 participants. For each scenario, ethical decision making was examined in terms of the recognition, judgment and intention stages of Rest’s model. A significant relationship was found between ethical recognition and ethical judgment and also between ethical judgment and ethical intention, but ethical (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • A Meta-Analytic Review of Ethical Leadership Outcomes and Moderators.Akanksha Bedi, Can M. Alpaslan & Sandy Green - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 139 (3):517-536.
    A growing body of research suggests that follower perceptions of ethical leadership are associated with beneficial follower outcomes. However, some empirical researchers have found contradictory results. In this study, we use social learning and social exchange theories to test the relationship between ethical leadership and follower work outcomes. Our results suggest that ethical leadership is related positively to numerous follower outcomes such as perceptions of leader interactional fairness and follower ethical behavior. Furthermore, we explore how ethical leadership relates to and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  • The Antecedents of Ethical Climates in the Spanish Business Higher Education Institutions.M. Edurne Aldazabal, Marcela Espinosa-Pike & Ana M. Martín-Arroyuelo - 2017 - Journal of Academic Ethics 15 (4):343-363.
    Ethical climate in organisations has been studied widely and its influence on ethical behaviour has been documented. However, little is known about the ethical climate at university context and about its antecedents. Universities are social change institutions and their ethical climate could influence the ethical behaviour of future economic, social and political leaders. The current study analyses the perceived ethical climate in Business Studies Higher Education Institutions in Spain and whether university’s ownership, size and signing up for international initiatives influence (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Effect of Ethical Leadership Behavior on Ethical Climate, Turnover Intention, and Affective Commitment.A. Akdogan & Ozgur Demirtas - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (1):59-67.
    This study examines a mediated model of ethical leadership on ethical climate, turnover intention, and affective commitment. It is suggested that managers are role models in their organizations. Specifically, through ethical leadership behavior, managers can influence perceptions of ethical climate, which in turn will positively influence organizational members’ turnover intention, and affective commitment. The results indicate that ethical leadership has both direct and indirect effect on affective commitment and turnover intention. The indirect effect of ethical leadership involves shaping perceptions of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations