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  1. Preparatory Attention: Experiment and Theory.David LaBerge, Laurent Auclair & Eric Sieroff - 2000 - Consciousness and Cognition 9 (3):396-434.
    This study investigated attention to a spatial location using a new spatial preparation task. Participants responded to a target dot presented in the center of a display and ignored a distractor dot presented to the right or left of the center. In an attempt to vary the level of preparatory attention directed to the target, the distractor dot was presented prior to the onset time of the target and the relative frequency of distractor dots to target dots within a block (...)
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  • The Emergence of a Shared Action Ontology: Building Blocks for a Theory.Thomas Metzinger & Vittorio Gallese - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):549-571.
    To have an ontology is to interpret a world. In this paper we argue that the brain, viewed as a representational system aimed at interpreting our world, possesses an ontology too. It creates primitives and makes existence assumptions. It decomposes target space in a way that exhibits a certain invariance, which in turn is functionally significant. We will investigate which are the functional regularities guiding this decomposition process, by answering to the following questions: What are the explicit and implicit assumptions (...)
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  • Motor Ontology: The Representational Reality of Goals, Actions and Selves.Vittorio Gallese & Thomas Metzinger - 2003 - Philosophical Psychology 16 (3):365 – 388.
    The representational dynamics of the brain is a subsymbolic process, and it has to be conceived as an "agent-free" type of dynamical self-organization. However, in generating a coherent internal world-model, the brain decomposes target space in a certain way. In doing so, it defines an "ontology": to have an ontology is to interpret a world. In this paper we argue that the brain, viewed as a representational system aimed at interpreting the world, possesses an ontology too. It decomposes target space (...)
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  • Representation and Knowledge Are Not the Same Thing.Leslie Smith - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):784-785.
    Two standard epistemological accounts are conflated in Dienes & Perner's account of knowledge, and this conflation requires the rejection of their four conditions of knowledge. Because their four metarepresentations applied to the explicit-implicit distinction are paired with these conditions, it follows by modus tollens that if the latter are inadequate, then so are the former. Quite simply, their account misses the link between true reasoning and knowledge.
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  • Toward a Theory of the Empirical Tracking of Individuals: Cognitive Flexibility and the Functions of Attention in Integrated Tracking.Nicolas J. Bullot - 2009 - Philosophical Psychology 22 (3):353-387.
    How do humans manage to keep track of a gradually changing object or person as the same persisting individual despite the fact that the extraction of information about this individual must often rely on heterogeneous information sources and heterogeneous tracking methods? The article introduces the Empirical Tracking of Individuals theory to address this problem. This theory proposes an analysis of the concept of integrated tracking, which refers to the capacity to acquire, store, and update information about the identity and location (...)
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  • The Subjectivity of Subjective Experience: A Representationalist Analysis of the First-Person Perspective.Thomas Metzinger - 2004 - Networks:285--306.
    Before one can even begin to model consciousness and what exactly it means that it is a subjective phenomenon one needs a theory about what a first-person perspective really is. This theory has to be conceptually convincing, empirically plausible and, most of all, open to new developments. The chosen conceptual framework must be able to accommodate scientific progress. Its ba- sic assumptions have to be plastic as it were, so that new details and empirical data can continuously be fed into (...)
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  • Automaticity and Processing Without Awareness.Joseph Tzelgov - 1999 - PSYCHE: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Research On Consciousness 5.
    COMMENTARY ON: LaBerge, D. "Attention, Awareness, and the Triangular Circuit". Consciousness and Cognition, 6, 149-181.
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  • The Missing Link: Commentary on LaBerge's Triangular Circuit.James Newman - 1998 - PSYCHE: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Research On Consciousness 4.
    COMMENTARY ON: LaBerge, D. . Attention, awareness, and the triangular circuit. Consciousness and Cognition, 6, 149-181. ABSTRACT: LaBerge proposes that underlying attention and self-awareness is a triangular circuit involving interconnected posterior cortical, thalamic and prefrontal neural ensembles. While the target paper makes only passing reference to it, the reticular nucleus of the thalamus is an integral part of the triangular circuit he posits. Indeed, it is essential to a complete understanding of his model.
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  • The Conundrum of Unconventional Consciousness: Comments on LaBerge's Theory of Attention and Awareness.Alan Rudell - 1999 - PSYCHE: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Research On Consciousness 5.
    COMMENTARY ON: LaBerge, D. "Attention, Awareness, and the Triangular Circuit". Consciousness and Cognition, 6, 149-181.
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  • Triangles, Pyramids, Connections and Attentive Inhibition.John Tsotsos - 1999 - PSYCHE: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Research On Consciousness 5.
    LaBerge's Triangular Theory of Attention contributes to several important topics in the study of visual attention. First, it expands on the discussion of whether attentive influences manifest themselves as neural suppression or enhancement; LaBerge seems to favour the enhancement viewpoint. Second, the paper proposes circuit loops that may be responsible for the observed enhancement. Finally, a link between awareness and attention is explored and the claim that a representation of self must be considered is made. Here, it will not be (...)
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  • Clarifying the Triangular Circuit Theory of Attention and its Relations to Awareness Replies to Seven Commentaries.David LaBerge - 2000 - PSYCHE: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Research On Consciousness 6.
    Replies are given to the commentaries of the seven cognitive science experts. Additional circuit diagrams clarify thalamic operations in attention and basal ganglia operations by which motivation affects attention. Selection-by-suppression and negative priming are accounted for within frontal control areas. Confusions between the terms awareness and consciousness persist, owing to the powerful habit of using awareness as a synonym for consciousness. Leaving consciousness as an umbrella term to denote many loosely-defined aspects of experience, the term awareness denotes the aspect of (...)
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  • Facilitation, Inhibition, and the Advantage of Two Connections.Kyle Cave - 1998 - PSYCHE: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Research On Consciousness 4.
    COMMENTARY ON: LaBerge, D. "Attention, Awareness, and the Triangular Circuit". Consciousness and Cognition, 6, 149-181.
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  • Consciousness of the Self (COS) and Explicit Knowledge.Guy Pinku & Joseph Tzelgov - 2006 - Consciousness and Cognition 15 (4):655-661.
    Starting with Dienes and Perner’s distinction between explicit and implicit knowledge and the traditional philosophical distinction between COS as an object and COS as a subject, we suggest a triple classification of COS experience into three modes, each corresponding to a different state of consciousness. When one acts automatically COS is totally embedded within the representation of the environment. When one monitors or attends to one’s experience, the self is implied by an explicit representation of one’s attitudes, consistent with Descartes’ (...)
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  • Controlled & Automatic Processing: Behavior, Theory, and Biological Mechanisms.Walter Schneider & Jason M. Chein - 2003 - Cognitive Science 27 (3):525-559.
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  • Perceptual Acceleration of Objects in Stream: Evidence From Flash-Lag Displays.T. Bachmann - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12 (2):279-297.
    An object in continuous motion is perceived ahead of the briefly flashed object, although the two images are physically aligned , the phenomenon called flash-lag effect. Flash-lag effects have been found also with other continuously changing features such as color, pattern entropy, and brightness as well as with streamed pre- and post-target input without any change of the feature values of streaming items in feature space . We interpret all instances of the flash-lag as a consequence of a more fundamental (...)
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  • The Cognitive Significance of Resonating Neurons in the Cerebral Cortex.David LaBerge & Ray Kasevich - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (4):1523-1550.