Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Truth in Fiction.Richard Woodward - 2011 - Philosophy Compass 6 (3):158-167.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  • What We Can Learn From Literary Authors.Alberto Voltolini - 2021 - Acta Analytica 36 (4):479-499.
    That we can learn something from literature, as cognitivists claim, seems to be a commonplace. However, when one considers matters more deeply, it turns out to be a problematic claim. In this paper, by focusing on general revelatory facts about the world and the human spirit, I hold that the cognitivist claim can be vindicated if one takes it as follows. We do not learn such facts from literature, if by “literature” one means the truth-conditional contents that one may ascribe (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Nature of Fiction/al Utterances.Aberto Voltolini - 2016 - Kairos 17 (1):28-55.
    In this paper, first of all, I want to try a new defense of the utterance approach as to the relationship between fictional and nonfictional works on the one hand and between fictional and nonfictional utterances on the other hand, notably the idea that the distinction between fictional and nonfictional works is derivative on the distinction between fictional and nonfictional utterances of the sentences that constitute a text. Moreover, I want to account for the second distinction in minimally contextualist semantic (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Self-concept through the diagnostic looking glass: Narratives and mental disorder.Şerife Tekin - 2011 - Philosophical Psychology 24 (3):357-380.
    This paper explores how the diagnosis of mental disorder may affect the diagnosed subject’s self-concept by supplying an account that emphasizes the influence of autobiographical and social narratives on self-understanding. It focuses primarily on the diagnoses made according to the criteria provided by the Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), and suggests that the DSM diagnosis may function as a source of narrative that affects the subject’s self-concept. Engaging in this analysis by appealing to autobiographies and memoirs written by (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  • Dewey on art as evocative communication.Scott R. Stroud - 2007 - Education and Culture 23 (2):pp. 6-26.
    In his work on aesthetics, John Dewey provocatively (and enigmatically) called art the "most universal and freest form of communication," and tied his reading of aesthetic experience to such an employment. I will explore how art, a seemingly obscure and indirect means of communication, can be used as the most effective and moving means of communication in certain circumstances. Dewey's theory of art will be shown to hold that art can be purposively employed to communicatively evoke a certain experience through (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • I—Kathleen Stock: Fictive Utterance and Imagining.Kathleen Stock - 2011 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 85 (1):145-161.
    A popular approach to defining fictive utterance says that, necessarily, it is intended to produce imagining. I shall argue that this is not falsified by the fact that some fictive utterances are intended to be believed, or are non-accidentally true. That this is so becomes apparent given a proper understanding of the relation of what one imagines to one's belief set. In light of this understanding, I shall then argue that being intended to produce imagining is sufficient for fictive utterance (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  • Who's Afraid Of A Paraphrase?Jerrold Levinson - 2001 - Theoria 67 (1):7-23.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Knowing Fictions: Metalepsis and the Cognitive Value of Fiction.Erik Schmidt - 2016 - Res Philosophica 93 (2):483-506.
    Recent discussions about the cognitive value of fiction either rely on a background theory of reference or a theory of imaginative pretense. I argue that this reliance produces a tension between the two central or defining claims of literary cognitivism that: fiction can have cognitive value by revealing or supporting insights into the world that properly count as true, and that the cognitive value of a work of fiction contributes directly to that work’s literary value. I address that tension by (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Aesthetic Value, Artistic Value, and Morality.Andrea Sauchelli - 2016 - In David Coady, Kimberley Brownlee & Kasper Lipper-Rasmussen (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Applied Philosophy. Blackwell. pp. 514-526.
    This entry surveys issues at the intersection of art and morality. Particular emphasis is placed on whether, and in what way, the moral character of a work of art influences its artistic value. Other topics include the educational function of art and artistic censorship.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Fiction and its other: How trespassers help defend the border.Marie-Laure Ryan - 2002 - Semiotica 2002 (138).
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Fictional, Metafictional, Parafictional.François Recanati - 2018 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 118 (1):25-54.
  • Determination and Uniformity: The Problem with Speech-Act Theories of Fiction.Stefano Predelli - 2019 - Erkenntnis 84 (2):309-324.
    Taking inspiration from Searle’s ‘The Logic of Fictional Discourse’, this essay presents an argument against different versions of the so-called ‘speech act theory of fiction’. In particular, it argues that a Uniformity Argument may be constructed, which is additional to the Determination Argument commonly attributed to Searle, and which does not rely on his presumably controversial Determination Principle. This Uniformity Argument is equally powerful against the ‘Dedicated Speech Act’ theories that Searle originally targeted, and the more recent, Grice-inspired versions of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Actualisme et fiction.Jérôme Pelletier - 2000 - Dialogue 39 (1):77-.
    The nonexistence of fictional entities does not seem incompatible with their possible existence. The aim of this paper is to give an account of the intuitive truth of statements of possible existence involving fictional proper names in an actualist framework. After having clarified the opposition between a possibilist and an actualist approach of possible wolds, I distinguish fictional individuals from fictional characters and the fictional use of fictional proper names from their metafictional use. On that basis, statements of possible existence (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Truth and genre in pindar.Arum Park - 2013 - Classical Quarterly 63 (1):17-36.
    By convention epinician poetry claims to be both obligatory and truthful, yet in the intersection of obligation and truth lies a seeming paradox: the poet presents his poetry as commissioned by a patron but also claims to be unbiased enough to convey the truth. In Slater's interpretation Pindar reconciles this paradox by casting his relationship to the patron as one of guest-friendship: when he declares himself a guest-friend of the victor, he agrees to the obligation ‘a) not to be envious (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Vague fictional objects.Elisa Paganini - 2020 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 63 (2):158-184.
    ABSTRACTI propose a different account of fictional objects from the ones already present in the literature. According to my account, fictional objects are culturally created abstract objects dependent for their existence on the pretence attitude adopted by a group of people towards a single fictional content. My work is divided into three parts: in the first one, I present how fictional objects come into existence according to my proposal; in the second part, I illustrate how the existence of fictional objects (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Fantasy, fiction, and feelings.Norman Kreitman - 2006 - Metaphilosophy 37 (5):605-622.
  • Fictional Surrogates.Ioan-Radu Motoarca - 2014 - Philosophia 42 (4):1033-1053.
    It is usually taken for granted, in discussions about fiction, that real things or events can occur as referents of fictional names . In this paper, I take issue with this view, and provide several arguments to the effect that it is better to take the names in fiction to refer to fictional surrogates of real objects. Doing so allows us to solve a series of problems that arise on the reference-continuity view. I also show that the arguments philosophers usually (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Literary Fictions as Utterances and Artworks.Jukka Mikkonen - 2010 - Theoria 76 (1):68-90.
    During the last decades, there has been a debate on the question whether literary works are utterances, or have utterance meaning, and whether it is reasonable to approach them as such. Proponents of the utterance model in literary interpretation, whom I will refer to as ‘utterance theorists,’ such as Noël Carroll and especially Robert Stecker, suggest that because of their nature as linguistic products of intentional human action, literary works are utterances similar to those used in everyday discourse. Conversely, those (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Epistemic marginalisation and the seductive power of art.Mihaela Mihai - 2018 - Contemporary Political Theory 17 (4):395-416.
    Many voices and stories have been systematically silenced in interpersonal conversations, political deliberations and historical narratives. Recalcitrant and interrelated patterns of epistemic, political, cultural and economic marginalisation exclude individuals as knowers, citizens, agents. Two questions lie at the centre of this article, which focuses on the epistemically – but also politically, culturally and economically – dominant: How can we sabotage the dominant’s investment in their own ignorance of unjust silencing? How can they be seduced to become acute perceivers of others’ (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Fictions that purport to tell the truth.Neri Marsili - forthcoming - Philosophical Quarterly.
    Can fictions make genuine assertions about the actual world? Proponents of the ‘Assertion View’ answer the question affirmatively: they hold that authors can assert, by means of explicit statements that are part of the work of fiction, that something is actually the case in the real world. The ‘Nonassertion’ View firmly denies this possibility. In this paper, I defend a nuanced version of the Nonassertion View. I argue that even if fictions cannot assert, they can indirectly communicate that what is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • About about: On poetry and paraphrase.Angela Leighton - 2009 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 33 (1):167-176.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • An Inferentialist Account of Fictional Names.Byeong D. Lee - 2022 - Organon F: Medzinárodný Časopis Pre Analytickú Filozofiu 29 (3):290–326.
    The goal of this paper is to present and defend an inferentialist account of the meaning of fictional names on the basis of Sellars-Brandom’s inferentialist semantics and a Brandomian anaphoric theory of reference. On this inferentialist account, the meaning of a fictional name is constituted by the relevant language norms which provide the correctness conditions for its use. In addition, the Brandomian anaphoric theory of reference allows us to understand reference in terms of anaphoric word-word relations, rather than substantial word-world (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • On not expecting too much from narrative.Peter Lamarque - 2004 - Mind and Language 19 (4):393–408.
    The paper offers a mildly deflationary account of narrative, drawing attention to the minimal, thus easily satisfied, conditions of narrativity and showing that many of the more striking claims about narrative are either poorly supported or refer to distinct classes of narrative—usually literary or fictional—which provide a misleading paradigm for narration in general. An enquiry into structural, referential, pragmatic, and valuebased features of narrative helps circumscribe the limits of narration and the test case of the narrative definition of the self (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   53 citations  
  • Aesthetics and literature: A problematic relation?Peter Lamarque - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 135 (1):27 - 40.
    The paper argues that there is a proper place for literature within aesthetics but that care must be taken in identifying just what the relation is. In characterising aesthetic pleasure associated with literature it is all too easy to fall into reductive accounts, for example, of literature as merely “fine writing”. Belleslettrist or formalistic accounts of literature are rejected, as are two other kinds of reduction, to pure meaning properties and to a kind of narrative realism. The idea is developed (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • On modality in fiction.Miloš Kosterec - 2021 - Synthese 199 (5-6):13543-13567.
    This paper investigates the truth values of modal sentences within fictional discourse. I investigate the consequences of possible worlds–based theories of truth in fiction for the truth, in fiction, of modal sentences. I elaborate on the consequences of explicit reliable sentences within the truth-in-fiction operators if we embed the normal modal logics. I prove that the current main possible worlds theories of truth-in-fiction make explicit reliable sentences within fiction truth-value equivalent to their possibility. This has non-intuitive consequences if we employ (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Literature from an aesthetic point of view.Deborah Knight - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 135 (1):41 - 47.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Art, morality and ethics: On the (im)moral character of art works and inter-relations to artistic value.Matthew Kieran - 2006 - Philosophy Compass 1 (2):129–143.
  • The limits of spectatorial folk psychology.Daniel D. Hutto - 2004 - Mind and Language 19 (5):548-73.
    It is almost universally agreed that the main business of commonsense psychology is that of providing generally reliable predictions and explanations of the actions of others. In line with this, it is also generally assumed that we are normally at theoretical remove from others such that we are always ascribing causally efficacious mental states to them for the purpose of prediction, explanation and control. Building on the work of those who regard our primary intersubjective interactions as a form of 'embodied (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   99 citations  
  • Folk psychological narratives and the case of autism.Daniel D. Hutto - 2003 - Philosophical Papers 32 (3):345-361.
    This paper builds on the insights of Jerome Bruner by underlining the central importance of narratives explaining actions in terms of reasons, arguing that by giving due attention to the central roles that they play in our everyday understanding of others provides a better way of explicating the nature and source of that activity than does simulation theory, theory-theory or some union of the two. However, although I promote Bruner's basic claims about the roles narratives play in this everyday enterprise, (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Indexed Mental Files and Names in Fiction.Enrico Grosso - 2019 - Disputatio 11 (54):271-289.
    In this paper, I argue that the theory of mental files can provide a unitary cognitive account of how names and singular terms work in fiction. I will suggest that the crucial notion we need is not the one of regular file, i.e., a file whose function is to accumulate information that we take to be about a single object of the outside world, but the notion of indexed file, i.e., a file that stands, in the subject’s mind, for another (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • XII. Narrative and Perspective; Values and Appropriate Emotions.Peter Goldie - 2003 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 52:201-220.
    To the realists.—You sober people who feel well armed against passion and fantasies and would like to turn your emptiness into a matter of pride and ornament: you call yourselves realists and hint that the world really is the way it appears to you. As if reality stood unveiled before you only, and you yourselves were perhaps the best part of it … But in your unveiled state are not even you still very passionate and dark creatures compared to fish, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Aptness of emotions for fictions and imaginings.Jonathan Gilmore - 2011 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 92 (4):468-489.
    Many philosophical accounts of the emotions conceive of them as susceptible to assessments of rationality, fittingness, or some other notion of aptness. Analogous assumptions apply in cases of emotions directed at what are taken to be only fictional or only imagined. My question is whether the criteria governing the aptness of emotions we have toward what we take to be real things apply invariantly to those emotions we have toward what we take to be only fictional or imagined. I argue (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  • Cognitivism and the arts.John Gibson - 2008 - Philosophy Compass 3 (4):573-589.
    Cognitivism in respect to the arts refers to a constellation of positions that share in common the idea that artworks often bear, in addition to aesthetic value, a significant kind of cognitive value. In this paper I concentrate on three things: (i) the challenge of understanding exactly what one must do if one wishes to defend a cognitivist view of the arts; (ii) common anti-cognitivist arguments; and (iii) promising recent attempts to defend cognitivism.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  • Singular Reference in Fictional Discourse?Manuel García-Carpintero - 2019 - Disputatio 11 (54):143-177.
    Singular terms used in fictions for fictional characters raise well-known philosophical issues, explored in depth in the literature. But philosophers typically assume that names already in use to refer to “moderatesized specimens of dry goods” cause no special problem when occurring in fictions, behaving there as they ordinarily do in straightforward assertions. In this paper I continue a debate with Stacie Friend, arguing against this for the exceptionalist view that names of real entities in fictional discourse don’t work there as (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Predelli on Fictional Discourse.Manuel García-Carpintero - 2022 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 80 (1):83-94.
    John Searle argues that fictions are constituted by mere pretense—by the simulation of representational activities like assertions, without any further representational aim. They are not the result of sui generis, dedicated speech acts of a specific kind, on a par with assertion. The view had earlier many defenders, and still has some. Stefano Predelli enlists considerations derived from Searle in support of his radical fictionalism. This is the view that a sentence of fictional discourse including a prima facie empty fictional (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The great beetle debate: A study in imagining with names.Stacie Friend - 2011 - Philosophical Studies 153 (2):183-211.
    Statements about fictional characters, such as “Gregor Samsa has been changed into a beetle,” pose the problem of how we can say something true (or false) using empty names. I propose an original solution to this problem that construes such utterances as reports of the “prescriptions to imagine” generated by works of fiction. In particular, I argue that we should construe these utterances as specifying, not what we are supposed to imagine—the propositional object of the imagining—but how we are supposed (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  • Reference in Fiction.Stacie Friend - 2019 - Disputatio 11 (54):179-206.
    Most discussions of proper names in fiction concern the names of fictional characters, such as ‘Clarissa Dalloway’ or ‘Lilliput.’ Less attention has been paid to referring names in fiction, such as ‘Napoleon’ or ‘London’. This is because many philosophers simply assume that such names are unproblematic; they refer in the usual way to their ordinary referents. The alternative position, dubbed Exceptionalism by Manuel García-Carpintero, maintains that referring names make a distinctive semantic contribution in fiction. In this paper I offer a (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Models and fiction.Roman Frigg - 2010 - Synthese 172 (2):251-268.
    Most scientific models are not physical objects, and this raises important questions. What sort of entity are models, what is truth in a model, and how do we learn about models? In this paper I argue that models share important aspects in common with literary fiction, and that therefore theories of fiction can be brought to bear on these questions. In particular, I argue that the pretence theory as developed by Walton has the resources to answer these questions. I introduce (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   163 citations  
  • Getting Carried Away: Evaluating the Emotional Influence of Fiction Film.Stacie Friend - 2010 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 34 (1):77-105.
    It is widely taken for granted that fictions, including both literature and film,influence our attitudes toward real people, events, and situations. Philosopherswho defend claims about the cognitive value of fiction view this influence in apositive light, while others worry about the potential moral danger of fiction.Marketers hope that visual and aural references to their products in movies willhave an effect on people’s buying patterns. Psychologists study the persuasiveimpact of media. Educational books and films are created in the hopes of guidingchildren’s (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Fiction as a Genre.Stacie Friend - 2012 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 112 (2pt2):179--209.
    Standard theories define fiction in terms of an invited response of imagining or make-believe. I argue that these theories are not only subject to numerous counterexamples, they also fail to explain why classification matters to our understanding and evaluation of works of fiction as well as non-fiction. I propose instead that we construe fiction and non-fiction as genres: categories whose membership is determined by a cluster of nonessential criteria, and which play a role in the appreciation of particular works. I (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   50 citations  
  • Fictional characters.Stacie Friend - 2007 - Philosophy Compass 2 (2):141–156.
    If there are no fictional characters, how do we explain thought and discourse apparently about them? If there are, what are they like? A growing number of philosophers claim that fictional characters are abstract objects akin to novels or plots. They argue that postulating characters provides the most straightforward explanation of our literary practices as well as a uniform account of discourse and thought about fiction. Anti-realists counter that postulation is neither necessary nor straightforward, and that the invocation of pretense (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   44 citations  
  • Argument from Personal Narrative: A Case Study of Rachel Moran's Paid For: My Journey Through Prostitution.Katherine Dormandy - 2016 - Res Philosophica 93 (3):601-620.
    Personal narratives can let us in on aspects of reality which we have not experienced for ourselves, and are thus important sources for philosophical reflection. Yet a venerable tradition in mainstream philosophy has little room for arguments which rely on personal narrative, on the grounds that narratives are particular and testimonial, whereas philosophical arguments should be systematic and transparent. I argue that narrative arguments are an important form of philosophical argument. Their testimonial aspects witness to novel facets of reality, but (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Lies in Art.Daisy Dixon - 2022 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 100 (1):25-39.
    This paper aims to show that any account of how artworks lie must acknowledge (I) that artworks can lie at different levels of their content—what I call ‘surface’ and ‘deep’—and (II) that, for an artwork to lie at a given level, a norm of truthful communication such as Grice’s Maxim of Quality must apply to it. A corollary is that it’s harder than you might think for artworks to lie: Quality is not automatically ‘switched on’ during our engagement with art. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Goodman’s Many Worlds.Alexandre Declos - 2019 - Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 7 (6):1-25.
    In this paper, I examine Nelson Goodman’s pluriworldism, understood as the claim that there exists a plurality of actual worlds. This proposal has generally been quickly dismissed in the philosophical literature. I argue that we ought to take it more seriously. As I show, many of the prima facie objections to pluriworldism may receive straightforward answers. I also examine in detail Goodman’s argument for the conclusion that there are many worlds and attempt to show how it might be supported. Eventually, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Imagining in response to fiction: unpacking the infrastructure.Alon Chasid - 2019 - Philosophical Explorations 23 (1):31-48.
    Works of fiction are alleged to differ from works of nonfiction in instructing their audience to imagine their content. Indeed, works of fiction have been defined in terms of this feature: they are works that mandate us to imagine their content. This paper examines this definition of works of fiction, focusing on the nature of the activity that ensues in response to reading or watching fiction. Investigating how imaginings function in other contexts, I show, first, that they presuppose a cognitive (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Art and ethical criticism: An overview of recent directions of research.Noël Carroll - 2000 - Ethics 110 (2):350-387.
  • Elusive Fictional Truth.Craig Bourne & Emily Caddick Bourne - 2022 - British Journal of Aesthetics 62 (1):15-31.
    We argue that some fictional truths are fictionally true by default. We also argue that these fictional truths are subject to being undermined. We propose that the context within which we are to evaluate what is fictionally true changes when a possibility which was previously ignorable is brought to attention. We argue that these cases support a model of fictional truth which makes the conversational dynamics of determining truth in fiction structurally akin to the conversational dynamics of knowledge-ascription, as this (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Bureau and the Realism of Spy Fiction.Pauline Blistène - 2022 - Open Philosophy 5 (1):231-249.
    This article addresses the issue of realism in relationship to contemporary serial fiction. Drawing on The Bureau, it argues that spy TV series are “realistic” not because they correspond to reality but because of their impact on reality. It begins by giving an overview of the many ways in which “realism,” in the ordinary sense of a resemblance with reality, served as the working framework for The Bureau’s team. It then identifies three distinct types of realisms in the series. The (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Fictional reports.Paal Fjeldvig Antonsen - 2019 - Synthese 198 (6):5675-5688.
    This paper outlines a bicontextual account of fictional reports. A fictional report is a report on something that happens in a fiction, and a bicontextual account is an account that relativizes truth to two contexts. The proposal is motivated by two considerations. First, it explains the intuitive truth conditions of fictional reports without postulating hidden fiction operators. Second, it handles the problem of indexicals in fictional reports better than the standard accounts.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Fictional reports.Pål Fjeldvig Antonsen - 2020 - Synthese:1-14.
    This paper outlines a bicontextual account of fictional reports. A fictional report is a report on something that happens in a fiction, and a bicontextual account is an account that relativizes truth to two contexts. The proposal is motivated by two considerations. First, it explains the intuitive truth conditions of fictional reports without postulating hidden fiction operators. Second, it handles the problem of indexicals in fictional reports better than the standard accounts.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark