Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Young Children Infer Preferences From a Single Action, but Not If It is Constrained.Madison L. Pesowski, Stephanie Denison & Ori Friedman - 2016 - Cognition 155:168-175.
    Inferring others’ preferences is socially important and useful. We investigated whether children infer preferences from the minimal information provided by an agent’s single action, and whether they avoid inferring preference when the action is constrained. In three experiments, children saw vignettes in which an agent took a worse toy instead of a better one. Experiment 1 shows that this single action influences how young children infer preferences. Children aged three and four were more likely to infer the agent preferred the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • If I Am Free, You Can’T Own Me: Autonomy Makes Entities Less Ownable.Christina Starmans & Ori Friedman - 2016 - Cognition 148:145-153.
    Although people own myriad objects, land, and even ideas, it is currently illegal to own other humans. This reluctance to view people as property raises interesting questions about our conceptions of people and about our conceptions of ownership. We suggest that one factor contributing to this reluctance is that humans are normally considered to be autonomous, and autonomy is incompatible with being owned by someone else. To investigate whether autonomy impacts judgments of ownership, participants recruited from Amazon Mechanical Turk read (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Developmental and Cultural Psychology of Free Will.Tamar Kushnir - 2018 - Philosophy Compass 13 (11):e12529.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Psychological Representation of Modality.Jonathan Phillips & Joshua Knobe - 2018 - Mind and Language 33 (1):1-.
    A series of recent studies have explored the impact of people's judgments regarding physical law, morality, and probability. Surprisingly, such studies indicate that these three apparently unrelated types of judgments often have precisely the same impact. We argue that these findings provide evidence for a more general hypothesis about the kind of cognition people use to think about possibilities. Specifically, we suggest that this aspect of people's cognition is best understood using an idea developed within work in the formal semantics (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations